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NEWS
May 8, 1987
A controversial drug to treat two lethal types of cancer has won approval from the Food and Drug Administration for wider trials in humans, it was announced. An FDA spokeswoman said the agency will permit the National Cancer Institute to expand the use of interleukin-2 to a larger number of patients with advanced melanoma and kidney cancer. The treatment will be available to patients selected for participation in tests at NCI-approved cancer centers.
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NEWS
March 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Frying, broiling and barbecuing produce potentially carcinogenic compounds in meat, chicken and fish, but microwaving, stewing and poaching do not, the National Cancer Institute said in reporting on a laboratory study. Researchers at the institute's Division of Cancer Etiology found that cooking at high temperatures and for a long time produced compounds that caused cancer in monkeys and other lab animals. Dr.
SCIENCE
May 22, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
Here's a scientific finding that may knock you off your feet: At least 80 types of fungi reside on a typical person's heel, along with 60 between the toes and 40 on the toenail. Altogether, the feet are home to more than 100 types of fungus, more than any other area of the human body, according to a study published Wednesday by the journal Nature. And that fungal fellowship is in constant motion as we walk through life. It may sound icky, but many of the fungi on our skin serve a very useful purpose, said study leader Julie Segre, a geneticist at the National Human Genome Research Institute in Bethesda, Md. "One of the major functions of healthy fungi is to prevent pathogenic fungi from adhering to our skin," where they can cause athlete's foot, plantar warts and stubborn toenail infections, she said.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Taking an acetaminophen tablet daily for at least five years reduces the risk of developing prostate cancer by 38%, researchers from the American Cancer Society reported Monday. Using the drug, the best-known form of which is Tylenol, also reduces the risk of the more aggressive form of prostate cancer by 51%, the team reported in the online version of the journal Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. Previous research has shown that daily doses of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | From United Press International
The federal government and the American Cancer Society on Monday announced a stop-smoking drive expected to reach more than one-fifth of the U.S. population and at least 15 million smokers. The National Cancer Institute estimates it will spend $116.5 million on the project, which is being billed as "the world's largest" effort to reduce smoking.
NEWS
April 26, 1989
U.S. cancer researchers announced a joint cancer study with the Soviet Union. Scientists from the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston said the study--three separate clinical trials--will be the first of its kind. It will involve carefully monitored trials of new therapies on several hundred Soviet and American patients over two years, said Dr. Emil Frei III, director of the Dana-Farber institute, which is affiliated with Harvard Medical School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1988
A $200,000 award for pioneering work in cancer therapy will be presented to Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, chief of the surgical branch of the National Cancer Institute, it was announced by the Hammer Prize Foundation. Dr. Armand Hammer, who is chairman of the President's Cancer Panel, will give the special Hammer Cancer Prize for Adoptive Immunotherapy to Rosenberg at a luncheon Tuesday at the Westwood headquarters of Occidental Petroleum Corp.
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