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October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
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NEWS
October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
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NEWS
October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
NEWS
August 15, 1988 | Associated Press
Americans had more babies in 1987--about 3.8 million--than in any other year in nearly a quarter-century, the National Center for Health Statistics reported today.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1989 | From Associated Press
Working women take about one more sick day a year than men, the National Center for Health Statistics reported in a new study Monday. Women averaged 5.5 lost work days a year, compared to 4.3 for men, in the analysis covering 1983 through 1985. John Gary Collins, one of the authors, declined to speculate on reasons for the difference, saying "there could be many possibilities." He said comparative figures for men and women, which the National Center for Health Statistics had not collected before, were included in its new study because women now comprise such a large portion of the work force.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1989 | From Times wire services
Working women take about one more sick day per year than men, the National Center for Health Statistics reported in a new study today. Women averaged 5.5 lost work days per year, compared to 4.3 missed days for men, in the analysis covering 1983 through 1985. John Gary Collins, one of the authors, declined to speculate on reasons for the difference, saying "there could be many possibilities." He said that comparative figures for men and women, which the National Center for Health Statistics had not collected before, were included in its new study because women now make up such a large portion of the work force.
NEWS
May 9, 1986
More than nine-tenths of elderly people who live alone have visits or telephone chats with family and friends, social support that may help them live longer, says a study released by the National Center for Health Statistics. There is evidence that "people who have a lot of friends and relatives and who see a lot of them are likely to live longer than those who seldom visit with friends or relatives . . . ," the report said.
HEALTH
December 14, 1998
The facts and figures on flu in America, according to the most recent statistics (1994): * Number of deaths annually: 607 (1996) * Number of cases reported annually: 90.4 million * Number of cases per 100 people: 35 * Number of restricted-activity days due to flu: 315.4 million * Number of bed days due to flu: 170 million * Number of work-loss days due to flu: 69.3 million. Source: National Center for Health Statistics
HEALTH
March 18, 2011
An estimated 62 million U.S. women are in their childbearing years. Of those, 62% use some kind of contraception. Among those who don't, 31% are pregnant, trying to get pregnant, postpartum, sterile or not sexually active. The other 7% take their chances. Among those using contraceptives, here's what they use: The pill 28% Sterilization 27.1% Condom 16.1% Vasectomy 9.9% IUD 5.5% Withdrawal 5.2% Injectable Depo-Provera 3.2% Vaginal ring 2.4 Rhythm 0.9 Other: 0.6 Statistics from the National Center for Health Statistics and the Guttmacher Institute.
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Women who smoke during pregnancy are nearly twice as likely as nonsmokers to deliver underweight babies, the National Center for Health Statistics said, and low weight at birth is the single most important predictor of infant death. About one mother in five smoked while pregnant during 1989, the first year for which the information was available. The report said the babies of older mothers and of women who smoked heavily ran the highest risk of low birth weight.
HEALTH
December 21, 1998
How often do we in the U.S. visit our doctors? Statistics for 1995, the latest year for which they are available, tell us: * The number of visits annually: 697,082,000. * Average number of visits a year per person: 2.6. * Most frequent principal reason for visit: general medical exam, 47.3 million visits. * Most frequent diagnostic procedures performed: eye exams and Pap smears (more than 22,000 of each annually). * Most frequent principal diagnosis: acute respiratory infections, 31,856,976.
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