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WORLD
October 17, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
These are excerpts from the first day of a two-day U.N. Security Council debate on Iraq. Council members, including the United States, will speak last. U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan (in a statement read by Deputy Secretary-General Louise Frechette) "Iraq has to comply. It must implement the disarmament program required by our resolutions.... The inspectors must have unfettered access. The council will expect nothing less.
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OPINION
September 8, 2002 | JAMES P. PINKERTON
The special session of Congress held in Manhattan on Friday has been slapped around in the press. It's a frivolous exercise in showboating and speechmaking, some say. But, in fact, it took a modicum of courage for members of Congress to go there. In the era of suitcase nukes and mailable anthrax, it perhaps takes guts for Congress to assemble anywhere. Of course, everyone in Manhattan--or Washington, D.C., or any other possible terrorist target--must now live with heightened risk.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kim Su Hwan imagines catching the biggest fish alive. Choi In Woon wants to perfect his badminton game. Kim So Hyon would just sleep a lot. The three wage warriors and millions of fellow countrymen are busy spending future leisure time in their heads, as South Korea considers moving from a six-day workweek to the five-day version that is standard in the U.S., Japan and Western Europe. Korea also hopes to accomplish the shift in apparent defiance of conventional economic logic.
NEWS
November 8, 2001 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Institutes of Health on Wednesday said they had begun accepting applications from scientists who want federal money to study human embryonic stem cells, a controversial type of research that prompted an intense national debate last summer. The announcement had been eagerly awaited among scientists who hope stem cells will lead to new cures for disease and a better understanding of embryo development.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2001
This week marks a grim anniversary--it was two years ago Wednesday that five young people died when their car plunged off the Angeles Crest Highway as they drove home from a rave in the San Gabriel Mountains. The tragedy intensified the spotlight on the rave scene and its dangers, but, really, that spotlight has rarely dimmed much in recent years as defenders of the growing scene fend off accusations that it's more about drug use than music.
NEWS
May 27, 2001 | RONALD D. WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Duncan, who survived severe burns and a 60-foot fall in an oil refinery accident, is the kind of victim the workers' compensation program was designed to help. But he's also part of an ongoing debate about workers' compensation and its costs and effectiveness in California and across the nation. On one side are employers and insurers who say that injuries are increasingly rare because workplaces are safer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2001 | MIKE CONKLIN, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
On a Saturday night last December, Museum of Science & Industry employees here looked on in amazement as some 25 people gathered outside the building to demonstrate against, of all things, the institution's seemingly innocuous new agricultural exhibit, "The Farm." The highly vocal protesters were a loose coalition of family farm supporters and animal rights activists opposing what they claim is a distorted, Pollyannaish view of modern agribusiness portrayed by the exhibit.
OPINION
October 8, 2000 | Ted Halstead and Michael Lind, Ted Halstead is president of the New America Foundation, where Michael Lind is a senior fellow. They are co-authors of the forthcoming book "The Radical Center."
The debate over how to improve America's system of K-12 education is raging at all levels this electoral season. At the national level, Texas Gov. George W. Bush proposes a limited school-voucher plan, which Vice President Al Gore rejects in favor of more money for conventional public schools.
NEWS
September 10, 2000 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Army came here Saturday to kill its own. Pitting unit against unit, war games raged across 200,000 acres of Louisiana bottom land constructed to mimic the real world. There were villages with homes, restaurants, graveyards. Mortar rounds exploded overheard. Even a riotous population demonstrated against the invaders. But unlike war games of old, when U.S.
OPINION
September 10, 2000 | Amy Wilentz, Amy Wilentz, who lived in Jerusalem for four years, has written about the Middle East for the New Yorker. She is writing a book about Jerusalem
Ehud Barak is a military man with many hobbies. He is a piano player, a watchmaker and a lock picker. Legend has it he can open anything. This doesn't mean he holds the keys to peace, however. As international leaders met for the U.N. get-together in New York last week, it looked increasingly unlikely that President Bill Clinton's elevator diplomacy would bring the Israelis and Palestinians, both on different floors of the Waldorf-Astoria, to an agreement.
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