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National Cancer Institute

NATIONAL
October 1, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Andrew von Eschenbach, named last week as interim Food and Drug Administration commissioner to replace Lester Crawford, will take a leave of absence from his job as director of the National Cancer Institute, Sen. Barbara Mikulski said. Von Eschenbach also will "refrain from selected FDA activities that may be seen as a conflict of interest," Mikulski, a Maryland Democrat, said in a statement.
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NEWS
December 5, 1985 | Associated Press
News of a promising new cancer treatment at the National Cancer Institute prompted a flood of calls to the federal center today from people desperate for a cure from the disease. The callers want information about a new treatment, called adoptive immunotherapy, that turns ordinary white blood cells into "killer cells" that attack malignant tumors. The treatment was announced Wednesday in an article in the New England Journal of Medicine. (Story, Page 12)
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
Former U.S. Rep. Bill Chappell Jr. (D-Fla.), defeated last year after 20 years in Congress, said Friday that he is being treated for bone cancer. Chappell, 67, was admitted to the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md., on Feb. 23 by the National Cancer Institute and is in stable condition, a spokeswoman said.
SCIENCE
May 22, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
Here's a scientific finding that may knock you off your feet: At least 80 types of fungi reside on a typical person's heel, along with 60 between the toes and 40 on the toenail. Altogether, the feet are home to more than 100 types of fungus, more than any other area of the human body, according to a study published Wednesday by the journal Nature. And that fungal fellowship is in constant motion as we walk through life. It may sound icky, but many of the fungi on our skin serve a very useful purpose, said study leader Julie Segre, a geneticist at the National Human Genome Research Institute in Bethesda, Md. "One of the major functions of healthy fungi is to prevent pathogenic fungi from adhering to our skin," where they can cause athlete's foot, plantar warts and stubborn toenail infections, she said.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Test-tube experiments at a National Institutes of Health laboratory show evidence that a drug called hydroxyurea may block or slow the replication of the AIDS virus, researchers report. In a study published in the journal Science, researchers at the National Cancer Institute report that HIV, which causes AIDS, is unable to reproduce in cells exposed to hydroxyurea, a cancer drug that has been used for 30 years.
NEWS
February 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guidelines for breast cancer screening could be changed by some medical organizations once they fully analyze new studies showing mammograms may provide little benefit for women before age 50, officials said. Dr. Gerald P. Murphy, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society, said his group is examining the new studies, but "not all of the information has been evaluated, and there are no conclusions that can be made on this as yet."
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