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SCIENCE
May 3, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
A man with no risk factors for prostate cancer can go his whole life without ever taking a PSA test, according to the American Urological Assn. In a new clinical guideline unveiled Friday, the urologists said that only men between the ages of 55 and 69 should even consider getting a PSA screening test if they have no signs or symptoms of prostate cancer. Men should only get tested after discussing all the pros and cons with their doctors, and if they decide to get tested, they should not get tested again for at least two years, the guideline advises.
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NEWS
January 10, 2013 | By Rosie Mestel
Between 1940 and 1971, many pregnant women were treated with a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol -- commonly known as DES -- to prevent miscarriage and other complications. The drug didn't work for that purpose, but it did have biological effects on the women who took it,  as well as their children. On Wednesday, four sisters who'd been exposed to DES in the womb reached a settlement with one of the drug's principal makers, Eli Lilly & Co., during a federal trial in Boston, the Associated Press reported.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Taking an acetaminophen tablet daily for at least five years reduces the risk of developing prostate cancer by 38%, researchers from the American Cancer Society reported Monday. Using the drug, the best-known form of which is Tylenol, also reduces the risk of the more aggressive form of prostate cancer by 51%, the team reported in the online version of the journal Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. Previous research has shown that daily doses of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
SCIENCE
July 18, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Most patients diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer will live just as long if they simply watch their cancers rather than have them surgically removed, according to the results of a landmark clinical trial that could upend the medical approach to a disease that affects 1 in 6 men. The study, which focused on cancers still confined to the prostate, should reassure patients who want to avoid distressing side effects of surgery - such as urinary incontinence...
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | From United Press International
The federal government and the American Cancer Society on Monday announced a stop-smoking drive expected to reach more than one-fifth of the U.S. population and at least 15 million smokers. The National Cancer Institute estimates it will spend $116.5 million on the project, which is being billed as "the world's largest" effort to reduce smoking.
NEWS
April 26, 1989
U.S. cancer researchers announced a joint cancer study with the Soviet Union. Scientists from the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston said the study--three separate clinical trials--will be the first of its kind. It will involve carefully monitored trials of new therapies on several hundred Soviet and American patients over two years, said Dr. Emil Frei III, director of the Dana-Farber institute, which is affiliated with Harvard Medical School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1988
A $200,000 award for pioneering work in cancer therapy will be presented to Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, chief of the surgical branch of the National Cancer Institute, it was announced by the Hammer Prize Foundation. Dr. Armand Hammer, who is chairman of the President's Cancer Panel, will give the special Hammer Cancer Prize for Adoptive Immunotherapy to Rosenberg at a luncheon Tuesday at the Westwood headquarters of Occidental Petroleum Corp.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2003 | Aaron Zitner
The National Cancer Institute has posted a statement on its Web site saying top experts do not believe abortion raises a woman's risk of breast cancer. The institute had a similar statement on its Web site until last year, when it replaced it with one saying that study data were "inconsistent." Abortion rights groups said the change was intended to please the Bush administration's allies in the antiabortion movement.
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