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NEWS
March 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Frying, broiling and barbecuing produce potentially carcinogenic compounds in meat, chicken and fish, but microwaving, stewing and poaching do not, the National Cancer Institute said in reporting on a laboratory study. Researchers at the institute's Division of Cancer Etiology found that cooking at high temperatures and for a long time produced compounds that caused cancer in monkeys and other lab animals. Dr.
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NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong, Los Angeles Times
Pancreatic cancer, the most aggressive type of cancer, has claimed the life of astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. Ride died Monday at age of 61 after a 17-month-long battle against the disease. Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths for people in the United States. It has the lowest survival rate of any type of cancer - according to the American Cancer Society, the one-year survival rate is 20% for all stages of pancreatic cancer combined.
SCIENCE
October 31, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Low levels of vitamin D in the blood double the risk of developing bladder cancer, Spanish researchers reported Wednesday. The low levels increase the risk of the most aggressive form of the disease almost six-fold, the researchers reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Spain has about 11,000 new cases of bladder cancer per year, one of the highest rates in the world. The United States has about 73,500 new cases per year, with nearly 15,000 deaths. It is primarily a disease of the elderly, with nine out of 10 victims over the age of 55. Low levels of vitamin D have previously been linked to increased risk of breast and colon cancer, but no one has studied the potential association with bladder cancer, according to Dr. Nuria Malats, a geneticist at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
You would think that people who were diagnosed with melanoma -- the most deadly form of skin cancer -- would be meticulously careful about using sunscreen, avoiding tanning salons and generally protecting their skin. You would be wrong, researchers said Monday. Melanoma tumors develop in the skin cells that make melanin, the brown pigment that protects skin from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is the least common type of skin cancer, but it can be the most dangerous.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Taking an acetaminophen tablet daily for at least five years reduces the risk of developing prostate cancer by 38%, researchers from the American Cancer Society reported Monday. Using the drug, the best-known form of which is Tylenol, also reduces the risk of the more aggressive form of prostate cancer by 51%, the team reported in the online version of the journal Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. Previous research has shown that daily doses of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
NEWS
January 24, 1988 | DAVID MARANISS and MICHAEL WEISSKOPF, The Washington Post
Kay Gaudet, the village pharmacist, started keeping her list a year ago. The first name on it was Peggy, her younger sister. The next nine were friends and neighbors. All had been pregnant about the same time, but there were no babies to show for it, only the private agony of miscarriage. Gaudet was concerned and curious. Was it coincidence? How many other women in St. Gabriel, population 2,100, had suffered similar fates?
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | From United Press International
The federal government and the American Cancer Society on Monday announced a stop-smoking drive expected to reach more than one-fifth of the U.S. population and at least 15 million smokers. The National Cancer Institute estimates it will spend $116.5 million on the project, which is being billed as "the world's largest" effort to reduce smoking.
NEWS
April 26, 1989
U.S. cancer researchers announced a joint cancer study with the Soviet Union. Scientists from the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston said the study--three separate clinical trials--will be the first of its kind. It will involve carefully monitored trials of new therapies on several hundred Soviet and American patients over two years, said Dr. Emil Frei III, director of the Dana-Farber institute, which is affiliated with Harvard Medical School.
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