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National Education Assn

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NEWS
June 28, 1987 | CHRISTOPER CONNELL, Associated Press
Mary Hatwood Futrell remembers walking to a segregated black school in Lynchburg, Va., as a skinny child taunted by other youngsters about the raggedy clothes she wore. "Kids can be really cruel," Futrell says. "They called me 'Seemo' for 'See mo' holes than you do clothes. I didn't have a lot of clothes. I had a lot of holes." The only taunts Futrell hears these days are aimed not at her wardrobe but at the National Education Assn., the giant teachers' union she heads.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2013 | By Howard Blume
A conservative organization has joined with a group of California teachers in an effort to overturn laws that allow teacher unions to collect fees from those who don't want to be members. The lawsuit , filed Tuesday in federal court in Santa Ana, targets "agency-shop" rules that apply in about half the states in the country. Under the law, unions can collect from teachers a base fee for services they provide, whether the teachers choose to join the union or not. The law also includes a process by which a union reduces the fees to exclude the cost of political activities from those such as negotiating for wages and benefits.
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NEWS
May 14, 1985
Mary H. Futrell, president of the 1.7-million-member National Education Assn., said that she will push the country's largest teachers union to make a clear statement in support of nationwide tests for new teachers when it holds its annual convention in Washington this summer. Futrell asserted in a Washington Post interview that the union will gain more input later on if it supports a nationwide professional exam now.
OPINION
May 23, 2012
Re "An imperfect union," Opinion, May 18 Troy Senik says that the California Teachers Assn. is the state's most powerful union. How does he define powerful? With pay? At an average salary of $68,000, teachers are not the best-paid public employees. Plus, starting salaries for beginning teachers average about $35,000. And our pensions? Remember, teachers kick in about 8% of each paycheck to the State Teachers Retirement System; their employers contribute another 8%. What public employees do that?
NEWS
December 5, 1992
Lawrence G. Derthick Sr., 85, former U.S. commissioner of education. Derthick, appointed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, headed the U.S. Office of Education from 1956 until 1961. He had served as superintendent of schools in Nashville and Chattanooga and as president of the American Assn. of School Administrators. After leaving government service, he became associate executive secretary of the National Education Assn. On Thursday in Chattanooga.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Call Issued for More, Better Children's Programming: A national coalition of more than 80 groups--including the National Education Assn., the U.S. Catholic Conference and the American Academy of Pediatrics--sent a letter urging the Federal Communications Commission to strengthen the guidelines for children's television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1987
Kudos to Marc Tucker for his article "The Teaching of Teachers: Tough Lessons" (Opinion, Oct. 25). Hopefully, the college presidents will ask for representatives of several outstanding teachers from both secondary and elementary schools for their input. These master teachers who are working can provide greater insights for the college committees. Thus, this will truly be a partnership of educators. 'Tis time "the sheepskin curtain" came down! Perhaps this committee will also, at a later date, be able to work with a partnership of representatives from the National Education Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Education Secretary Rod Paige on Saturday urged the nation's largest teachers union to support President Bush's education reform bill, saying that teachers will ultimately determine whether the program succeeds. Paige's speech at a conference of the National Education Assn. steered clear of many controversial issues and served mainly as a goodwill gesture to a union often criticized by Republicans as being an impediment to reforms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1985
Let me express my appreciation on behalf of the 1.7-million-member National Education Assn. for the excellent editorials (Sept. 3), "Thanks, Teach," and (Sept. 9), "Dealing With a Staggering Loss". The editorial on teaching is particularly uplifting as it recognizes the real frustrations of teaching--being undervalued and unappreciated--while making positive suggestions to elevate the profession to the heights it richly deserves. Your comment that improving teachers and teaching will require leadership from teachers themselves--as well as from local, state and national governments--is well taken.
