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BUSINESS
August 17, 1989 | JANE APPLEGATE, Times Staff Writer
Mainstream companies trying to do business with American Indian-owned firms or tribal leaders frequently find it frustrating. But, American Indian business advisers say, companies would have more luck if they observed the proper protocol in dealing with Indian business owners. "Most people don't have any clue as to how to deal with Indian people," said Georgia Peterson, an Oneida Indian who owns San Pedro-based Oneida Information Systems.
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BUSINESS
August 17, 1989 | JANE APPLEGATE, Times Staff Writer
Mainstream companies trying to do business with American Indian-owned firms or tribal leaders frequently find it frustrating. But, American Indian business advisers say, companies would have more luck if they observed the proper protocol in dealing with Indian business owners. "Most people don't have any clue as to how to deal with Indian people," said Georgia Peterson, an Oneida Indian who owns San Pedro-based Oneida Information Systems.
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BUSINESS
April 13, 1990
Ten winners have been selected by the Los Angeles District of the Small Business Administration to be honored at a luncheon during Small Business Week, May 6 to 12. The advocate awards are part of the events surrounding the SBA's Small Business Week, a tradition that began in 1964. This year's theme is Small Business: Leading America Into the 21st Century. Barry M. Gump, chief executive of Andy Gump Inc. in Canyon Country, was chosen Small Business Person of the Year.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of noncorporate U.S. businesses owned by Asians and Pacific Islanders grew by 30% from 1992 to 1997, four times faster than the nation's overall business growth rate, according to U.S. census data released today. Not surprisingly, California--especially Southern California--continued to dominate the Asian business landscape, with California claiming more than one-third of all such businesses in the nation.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | JOHN HURST and RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Joining the Cherokee Nation has been worth millions of dollars in construction work to Jon McGrath. The blue-eyed, fair-skinned contractor from Tulsa, Okla., who is 1/64 American Indian, has obtained $19 million in minority subcontracts on the rapid transit system in Los Angeles--more than any other "disadvantaged" firm. McGrath's Cherokee ancestry is the equivalent of having a great-great-great-great-grandparent who was a full-blooded Indian.
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