Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNational Cathedral
IN THE NEWS

National Cathedral

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The earthquake-damaged National Cathedral in Washington will reopen to visitors and worshipers Nov. 12 after spending $25 million on initial repairs. Officials at the Episcopal church warn it may take "tens of millions" of dollars more and numerous years to restore and fix the building. An online statement from cathedral officials says the need to stabilize parts of the building, including some towers, was why it took so long to reopen. But this building is used to long construction periods -- it took 80 years to complete after the cornerstone was laid in 1907.  Where will the millions for ongoing repairs come from?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON -- Cleaning and preservation crews have finished removing green paint that was splashed on the iconic statue inside the Lincoln Memorial three weeks ago, the National Park Service announced. The vandalism was discovered on July 26 after someone threw grew paint onto the giant gleaming seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln, staining parts of the chest down to the base. Most of the paint was removed with a power wash that same day, but traces remained on the porous marble through several further cleaning attempts.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Washington National Cathedral in the nation's capital received a bequest of about $15 million, the largest in its 92-year history. It was willed by Katherine Thomas, who came from Emlenton, Pa., and lived in suburban Rockville, Md. Born Katherine Gregory, she died in 1994 at age 96. She also left $7.5 million to St. Albans School, which, like the cathedral, belongs to the Protestant Episcopal Cathedral Foundation.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2013 | By Marina Villeneuve
WASHINGTON - A woman was taken into custody Monday after someone splashed paint on two chapels inside the Washington National Cathedral, the third such incident in the nation's capital in four days. The Lincoln Memorial was defaced with paint Friday, as was a statue at one of the Smithsonian museums on the National Mall on Monday. The woman, whose identity was not immediately released, is expected to be charged with defacing public property in the cathedral incident, said District of Columbia Metropolitan Police spokesman Paul Metcalf.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | From Times wire services
Washington Cathedral, 82 years in the building and one of the glories of the capital's skyline, moved a step nearer to completion today as the last load of limestone was delivered for the second-largest cathedral in the United States. "I thought once I wasn't going to be able to see it finished," said Otto Epps, the project's head laborer and a veteran of 37 years of work on the cathedral. "This is a great day," said the Rt. Rev. John T. Walker, Episcopal bishop of Washington who said a prayer of thanksgiving at a rain-dampened ceremony on the steps of the cathedral, known to tourists as National Cathedral.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2008 | Adam Bernstein, Washington Post
Francis B. Sayre Jr., who as dean of Washington National Cathedral for 27 years oversaw much of its completion and used his pulpit to confront McCarthyism, racial tensions and the Vietnam War, died Oct. 3 at his home on Martha's Vineyard, Mass. He was 93 and had diabetes. Sayre, whose grandfather was President Wilson, was appointed to the cathedral in 1951 and quickly became a leading national voice of conscience.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For fifth-generation stonecarver Vincent Palumbo, working on the construction of the Washington National Cathedral over the past 30 years has been nothing short of an act of worship--and love. "You work and you pray, work and pray," Palumbo muses, gesturing with his thick hands, which are as dusty as the chisels that fill his workshop at the building's base. "And always there is the feeling--all these things you do because . . . it is a church. It's for God. It's for Christ."
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON -- Cleaning and preservation crews have finished removing green paint that was splashed on the iconic statue inside the Lincoln Memorial three weeks ago, the National Park Service announced. The vandalism was discovered on July 26 after someone threw grew paint onto the giant gleaming seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln, staining parts of the chest down to the base. Most of the paint was removed with a power wash that same day, but traces remained on the porous marble through several further cleaning attempts.
