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National Council Of Negro Women

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June 29, 1999 | BOOTH MOORE
More than 500 people attended the National Council of Negro Women's eighth annual Tribute to Black Women Community Leaders in Los Angeles on Saturday. The breakfast program was held to honor four California women for community service: Betty Davis-Walker and Shirley R. Miles of Los Angeles, Regina Jackson-Rasheed of Oakland, and Qiana Cerise Conley, a college student from Hawthorne.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Meda Chamberlain, a longtime local leader of the National Council of Negro Women who spent three decades working in tandem with major civil-rights activist Dorothy Height, has died. She was 94. Chamberlain, whose health had been in decline, died Aug. 5 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, her family said. As executive director of the Southern California region of the council, Chamberlain once said her "prize" accomplishment was overseeing the Black Family Reunion Celebration in Los Angeles from 1986 to 1995.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART
The National Council of Negro Women Inc., a nationally known leadership and service organization for black women, has opened a branch in the San Fernando Valley. The goal of the new chapter will be "to help promote and strengthen the traditional family structure and enhance education" in the African-American community, said Barbara Perkins, newly elected president of the Valley branch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2010 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart
Dorothy Height, who was called the queen mother of the civil rights movement through seven decades of advocacy for racial equality — including 41 years as president of the National Council of Negro Women — has died. She was 98. Height, who also played a key role in integrating the YWCA, died Tuesday of natural causes at Howard University Hospital in Washington, D.C., the council announced. Though not nearly as well known as her male contemporaries, Height was a steadfast presence in the civil rights movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1995 | TIM MAY
The San Fernando Valley branch of the National Council of Negro Women will sponsor a trip for young women to an art exhibition of images of African American men at the UCLA Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center. Registration is free, but reservations are required. The trip, which is limited to young women ages 14 through 19, will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Transportation, lunch and an exhibition catalogue will be provided.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Wanda Solomon, a single parent raising two young children, is tired of hearing people talk about the breakdown of the black family. Solomon's family is perfectly healthy, and so are many of those around her, she said. They just aren't getting the attention they deserve. Solomon hopes to change all that through a new organization called Single Parents of America, a group devoted to improving black family pride and awareness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1988 | KIMBERLY L. JACKSON and LUCILLE RENWICK, Times Staff Writers
For many, the second annual Black Family Reunion at Exposition Park was a chance to socialize with other black people, but for 18-year-old Jennifer Hamilton, it was an opportunity to learn about scholarships, meet role models and gain the confidence to apply to Spelman College in the spring. Hamilton, who lives in Perris, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1991 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Make up a story about the doll, the children were urged. What does she think about herself? Evelyn Henderson's hand shot up. "She's very talented, she's black and she's beautiful," the 7-year-old declared. The little girl was among dozens of children packed into a tent at the fifth annual Black Family Reunion Celebration at Exposition Park on Sunday. She was attending a "positive play" workshop, designed to build self-esteem and pride. "And what do you think about yourself?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1997 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a revival-style celebration Sunday, more than 200 people honored five African American women of the San Fernando Valley for their years of involvement in their churches, local charities and schools. Dorothy Caldwell, Ida Kinney, Dessa Robinson, Dorothy Bradford and Rosa Broadous--ages 71 to 89--were named "queen mothers" by the San Fernando Valley chapter of the National Council of Negro Women during the group's fifth annual Black History Celebration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1995 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a recent visit to Dakar, Senegal, Barbara Perkins played the role of the consummate ambassador. There she was at the third African-African American Summit, mingling with dignitaries, wrestling with tough social and political issues--and putting the San Fernando Valley on the map. "We're always having to raise the Valley flag," Perkins said from her home here. "A lot of times things are happening in Los Angeles and people just forget about [African Americans in] the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2010 | By Jocelyn Y. Stewart
Dorothy Height, who was called the queen mother of the civil rights movement through seven decades of advocacy for racial equality -- including 41 years as president of the National Council of Negro Women -- has died. She was 98. Height, who also played a key role in integrating the YWCA, died Tuesday of natural causes at Howard University Hospital in Washington, D.C., the council announced. Though not nearly as well known as her male contemporaries, Height was a steadfast presence in the civil rights movement.
NEWS
June 29, 1999 | BOOTH MOORE
More than 500 people attended the National Council of Negro Women's eighth annual Tribute to Black Women Community Leaders in Los Angeles on Saturday. The breakfast program was held to honor four California women for community service: Betty Davis-Walker and Shirley R. Miles of Los Angeles, Regina Jackson-Rasheed of Oakland, and Qiana Cerise Conley, a college student from Hawthorne.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1997 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a revival-style celebration Sunday, more than 200 people honored five African American women of the San Fernando Valley for their years of involvement in their churches, local charities and schools. Dorothy Caldwell, Ida Kinney, Dessa Robinson, Dorothy Bradford and Rosa Broadous--ages 71 to 89--were named "queen mothers" by the San Fernando Valley chapter of the National Council of Negro Women during the group's fifth annual Black History Celebration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1995 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a recent visit to Dakar, Senegal, Barbara Perkins played the role of the consummate ambassador. There she was at the third African-African American Summit, mingling with dignitaries, wrestling with tough social and political issues--and putting the San Fernando Valley on the map. "We're always having to raise the Valley flag," Perkins said from her home here. "A lot of times things are happening in Los Angeles and people just forget about [African Americans in] the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1995 | TIM MAY
The San Fernando Valley branch of the National Council of Negro Women will sponsor a trip for young women to an art exhibition of images of African American men at the UCLA Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center. Registration is free, but reservations are required. The trip, which is limited to young women ages 14 through 19, will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Transportation, lunch and an exhibition catalogue will be provided.
FOOD
July 15, 1993 | ANNE MENDELSON
I have one completely unscientific test for all cookbooks claiming to represent a people's inheritance. They should convey the following feeling: "This writer's hands have cooking in them." The reader should sense the writer's brain-to-fingertip-trained instincts going back to parents and grandparents and families of hard-to-please food lovers. When it comes to the realm of current African-American cookbooks, this test is especially useful in telling the genuine from the phony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2010 | By Jocelyn Y. Stewart
Dorothy Height, who was called the queen mother of the civil rights movement through seven decades of advocacy for racial equality -- including 41 years as president of the National Council of Negro Women -- has died. She was 98. Height, who also played a key role in integrating the YWCA, died Tuesday of natural causes at Howard University Hospital in Washington, D.C., the council announced. Though not nearly as well known as her male contemporaries, Height was a steadfast presence in the civil rights movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2010 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart
Dorothy Height, who was called the queen mother of the civil rights movement through seven decades of advocacy for racial equality — including 41 years as president of the National Council of Negro Women — has died. She was 98. Height, who also played a key role in integrating the YWCA, died Tuesday of natural causes at Howard University Hospital in Washington, D.C., the council announced. Though not nearly as well known as her male contemporaries, Height was a steadfast presence in the civil rights movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART
The National Council of Negro Women Inc., a nationally known leadership and service organization for black women, has opened a branch in the San Fernando Valley. The goal of the new chapter will be "to help promote and strengthen the traditional family structure and enhance education" in the African-American community, said Barbara Perkins, newly elected president of the Valley branch.
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