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National Cancer Institute

NEWS
May 8, 1987
A controversial drug to treat two lethal types of cancer has won approval from the Food and Drug Administration for wider trials in humans, it was announced. An FDA spokeswoman said the agency will permit the National Cancer Institute to expand the use of interleukin-2 to a larger number of patients with advanced melanoma and kidney cancer. The treatment will be available to patients selected for participation in tests at NCI-approved cancer centers.
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NEWS
March 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Frying, broiling and barbecuing produce potentially carcinogenic compounds in meat, chicken and fish, but microwaving, stewing and poaching do not, the National Cancer Institute said in reporting on a laboratory study. Researchers at the institute's Division of Cancer Etiology found that cooking at high temperatures and for a long time produced compounds that caused cancer in monkeys and other lab animals. Dr.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
You would think that people who were diagnosed with melanoma -- the most deadly form of skin cancer -- would be meticulously careful about using sunscreen, avoiding tanning salons and generally protecting their skin. You would be wrong, researchers said Monday. Melanoma tumors develop in the skin cells that make melanin, the brown pigment that protects skin from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is the least common type of skin cancer, but it can be the most dangerous.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The long-debunked idea that abortions can contribute to breast cancer is reappearing amid the outpouring of comments this week on Susan G. Komen for the Cure's decision to stop funding Planned Parenthood breast-health programs. Here's one comment on Komen's Facebook page: "Also! Breast cancer is linked to abortions!!! More and more studied are pointing to abortions for a huge risk factor for BC, why should SGK support something that raises the chances of what they wasn't destroyed?
NEWS
January 10, 2013 | By Rosie Mestel
Between 1940 and 1971, many pregnant women were treated with a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol -- commonly known as DES -- to prevent miscarriage and other complications. The drug didn't work for that purpose, but it did have biological effects on the women who took it,  as well as their children. On Wednesday, four sisters who'd been exposed to DES in the womb reached a settlement with one of the drug's principal makers, Eli Lilly & Co., during a federal trial in Boston, the Associated Press reported.
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | From United Press International
The federal government and the American Cancer Society on Monday announced a stop-smoking drive expected to reach more than one-fifth of the U.S. population and at least 15 million smokers. The National Cancer Institute estimates it will spend $116.5 million on the project, which is being billed as "the world's largest" effort to reduce smoking.
NEWS
April 26, 1989
U.S. cancer researchers announced a joint cancer study with the Soviet Union. Scientists from the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston said the study--three separate clinical trials--will be the first of its kind. It will involve carefully monitored trials of new therapies on several hundred Soviet and American patients over two years, said Dr. Emil Frei III, director of the Dana-Farber institute, which is affiliated with Harvard Medical School.
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