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NEWS
March 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Frying, broiling and barbecuing produce potentially carcinogenic compounds in meat, chicken and fish, but microwaving, stewing and poaching do not, the National Cancer Institute said in reporting on a laboratory study. Researchers at the institute's Division of Cancer Etiology found that cooking at high temperatures and for a long time produced compounds that caused cancer in monkeys and other lab animals. Dr.
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SCIENCE
May 22, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
Here's a scientific finding that may knock you off your feet: At least 80 types of fungi reside on a typical person's heel, along with 60 between the toes and 40 on the toenail. Altogether, the feet are home to more than 100 types of fungus, more than any other area of the human body, according to a study published Wednesday by the journal Nature. And that fungal fellowship is in constant motion as we walk through life. It may sound icky, but many of the fungi on our skin serve a very useful purpose, said study leader Julie Segre, a geneticist at the National Human Genome Research Institute in Bethesda, Md. "One of the major functions of healthy fungi is to prevent pathogenic fungi from adhering to our skin," where they can cause athlete's foot, plantar warts and stubborn toenail infections, she said.
SCIENCE
February 12, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Women considering a mastectomy after being diagnosed with breast cancer often face a difficult decision: whether to remove their healthy breast as well. A new study should make it easier for some of these women to make up their minds. It concludes that patients with a dangerous mutation in their BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene were able to cut their risk of dying from breast cancer nearly in half by opting to remove both breasts. The BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes contain instructions for producing tumor suppressor proteins, which repair damaged DNA and keep cells from turning cancerous.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
This year's Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, released online Monday, brought Americans good news and bad.  Extending a trend since the early 1990s, authors reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that cancer deaths have continued to fall in the United States, with rates declining 1.5% per year for all cancers, in both sexes combined, from 2000 to 2009.  Deaths from the most common cancers - including lung,...
BUSINESS
February 8, 2012
A panel of cancer experts voted against a new use for Amgen Inc.'s Xgeva in prostate cancer on Wednesday, saying the drug's ability to slow the spread of the disease did not translate into meaningful benefits for patients. The Food and Drug Administration's cancer drug panel voted 12 to 1 that the benefits of the drug did not outweigh its risks, which included bone disease in about 6% of patients. The FDA is not required to follow the group's advice, although it often does. Xgeva is already approved to prevent fractures in cancerous bones, and for osteoporosis, in a different formulation called Prolia.
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | From United Press International
The federal government and the American Cancer Society on Monday announced a stop-smoking drive expected to reach more than one-fifth of the U.S. population and at least 15 million smokers. The National Cancer Institute estimates it will spend $116.5 million on the project, which is being billed as "the world's largest" effort to reduce smoking.
NEWS
April 26, 1989
U.S. cancer researchers announced a joint cancer study with the Soviet Union. Scientists from the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston said the study--three separate clinical trials--will be the first of its kind. It will involve carefully monitored trials of new therapies on several hundred Soviet and American patients over two years, said Dr. Emil Frei III, director of the Dana-Farber institute, which is affiliated with Harvard Medical School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1988
A $200,000 award for pioneering work in cancer therapy will be presented to Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, chief of the surgical branch of the National Cancer Institute, it was announced by the Hammer Prize Foundation. Dr. Armand Hammer, who is chairman of the President's Cancer Panel, will give the special Hammer Cancer Prize for Adoptive Immunotherapy to Rosenberg at a luncheon Tuesday at the Westwood headquarters of Occidental Petroleum Corp.
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