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National Endowment For The Arts

NEWS
October 6, 1990 | Associated Press
A traveling exhibit of Robert Mapplethorpe's photographs closed Friday, leaving in its wake protests and a conservative attack on the National Endowment for the Arts. The exhibit combined Mapplethorpe's explicit homoerotic photographs--the main source of the controversy--with cool, elegant portraits and photographs of flowers. Mapplethorpe helped organize the show shortly before he died of AIDS in 1989. Boston was the last stop on the exhibit's seven-city tour.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2007 | Mike Boehm
The National Endowment for the Arts will get a 16% budget increase in 2008, to $144.7 million, under an appropriation bill signed this week by President Bush. The funding boost continues a gradual upward trend for the agency during the Bush administration, recouping precipitous losses under President Clinton.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A district court judge in New York dismissed a lawsuit against the National Endowment for the Arts on Wednesday after the agency agreed to delete a controversial anti-obscenity requirement of groups seeking federal arts funds. The case was brought last May by New York's New School for Social Research, the institutional parent of Otis/Parsons Art Institute in Los Angeles, which asserted that requiring artists to pledge in advance not to create or show obscene art is unconstitutional.
NEWS
July 12, 1997 | KASPER ZEUTHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Friday rejected a Republican bid to kill the National Endowment for the Arts and replace it with state grants, and then delayed action on a bill that would dramatically reduce the agency's budget. The plan to abolish the agency and send $80 million to the states for arts projects was voted down 271 to 155. The proposal, sponsored by Rep. Vernon J. Ehlers (R-Mich.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York theater producer Joseph Papp turned down a $50,000 National Endowment for the Arts grant Thursday and said he would reject another $400,000 he expected to receive as a protest over anti-obscenity provisions imposed on the arts agency by conservatives in Congress. Papp's decision was disclosed in a letter he sent from his New York Shakespeare Festival to NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1990 | From United Press International
A parody about Sen. Jesse Helms' efforts to restrict the National Endowment for the Arts is about to hit the radio airwaves. The Charlotte Observer reported Tuesday that Helms (R-N.C.) is featured in the offbeat lyrics of songwriter Loudon Wainwright III, whose recording "Jesse Don't Like It" is scheduled for release July 23.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1992 | From Reuters
Author Wallace Stegner has turned down a White House medal to protest alleged censorship at the National Endowment for the Arts, he and U.S. officials said. Stegner, 84, became the second prominent American artist to turn down a National Medal of Arts since the acting head of the National Endowment for the Arts announced that she would police the agency's grant awards to artists to assure that their projects were suitable for "the widest possible audiences."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Linda Sohl-Donnell sees her life and work as part of a larger effort to keep tap-dance alive in America. For her efforts, the artistic director of the local dance troupe Rhapsody in Taps recently was awarded a $9,100 grant by the National Endowment for the Arts. Though Sohl-Donnell had been tap-dancing since she was a child, her interest was rekindled when, as a student at UCLA, she attended a tap performance. "I saw a kind of tap-dancing I had never seen before," she said.
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | Associated Press
Lawmakers from Western states abandoned Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) in droves Thursday, accepting a "corn for porn" deal that preserves grazing subsidies in exchange for keeping new anti-obscenity restrictions off federal arts grants. On a 73-25 vote, the Senate reversed its support for Helms' measure to impose prohibitions on subsidizing "patently offensive" sexual exhibits or performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1990 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top official at South Coast Repertory theater said Monday that he has assured the mayor of Costa Mesa that no city funds were used to pay for a leaflet that urged playgoers to voice support for the National Endowment for the Arts and that he is confident the company will receive a city grant that has been held up over the issue. "I have been able to give (Mayor Peter F.
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