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NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong, Los Angeles Times
Pancreatic cancer, the most aggressive type of cancer, has claimed the life of astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. Ride died Monday at age of 61 after a 17-month-long battle against the disease. Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths for people in the United States. It has the lowest survival rate of any type of cancer - according to the American Cancer Society, the one-year survival rate is 20% for all stages of pancreatic cancer combined.
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NEWS
November 5, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Test-tube experiments at a National Institutes of Health laboratory show evidence that a drug called hydroxyurea may block or slow the replication of the AIDS virus, researchers report. In a study published in the journal Science, researchers at the National Cancer Institute report that HIV, which causes AIDS, is unable to reproduce in cells exposed to hydroxyurea, a cancer drug that has been used for 30 years.
NEWS
February 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guidelines for breast cancer screening could be changed by some medical organizations once they fully analyze new studies showing mammograms may provide little benefit for women before age 50, officials said. Dr. Gerald P. Murphy, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society, said his group is examining the new studies, but "not all of the information has been evaluated, and there are no conclusions that can be made on this as yet."
NEWS
May 8, 1987
A controversial drug to treat two lethal types of cancer has won approval from the Food and Drug Administration for wider trials in humans, it was announced. An FDA spokeswoman said the agency will permit the National Cancer Institute to expand the use of interleukin-2 to a larger number of patients with advanced melanoma and kidney cancer. The treatment will be available to patients selected for participation in tests at NCI-approved cancer centers.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Frying, broiling and barbecuing produce potentially carcinogenic compounds in meat, chicken and fish, but microwaving, stewing and poaching do not, the National Cancer Institute said in reporting on a laboratory study. Researchers at the institute's Division of Cancer Etiology found that cooking at high temperatures and for a long time produced compounds that caused cancer in monkeys and other lab animals. Dr.
SCIENCE
February 12, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Women considering a mastectomy after being diagnosed with breast cancer often face a difficult decision: whether to remove their healthy breast as well. A new study should make it easier for some of these women to make up their minds. It concludes that patients with a dangerous mutation in their BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene were able to cut their risk of dying from breast cancer nearly in half by opting to remove both breasts. The BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes contain instructions for producing tumor suppressor proteins, which repair damaged DNA and keep cells from turning cancerous.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The long-debunked idea that abortions can contribute to breast cancer is reappearing amid the outpouring of comments this week on Susan G. Komen for the Cure's decision to stop funding Planned Parenthood breast-health programs. Here's one comment on Komen's Facebook page: "Also! Breast cancer is linked to abortions!!! More and more studied are pointing to abortions for a huge risk factor for BC, why should SGK support something that raises the chances of what they wasn't destroyed?
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