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NEWS
May 13, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was no ship of fools but there was enough foolishness aboard to sink a ship. Sailing on the Norwegian Cruise Line's luxury liner from Miami to the Bahamas and back were 125 of the world's funniest people--the creators of a cast of cartoon characters that make millions laugh each day. The characters are some of our closest friends--Cathy, Crock, that crank bus driver Ed Crankshaft, Momma, Beetle Bailey, the Wizard of Id, Wiley, Thor and the Clumsy Carp from B.C.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2012 | Dennis McLellan
The lead character in Jim Unger's offbeat cartoon panel "Herman" is a rumpled, middle-aged everyman, with a bulging belly and a potato-sized nose, dealing with the frustrations and absurdities of everyday life. In one panel, Unger's lumpy hero wears an apron and washes the dishes as his wife glowers over his shoulder. The caption says, "It's one small step for a man, one giant leap toward a divorce. " The award-winning British-born cartoonist had a good idea why his widely syndicated cartoon was so popular.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2007
Cartoon prize: "Pearls Before Swine," created by Stephan Pastis, has been named newspaper comic strip of the year by the National Cartoonists Society. The strip, carried in The Times and about 400 other newspapers, also won the award in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2007
Cartoon prize: "Pearls Before Swine," created by Stephan Pastis, has been named newspaper comic strip of the year by the National Cartoonists Society. The strip, carried in The Times and about 400 other newspapers, also won the award in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Top of the 'Toons: Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Mike Peters, creator of the CBS Saturday-morning cartoon and syndicated comic strip "Mother Goose and Grimm," has been named the outstanding cartoonist of 1991 by the National Cartoonists Society. Peters gets the top honor, the Reuben Award, from his colleagues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1996
Your article Aug. 19 ("Drawing Fire") concerning the activities of a Woodland Hills cartoonist who has been posting caricatures of me on the Internet was amusing but not particularly relevant to the crucial issues facing voters in the 24th Congressional District. The article accurately reports that I voted in favor of the cartoonists and exempted them from a sales tax that had been in place since 1939; I expressed bewilderment over why one cartoonist organized an attack on me anyway. Republican cartoonist Daryl Cagle, who has organized the Web page, said that he was targeting me because I am running for Congress, which seems to answer the question succinctly.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Jim Davis, creator of fat cat Garfield, has been named Cartoonist of the Year for 1990 by the National Cartoonists Society. After six years as a nominee, Davis of Albany, Ind., won the Reuben--the cartoon world's equivalent of the Oscar--for the cynical, overfed Garfield, featured on television specials and many novelty items as well as newspaper cartoons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2012 | Dennis McLellan
The lead character in Jim Unger's offbeat cartoon panel "Herman" is a rumpled, middle-aged everyman, with a bulging belly and a potato-sized nose, dealing with the frustrations and absurdities of everyday life. In one panel, Unger's lumpy hero wears an apron and washes the dishes as his wife glowers over his shoulder. The caption says, "It's one small step for a man, one giant leap toward a divorce. " The award-winning British-born cartoonist had a good idea why his widely syndicated cartoon was so popular.
NEWS
November 24, 2005
Acknowledging the "subjective" in Geoff Boucher's "highly subjective guide to some of the best graphic novels" does not erase my concern that Boucher's article ["Serious About Comics," Nov. 17], and the exhibition that inspired his article, treat women cartoonists as a side note. In the late 1980s, I began to notice that most newspapers, including The Times, published only two comics by women -- the same two comics, out of a total of 36, that appear in today's Times: Lynn Johnston's "For Better or For Worse" and Cathy Guisewite's "Cathy."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Cartoonist Jim Unger is taking a two-month leave of absence from his popular comic strip "Herman" for health reasons. During Unger's hiatus, the Universal Press Syndicate will distribute "classic releases of the panel in both its daily and Sunday formats," starting Monday. A one-panel strip with no recurring characters that depicts a skewed world of dumpy people, whiny little kids and obnoxious pets, "Herman" has twice been named "Best Panel Comic Strip" by the National Cartoonists' Society.
NEWS
November 24, 2005
Acknowledging the "subjective" in Geoff Boucher's "highly subjective guide to some of the best graphic novels" does not erase my concern that Boucher's article ["Serious About Comics," Nov. 17], and the exhibition that inspired his article, treat women cartoonists as a side note. In the late 1980s, I began to notice that most newspapers, including The Times, published only two comics by women -- the same two comics, out of a total of 36, that appear in today's Times: Lynn Johnston's "For Better or For Worse" and Cathy Guisewite's "Cathy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1996
Your article Aug. 19 ("Drawing Fire") concerning the activities of a Woodland Hills cartoonist who has been posting caricatures of me on the Internet was amusing but not particularly relevant to the crucial issues facing voters in the 24th Congressional District. The article accurately reports that I voted in favor of the cartoonists and exempted them from a sales tax that had been in place since 1939; I expressed bewilderment over why one cartoonist organized an attack on me anyway. Republican cartoonist Daryl Cagle, who has organized the Web page, said that he was targeting me because I am running for Congress, which seems to answer the question succinctly.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Top of the 'Toons: Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Mike Peters, creator of the CBS Saturday-morning cartoon and syndicated comic strip "Mother Goose and Grimm," has been named the outstanding cartoonist of 1991 by the National Cartoonists Society. Peters gets the top honor, the Reuben Award, from his colleagues.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was no ship of fools but there was enough foolishness aboard to sink a ship. Sailing on the Norwegian Cruise Line's luxury liner from Miami to the Bahamas and back were 125 of the world's funniest people--the creators of a cast of cartoon characters that make millions laugh each day. The characters are some of our closest friends--Cathy, Crock, that crank bus driver Ed Crankshaft, Momma, Beetle Bailey, the Wizard of Id, Wiley, Thor and the Clumsy Carp from B.C.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Jim Davis, creator of fat cat Garfield, has been named Cartoonist of the Year for 1990 by the National Cartoonists Society. After six years as a nominee, Davis of Albany, Ind., won the Reuben--the cartoon world's equivalent of the Oscar--for the cynical, overfed Garfield, featured on television specials and many novelty items as well as newspaper cartoons.
NEWS
November 9, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Bill Hoest, whose award-winning comic strip "The Lockhorns," has had Leroy and Loretta Lockhorn at odds for two decades, has died at age 62. Hoest, of Lloyd Neck, died Monday of lymphoma at New York Medical Center. "The Lockhorns," which celebrated its 20th anniversary in September, is syndicated to more than 500 newspapers worldwide. Hoest also produced the comic strips "What a Guy!"
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