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NEWS
December 19, 2006 | Martin Kaplan, MARTIN KAPLAN is associate dean of the USC Annenberg School, where he directs the Norman Lear Center (learcenter.org).
EVERYONE SAYS WE need a national debate on Iraq. Left, right, politicos, pundits, editorial writers, academics. If ever there was a universally held position, it's the belief that holding a national debate on Iraq is just the thing for what ails us in the Middle East. Rep. Walter Jones (R-N.C.), who coined the term "freedom fries," has called for it. So has Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.), repeatedly. Conservative columnist William Rusher believes "the stage is set for a national debate."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Long before "lean in" became a rallying cry for professional women of America, there was "Murphy Brown. " In fall 1988, the sitcom about a brash, unmarried, fortysomething news anchor and recovering alcoholic premiered on CBS. Though it was slow to build into a hit, "Murphy Brown" became a top 5 show, won 18 Emmys over 10 seasons and sparked a contentious national dialogue about single motherhood, thanks to a certain vice president. Played by patrician blond Candice Bergen, Brown may have been physically reminiscent of real-life newswoman Diane Sawyer, but with her irascible and relentless disposition, she was, as creator Diane English famously put it, closer to "Mike Wallace in a dress.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Dozens of supporters and a handful of protesters greeted patrons arriving today for the opening of an exhibit of Robert Mapplethorpe photographs that incensed Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) and got a museum director arrested in Cincinnati. The crowd of about 150 people, largely made up of those supporting the show, was orderly, and no incidents were reported.
OPINION
November 20, 2012 | By John M. Ackerman
President Obama increased his appeal among Latino voters from 67% to 71% in four years despite the fact that he reneged on his central 2008 campaign promise to "fix our broken immigration system. " This overwhelming support may actually undermine the cause of immigration reform, because it tells the Democrats that the Latino vote is solidly on their side regardless of specific policy stances. This has the dangerous consequence of handing the issue over to the Republicans and their exclusionary, divide-and-conquer approach.
OPINION
November 18, 1990 | Robert Dallek, Robert Dallek is a professor of history at UCLA. His newest book is "When Politics Was King: Lyndon Johnson and His Times, 1908-1960," first of two volumes, to be published next year by Oxford University Press
Not since the Vietnam War has a U.S. President ordered so many American soldiers overseas. And President Bush and his secretary of state, James A. Baker III, have repeatedly warned that unless Saddam Hussein voluntarily withdraws his troops and tanks from Kuwait, the United States may have to use military force to dislodge them. Distracted by arduous budget negotiations and midterm elections, Congress and the public followed the Administration's lead in the Persian Gulf with little protest.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Modern racial strife, as plain as black and white, has taken disruptive root here in the proud cradle of the Renaissance. Many of Florence's 10,000 Third World immigrants and their Italian supporters demonstrated this week to protest a controversial police crackdown that has rousted African street vendors from the city center.
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey
Democrat Kathy Hochul has won a special congressional election in a conservative pocket of western New York, a race dominated by the national debate over House Republicans’ proposal to overhaul Medicare, the Associated Press reported Tuesday. Hochul, the Erie County Clerk, beat Republican state Assemblywoman Jane Corwin and Jack Davis, a wealthy businessman who ran on the “Tea Party” ticket. Early returns showed Hochul with a solid lead over Corwin, with Davis trailing far behind.
NEWS
April 3, 1996 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN and ERIC MALNIC and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal authorities Tuesday began investigating possible criminal charges against two Riverside County sheriff's deputies captured on videotape clubbing two suspected illegal immigrants--while a national debate erupted about whom to blame more, the baton-wielding officers or the fleeing Mexicans. The 15-second beating touched off a sort of national soul-searching.
