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October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
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NEWS
October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
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NEWS
October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
SCIENCE
January 28, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
A crushing medical bill can cause money problems not just for a cash-strapped patient but for his or her entire family. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show more than one in four U.S. families recently experienced a financial burden due to the cost of medical care. Among Americans who participated in the National Health Interview Survey in 2012, 8.9% said they were currently having problems paying a medical bill and another 7.6% said they had been in that situation sometime in the previous 12 months.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Which Americans are least likely to be overweight or obese? Asian Americans, by a long shot. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal that 38.6% of Asian American adults have a body mass index over 25, the threshold for being considered overweight. That's far below the 66.7% rate among whites, 76.7% rate among blacks and 78.8% rate among Latinos. Some Asian American adults are more likely to be overweight than others. For instance, 43% of men have a BMI over 25, compared with 34.7% of women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Defying enduring stereotypes about black fatherhood, a federal survey of American parents shows that by most measures, black fathers who live with their children are just as involved as other dads who live with their kids - or more so. For instance, among fathers who lived with young children, 70% of black dads said they bathed, diapered or dressed those kids every day, compared with 60% of white fathers and 45% of Latino fathers, according to...
NEWS
November 26, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
When should a women have her first baby? A majority of Americans said age 25 or younger would be the ideal, according to a new survey.   Gallup recently polled 5,100 people and found that 58% said women should start having children in their early 20s or late teens.   Only 3% of respondents said 31 or older is the ideal time for a woman to have her first child.   In this teetering economy -- and with the unemployment rate for 20- to 24-year-olds hovering around 13% -- the survey sparks the question: Exactly who thinks 25 is "ideal"?
NEWS
August 15, 1988 | Associated Press
Americans had more babies in 1987--about 3.8 million--than in any other year in nearly a quarter-century, the National Center for Health Statistics reported today.
SCIENCE
August 29, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
About one in 25 American adults takes sleeping pills to help them fall asleep and stay asleep at night, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Researchers from the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics examined surveys of adults ages 20 and older who were asked whether they had taken a prescription sleep aid in the previous 30 days. The experts found some distinct patterns among sleeping pill users: -- Women were more likely to use sleeping pills than men (5% of women used them, along with 3.1% of men)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
As Sandra Spath glanced around the Santa Monica yoga class for soon-to-be mothers, the thought that had nagged her that day evaporated. "I wasn't even the oldest one," Spath said. Just a few weeks before she turned 40, Spath gave birth to a boy - and joined the growing ranks of women becoming mothers later in life. Federal data show that women in their 40s are more likely to have babies now than at any time in more than four decades. Among American women ages 40 to 44, birthrates have hit their highest point since 1967, data recently released by the National Center for Health Statistics reveal.
HEALTH
January 30, 2012 | By Marta Zaraska, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you don't believe in horoscopes, you're in step with science. But that's not the same as saying the season of your birth cannot affect your fate. Hundreds of studies, published in peer-reviewed journals, have suggested that the month a person is born in is associated with characteristics such as temperament, longevity and susceptibility to certain diseases. Scientists say that even though some of these findings are probably spurious - if you dig around in data, you will eventually find correlations just by chance - other effects are very likely real, triggered not by the alignment of the planets but by exposures during prenatal and early postnatal lives.
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