NEWS
June 15, 1986 | PENNY PAGANO, Times Staff Writer
When George Washington and architect Pierre L'Enfant were planning the capital city in the late 1700s, they happened to visit Treasury Secretary Joseph Nourse, whose home was on the highest point of land in the area. Nourse told his visitors about his dream of seeing a church there one day. And, to that end, a small box containing 50 gold dollars and a note designating the money "for a free church on Alban's Hill" was found after the death of Nourse's granddaughter, who shared his goal.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2005 | Emma Vaughn and Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writers
President Bush, fresh from his fourth visit to the Gulf Coast, told an audience at the National Cathedral on Friday that he would use the rebuilding process to correct the poverty born of racial discrimination that left so many of Hurricane Katrina's victims vulnerable. "The greatest hardship fell upon citizens already facing lives of struggle: the elderly, the vulnerable and the poor," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A bearded young comedy writer espousing progressive views in Hollywood in the early 1970s might not have surprised anyone. But when the same man, who is now the Very Rev. Gary Hall, started advocating the same views from the Washington National Cathedral's pulpit, people noticed. Shortly after Hall became the Episcopal cathedral's 10th dean in October, the church's leaders announced the cathedral would start performing same-sex marriages. The ensuing wave of news stories surprised Hall, who said he has been blessing same-sex relationships since 1990, when he was a priest at Pasadena's All Saints Episcopal Church.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Supporters of gay marriage are exultant that the Washington National Cathedral has announced that it will perform same-sex weddings.  It's not really a surprise. The Episcopal Church to which the cathedral belongs approved a rite for same-sex blessings in 2012 and same-sex marriage is legal in the District of Columbia. So why all the breathless coverage of the announcement? It has to do with the “national” in the popular name of the church (which is officially called the Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul)
NATIONAL
December 5, 2012 | By Timothy M. Phelps, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The earth shook under the nation's church, snapping some of the 53 carillon bells' cables and causing them to ring in forbidding disharmony. Outside, cracks appeared on some of the wing-like flying buttresses supporting the 100-foot walls and intricate stone arches that mark the Washington National Cathedral as one of the world's greatest Gothic churches. Still the ground shuddered, coursing energy upward to the grimacing or mirthful gargoyles and the 152 pinnacles that rise like twirled candy above the sheet lead roof.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The earthquake-damaged National Cathedral in Washington will reopen to visitors and worshipers Nov. 12 after spending $25 million on initial repairs. Officials at the Episcopal church warn it may take "tens of millions" of dollars more and numerous years to restore and fix the building. An online statement from cathedral officials says the need to stabilize parts of the building, including some towers, was why it took so long to reopen. But this building is used to long construction periods -- it took 80 years to complete after the cornerstone was laid in 1907.  Where will the millions for ongoing repairs come from?
NATIONAL
August 24, 2011 | By Melanie Mason, Richard Simon and Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
Buildings emptied, monuments closed, trains and planes were halted, and people ran in terror into the streets after a rare earthquake measuring 5.8 jolted the eastern United States, stunning millions who consider temblors a California problem and who, in many cases, simply couldn't believe what was happening. "This is an ACTUAL EARTHQUAKE ALERT," read a notice posted on New York's emergency management website, minutes after the quake sent the city's high-rises and bridges swaying.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2008 | Adam Bernstein, Washington Post
Francis B. Sayre Jr., who as dean of Washington National Cathedral for 27 years oversaw much of its completion and used his pulpit to confront McCarthyism, racial tensions and the Vietnam War, died Oct. 3 at his home on Martha's Vineyard, Mass. He was 93 and had diabetes. Sayre, whose grandfather was President Wilson, was appointed to the cathedral in 1951 and quickly became a leading national voice of conscience.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2001
Christopher Knight joins an ignoble line of cynics and curmudgeons who denigrate the value of the arts whenever tough national issues emerge or budgets tighten ("What Exactly Can Art Heal?," Nov. 4). He strangely asserts that "faith in art's capacity to heal is peculiar." Rather, the power of the arts to heal is intrinsic. One has only to have heard the voice of Denyce Graves during the National Cathedral memorial service to see how the arts can heal. Or to have seen the crayon drawings and pictures sent to New York City families and rescue workers to witness their therapeutic effect.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Supporters of gay marriage are exultant that the Washington National Cathedral has announced that it will perform same-sex weddings.  It's not really a surprise. The Episcopal Church to which the cathedral belongs approved a rite for same-sex blessings in 2012 and same-sex marriage is legal in the District of Columbia. So why all the breathless coverage of the announcement? It has to do with the “national” in the popular name of the church (which is officially called the Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul)
NATIONAL
September 17, 2005 | Emma Vaughn and Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writers
President Bush, fresh from his fourth visit to the Gulf Coast, told an audience at the National Cathedral on Friday that he would use the rebuilding process to correct the poverty born of racial discrimination that left so many of Hurricane Katrina's victims vulnerable. "The greatest hardship fell upon citizens already facing lives of struggle: the elderly, the vulnerable and the poor," he said.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2004 | Faye Fiore, Vicki Kemper and Daryl Kelley, Times Staff Writers
Ronald Wilson Reagan, the nation's 40th president, was buried on a golden Southern California hilltop Friday, after a funeral in Washington National Cathedral attended by hundreds of world leaders, past and present. The ceremonies ended a week of mourning and majesty that honored the uniquely American figure who was credited with hastening the end of the Cold War. Reagan died June 5 at 93.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|