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October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
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NEWS
October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
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NEWS
October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
SCIENCE
January 28, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
A crushing medical bill can cause money problems not just for a cash-strapped patient but for his or her entire family. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show more than one in four U.S. families recently experienced a financial burden due to the cost of medical care. Among Americans who participated in the National Health Interview Survey in 2012, 8.9% said they were currently having problems paying a medical bill and another 7.6% said they had been in that situation sometime in the previous 12 months.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Which Americans are least likely to be overweight or obese? Asian Americans, by a long shot. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal that 38.6% of Asian American adults have a body mass index over 25, the threshold for being considered overweight. That's far below the 66.7% rate among whites, 76.7% rate among blacks and 78.8% rate among Latinos. Some Asian American adults are more likely to be overweight than others. For instance, 43% of men have a BMI over 25, compared with 34.7% of women.
SCIENCE
August 29, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
About one in 25 American adults takes sleeping pills to help them fall asleep and stay asleep at night, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Researchers from the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics examined surveys of adults ages 20 and older who were asked whether they had taken a prescription sleep aid in the previous 30 days. The experts found some distinct patterns among sleeping pill users: -- Women were more likely to use sleeping pills than men (5% of women used them, along with 3.1% of men)
NEWS
August 15, 1988 | Associated Press
Americans had more babies in 1987--about 3.8 million--than in any other year in nearly a quarter-century, the National Center for Health Statistics reported today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Defying enduring stereotypes about black fatherhood, a federal survey of American parents shows that by most measures, black fathers who live with their children are just as involved as other dads who live with their kids - or more so. For instance, among fathers who lived with young children, 70% of black dads said they bathed, diapered or dressed those kids every day, compared with 60% of white fathers and 45% of Latino fathers, according to...
HEALTH
March 18, 2011
An estimated 62 million U.S. women are in their childbearing years. Of those, 62% use some kind of contraception. Among those who don't, 31% are pregnant, trying to get pregnant, postpartum, sterile or not sexually active. The other 7% take their chances. Among those using contraceptives, here's what they use: The pill 28% Sterilization 27.1% Condom 16.1% Vasectomy 9.9% IUD 5.5% Withdrawal 5.2% Injectable Depo-Provera 3.2% Vaginal ring 2.4 Rhythm 0.9 Other: 0.6 Statistics from the National Center for Health Statistics and the Guttmacher Institute.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1989 | From Associated Press
Working women take about one more sick day a year than men, the National Center for Health Statistics reported in a new study Monday. Women averaged 5.5 lost work days a year, compared to 4.3 for men, in the analysis covering 1983 through 1985. John Gary Collins, one of the authors, declined to speculate on reasons for the difference, saying "there could be many possibilities." He said comparative figures for men and women, which the National Center for Health Statistics had not collected before, were included in its new study because women now comprise such a large portion of the work force.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1989 | From Times wire services
Working women take about one more sick day per year than men, the National Center for Health Statistics reported in a new study today. Women averaged 5.5 lost work days per year, compared to 4.3 missed days for men, in the analysis covering 1983 through 1985. John Gary Collins, one of the authors, declined to speculate on reasons for the difference, saying "there could be many possibilities." He said that comparative figures for men and women, which the National Center for Health Statistics had not collected before, were included in its new study because women now make up such a large portion of the work force.
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