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National Cancer Institute

NATIONAL
October 1, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Andrew von Eschenbach, named last week as interim Food and Drug Administration commissioner to replace Lester Crawford, will take a leave of absence from his job as director of the National Cancer Institute, Sen. Barbara Mikulski said. Von Eschenbach also will "refrain from selected FDA activities that may be seen as a conflict of interest," Mikulski, a Maryland Democrat, said in a statement.
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NEWS
December 5, 1985 | Associated Press
News of a promising new cancer treatment at the National Cancer Institute prompted a flood of calls to the federal center today from people desperate for a cure from the disease. The callers want information about a new treatment, called adoptive immunotherapy, that turns ordinary white blood cells into "killer cells" that attack malignant tumors. The treatment was announced Wednesday in an article in the New England Journal of Medicine. (Story, Page 12)
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
Former U.S. Rep. Bill Chappell Jr. (D-Fla.), defeated last year after 20 years in Congress, said Friday that he is being treated for bone cancer. Chappell, 67, was admitted to the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md., on Feb. 23 by the National Cancer Institute and is in stable condition, a spokeswoman said.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong, Los Angeles Times
Pancreatic cancer, the most aggressive type of cancer, has claimed the life of astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. Ride died Monday at age of 61 after a 17-month-long battle against the disease. Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths for people in the United States. It has the lowest survival rate of any type of cancer - according to the American Cancer Society, the one-year survival rate is 20% for all stages of pancreatic cancer combined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
She has had four surgeries to remove her thyroid, parathyroid and vocal cord nerve, along with muscle and tissue. Once a year, she goes to a hospital and swallows a radioactive iodine capsule to attack the remaining cancer cells — and then remains in isolation for four days. During what she calls her quarantine, she can't touch — or even be in the same room as — anyone else. The treatment causes soreness, swelling, nausea and headaches. Each year, as the ordeal approaches, she scans the Internet for support groups.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Test-tube experiments at a National Institutes of Health laboratory show evidence that a drug called hydroxyurea may block or slow the replication of the AIDS virus, researchers report. In a study published in the journal Science, researchers at the National Cancer Institute report that HIV, which causes AIDS, is unable to reproduce in cells exposed to hydroxyurea, a cancer drug that has been used for 30 years.
NEWS
February 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guidelines for breast cancer screening could be changed by some medical organizations once they fully analyze new studies showing mammograms may provide little benefit for women before age 50, officials said. Dr. Gerald P. Murphy, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society, said his group is examining the new studies, but "not all of the information has been evaluated, and there are no conclusions that can be made on this as yet."
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