NEWS
July 3, 1987 | From the Associated Press
The president of the nation's largest teachers union said Thursday that teachers are "going to war" to replace the Reagan Administration with "the first education President." Mary Hatwood Futrell, in a punchy keynote address to nearly 8,000 teachers at the start of the National Education Assn.'s 125th annual convention in Los Angeles, vowed that the 1.86-million-member union would build the biggest political action committee of the 1988 campaign.
OPINION
August 20, 2010
Teachers and their data Re "Teachers, by the numbers," Editorial, Aug. 17 I am a parent and strongly disagree with The Times releasing teacher test score data to the public. This will create a negative impact on schools. Parents already lobby for their favorite teachers, even without these data. Releasing this information will make it difficult for principals to run their schools. The data should be used as a tool to help principals evaluate and improve their teaching staff.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2009 | Associated Press
End war, forever. Make the planet greener. Please help my dad find work. Make it rain candy! Thousands of kids detailed their hopes and expectations for President Obama in letters and drawings as part of a "Dear Mr. President" project, with 150 chosen for publication in a free e-book being released today, on Presidents Day. Most had tall orders for the new guy in the White House. Anthony Pape, 10, of DuBois, Pa., offered: "I hope that we will have no war ever again.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2007 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
The National Education Assn. faces a federal lawsuit accusing it of breaching its duty to members by recommending a high-cost retirement plan in exchange for millions of dollars from the managers of the plan. The suit, which seeks class-action status, was filed by two of the 57,000 schoolteachers who the suit says invested $1 billion in a so-called 403(b) retirement plan endorsed by the NEA.
OPINION
October 25, 2004
Many schools have barely gotten the Coke machines off campus when along comes a nationwide nutrition-education program for schoolchildren funded by the corporate purveyors of a controversial diet. Atkins Nutritionals Inc. has made agreements with various school-related groups, including the National Assn. of State Boards of Education and the National Education Assn., to combat childhood obesity.
OPINION
October 2, 2004
Re "Drawing Attention to Schools," Sept. 26: I am a teacher who retired last June, early at age 63. The No Child Left Behind Act simply did me in. I could no longer teach writing by formula, leaving the truly creative writer at a disadvantage. I could no longer teach so many math concepts for the next test that my students did not have time to internalize them. And I just could not accept teaching to the test and spending a week with practice tests to get ready for the real test. What happened to fun and creativity in the classroom?
OPINION
February 26, 2004
Re "Paige Calls Teachers Union a 'Terrorist Organization,' " Feb. 24: In my classroom during a discussion or debate, no matter how controversial, students are required to use only well-defended facts; name-calling is never acceptable. My students understand that name-calling is a sign of a weak argument, never a valid defense. I am also dismayed that Education Secretary Rod Paige seems unaware that union leaders are elected democratically by teachers and do, in fact, represent us. One can question aspects of No Child Left Behind without being "against real, rock-solid improvements in the way we educate our children," as Paige charged in his apology.
OPINION
October 25, 2004
Many schools have barely gotten the Coke machines off campus when along comes a nationwide nutrition-education program for schoolchildren funded by the corporate purveyors of a controversial diet. Atkins Nutritionals Inc. has made agreements with various school-related groups, including the National Assn. of State Boards of Education and the National Education Assn., to combat childhood obesity.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | From Associated Press
School shootings have prompted the nation's largest teachers' union to offer a special $150,000 benefit for teachers and other school employees slain at work. While the National Education Assn. has offered life insurance to members since the 1980s, the new "unlawful homicide" benefit was only approved this year. It will be announced to the union's 2.6 million members in a September newsletter. The payout for accidental death while on the job is $50,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Education Secretary Rod Paige on Saturday urged the nation's largest teachers union to support President Bush's education reform bill, saying that teachers will ultimately determine whether the program succeeds. Paige's speech at a conference of the National Education Assn. steered clear of many controversial issues and served mainly as a goodwill gesture to a union often criticized by Republicans as being an impediment to reforms.
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