NEWS
June 12, 2005 | Scott Sonner, Associated Press Writer
They are revered as majestic, galloping icons of the American West -- or reviled as starving, disfigured varmints that rob ranchers of their livelihood. Wild horses and burros are again stirring emotional debate from Western rangelands to the halls of Congress after 41 horses were slaughtered legally in April for the first time since the federal government outlawed the practice in 1971. The ban was repealed in December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Summers for eighth-grader Jade Larriva-Latt are filled with soccer and backpacking, art galleries and museums, library volunteer work and sleep-away camp. There is no summer school, no tutoring. "They need their childhood," says Jade's father, Cesar Larriva, an associate professor of education at Cal Poly Pomona. "It's a huge concern of mine, the lack of balance from pushing them too hard. " For 10th-grader Derek Lee, summer is the time to sprint ahead in the ferocious race to the academic top. He polishes off geometry, algebra and calculus ahead of schedule and masters SAT content (he earned a perfect 800 on the math portion last fall)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Television Critic
If President Obama seemed as if he'd rather be getting his teeth drilled than debate Mitt Romney last week, Vice President Joe Biden spent most of his 90-minute televised showdown with Paul D. Ryan on Thursday night looking like he was having the time of his life. Certainly the format - the two men next to each other at a table facing moderator Martha Raddatz and the audience - played to Biden's experience and jocular ease. Whereas Ryan sat schoolboy straight or hunched tensely in concentration, Biden leaned back, turned this way and that, and played directly to the cameras.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The addition of Rep. Paul D. Ryan to the GOP presidential ticket has upended the congressional campaigns as the battle for the House and Senate swiftly focused on one main issue: Medicare. As the architect of the GOP's Medicare overhaul hit the campaign trail alongside presumed presidential nominee Mitt Romney, the complicated policy issue was catapulted into the national spotlight. Suddenly, Americans began hearing Ryan's vision to change the healthcare safety net for the next generation of seniors at a volume that had not been reached before - despite multiple House and Senate votes on the budget proposal.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak and Maeve Reston
Picking up where their last debate left off, Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich resumed battling Thursday night over personal integrity and the tenor of their respective campaigns, each accusing the other of unfair character attacks. Romney, clearly itching for a fight, turned an early discussion on immigration policy into an assault on Gingrich over a radio spot he ran earlier this week on Florida's Spanish-language airwaves. Gingrich pulled the ad, which described Romney as "anti-immigrant," after it was criticized by Republican Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, a rising national star in Latino politics who is staying neutral in the primary.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Michael Muskal
Gary Johnson is an avid triathlete, so he is no stranger to running far and hard. But that hasn't helped the libertarian former governor of New Mexico break out of the pack in his run for the GOP presidential nomination. Johnson, 58, gets a chance to bask on the national stage Thursday night when he joins with other Republican aspirants in the Fox News/ Google debate. It will be Johnson's first shot at the kind of national publicity that helps fuel a candidate's dreams, but ironically, it will also pit him against Texas Rep. Ron Paul, who helped define the modern libertarian.
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey
Democrat Kathy Hochul has won a special congressional election in a conservative pocket of western New York, a race dominated by the national debate over House Republicans’ proposal to overhaul Medicare, the Associated Press reported Tuesday. Hochul, the Erie County Clerk, beat Republican state Assemblywoman Jane Corwin and Jack Davis, a wealthy businessman who ran on the “Tea Party” ticket. Early returns showed Hochul with a solid lead over Corwin, with Davis trailing far behind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Summers for eighth-grader Jade Larriva-Latt are filled with soccer and backpacking, art galleries and museums, library volunteer work and sleep-away camp. There is no summer school, no tutoring. "They need their childhood," says Jade's father, Cesar Larriva, an associate professor of education at Cal Poly Pomona. "It's a huge concern of mine, the lack of balance from pushing them too hard. " For 10th-grader Derek Lee, summer is the time to sprint ahead in the ferocious race to the academic top. He polishes off geometry, algebra and calculus ahead of schedule and masters SAT content (he earned a perfect 800 on the math portion last fall)
NEWS
August 2, 1997 | Reuters
Japan has hanged four people, including a prison author whose sentence for murders he committed as a 19-year-old sparked a national debate on capital punishment, media reported today. Norio Nagayama, 48, who was convicted of killing four people in a 1968 shooting rampage, became a best-selling author while in prison. He and convicted murderer Hideki Kanda, 54, were hanged in Tokyo, news reports said.
MAGAZINE
June 25, 1989
We should have a national debate on the pros and cons of legalizing drugs. If, after reviewing the choices, the people begin to react favorably to legalization, the politicians will be able to respond. Decriminalization does not condone drug use but, instead, recognizes the great peril that drugs are to all of society, especially to the youth of this nation. It will eliminate profit and reduce drug demand by providing money for prevention and treatment. ELIZABETH OLSON Gardena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2011 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
An effort by a handful of UC Berkeley scientists to reexamine temperature data underlying global warming research has landed in the center of a national political debate over government regulation. The Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature study is led by physicist Richard Muller, a longtime critic of the scientific consensus on climate change, who plans to testify on the effort Thursday before the House Science Committee in the latest of several congressional inquiries on climate science since the GOP majority was seated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Given what appears to be a tightly competitive year in college admissions, Katie Frake of Long Beach hedged her bets by applying to 11 schools. "I figured it would be the safest thing, the best thing. So I applied to a bunch because I wanted to be sure I would get into someplace I like," said the 17- year-old Wilson High School senior, whose application list includes UCLA, Stanford, Santa Clara University and the University of Chicago. Frake is far from alone with those concerns as she and other students hover around their mailboxes and computers this month to await admission decisions.
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