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NEWS
January 10, 2013 | By Rosie Mestel
Between 1940 and 1971, many pregnant women were treated with a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol -- commonly known as DES -- to prevent miscarriage and other complications. The drug didn't work for that purpose, but it did have biological effects on the women who took it,  as well as their children. On Wednesday, four sisters who'd been exposed to DES in the womb reached a settlement with one of the drug's principal makers, Eli Lilly & Co., during a federal trial in Boston, the Associated Press reported.
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BUSINESS
February 8, 2012
A panel of cancer experts voted against a new use for Amgen Inc.'s Xgeva in prostate cancer on Wednesday, saying the drug's ability to slow the spread of the disease did not translate into meaningful benefits for patients. The Food and Drug Administration's cancer drug panel voted 12 to 1 that the benefits of the drug did not outweigh its risks, which included bone disease in about 6% of patients. The FDA is not required to follow the group's advice, although it often does. Xgeva is already approved to prevent fractures in cancerous bones, and for osteoporosis, in a different formulation called Prolia.
NEWS
November 4, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
If you're sitting down, you might want to stand up after reading this: Nearly 100,000 cases of cancer could be prevented in the U.S. each year if we all spent less time sitting in our cars, at our desks and on our couches. Even people who exercise daily can increase their risk of cancer by remaining sedentary for extended periods of time, researchers said Thursday at the annual meeting of the American Institute for Cancer Research focused on food, nutrition and physical activity . Using data from the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics , researchers estimated that up to 49,000 cases of breast cancer and 43,000 cases of colon cancer each year are tied to lack of physical activity.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
You would think that people who were diagnosed with melanoma -- the most deadly form of skin cancer -- would be meticulously careful about using sunscreen, avoiding tanning salons and generally protecting their skin. You would be wrong, researchers said Monday. Melanoma tumors develop in the skin cells that make melanin, the brown pigment that protects skin from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is the least common type of skin cancer, but it can be the most dangerous.
SCIENCE
July 18, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Most patients diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer will live just as long if they simply watch their cancers rather than have them surgically removed, according to the results of a landmark clinical trial that could upend the medical approach to a disease that affects 1 in 6 men. The study, which focused on cancers still confined to the prostate, should reassure patients who want to avoid distressing side effects of surgery - such as urinary incontinence...
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The long-debunked idea that abortions can contribute to breast cancer is reappearing amid the outpouring of comments this week on Susan G. Komen for the Cure's decision to stop funding Planned Parenthood breast-health programs. Here's one comment on Komen's Facebook page: "Also! Breast cancer is linked to abortions!!! More and more studied are pointing to abortions for a huge risk factor for BC, why should SGK support something that raises the chances of what they wasn't destroyed?
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Test-tube experiments at a National Institutes of Health laboratory show evidence that a drug called hydroxyurea may block or slow the replication of the AIDS virus, researchers report. In a study published in the journal Science, researchers at the National Cancer Institute report that HIV, which causes AIDS, is unable to reproduce in cells exposed to hydroxyurea, a cancer drug that has been used for 30 years.
NEWS
February 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guidelines for breast cancer screening could be changed by some medical organizations once they fully analyze new studies showing mammograms may provide little benefit for women before age 50, officials said. Dr. Gerald P. Murphy, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society, said his group is examining the new studies, but "not all of the information has been evaluated, and there are no conclusions that can be made on this as yet."
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