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NEWS
March 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Frying, broiling and barbecuing produce potentially carcinogenic compounds in meat, chicken and fish, but microwaving, stewing and poaching do not, the National Cancer Institute said in reporting on a laboratory study. Researchers at the institute's Division of Cancer Etiology found that cooking at high temperatures and for a long time produced compounds that caused cancer in monkeys and other lab animals. Dr.
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NEWS
January 10, 2013 | By Rosie Mestel
Between 1940 and 1971, many pregnant women were treated with a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol -- commonly known as DES -- to prevent miscarriage and other complications. The drug didn't work for that purpose, but it did have biological effects on the women who took it,  as well as their children. On Wednesday, four sisters who'd been exposed to DES in the womb reached a settlement with one of the drug's principal makers, Eli Lilly & Co., during a federal trial in Boston, the Associated Press reported.
SCIENCE
May 22, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
Here's a scientific finding that may knock you off your feet: At least 80 types of fungi reside on a typical person's heel, along with 60 between the toes and 40 on the toenail. Altogether, the feet are home to more than 100 types of fungus, more than any other area of the human body, according to a study published Wednesday by the journal Nature. And that fungal fellowship is in constant motion as we walk through life. It may sound icky, but many of the fungi on our skin serve a very useful purpose, said study leader Julie Segre, a geneticist at the National Human Genome Research Institute in Bethesda, Md. "One of the major functions of healthy fungi is to prevent pathogenic fungi from adhering to our skin," where they can cause athlete's foot, plantar warts and stubborn toenail infections, she said.
NEWS
September 10, 2010
Asian Americans are known to have disproportionate numbers of liver cancers because of the high incidence of hepatitis B in that population, but new data indicate that Laotian Americans and Hmong Americans have even higher numbers and are more than twice as likely as other Asian Americans to die of it. Moreover, the disease tends to be diagnosed in those two groups at a late stage when it has already spread and they are less likely to receive treatment, UC...
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
You would think that people who were diagnosed with melanoma -- the most deadly form of skin cancer -- would be meticulously careful about using sunscreen, avoiding tanning salons and generally protecting their skin. You would be wrong, researchers said Monday. Melanoma tumors develop in the skin cells that make melanin, the brown pigment that protects skin from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is the least common type of skin cancer, but it can be the most dangerous.
SCIENCE
July 18, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Most patients diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer will live just as long if they simply watch their cancers rather than have them surgically removed, according to the results of a landmark clinical trial that could upend the medical approach to a disease that affects 1 in 6 men. The study, which focused on cancers still confined to the prostate, should reassure patients who want to avoid distressing side effects of surgery - such as urinary incontinence...
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | From United Press International
The federal government and the American Cancer Society on Monday announced a stop-smoking drive expected to reach more than one-fifth of the U.S. population and at least 15 million smokers. The National Cancer Institute estimates it will spend $116.5 million on the project, which is being billed as "the world's largest" effort to reduce smoking.
NEWS
April 26, 1989
U.S. cancer researchers announced a joint cancer study with the Soviet Union. Scientists from the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston said the study--three separate clinical trials--will be the first of its kind. It will involve carefully monitored trials of new therapies on several hundred Soviet and American patients over two years, said Dr. Emil Frei III, director of the Dana-Farber institute, which is affiliated with Harvard Medical School.
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