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WORLD
September 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A government-run human rights commission accused soldiers of rape and torture, and recommended that the army be removed from Mexico's nationwide drug war. Military officials declined to comment on the report by the National Human Rights Commission. President Felipe Calderon's office said it was reviewing the report.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 27, 2010
The bullet-riddled bodies of 72 Central and South Americans reportedly slain by drug traffickers in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas shine a light on the dark truth known to undocumented migrants: The illegal trek north through Mexico is treacherous, and those who undertake it put themselves at the mercy of vicious predators. Even before they reach the potentially fatal desert crossing into the United States, thousands of migrants each year face kidnapping, extortion, sexual assault and murder — crimes that often go unreported and unsolved.
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WORLD
November 14, 2002 | From Associated Press
The commander of Indonesia's elite commando force will be charged with gross human rights violations for his alleged involvement in the massacre of 33 protesters in 1984, the nation's attorney general said Wednesday. Thousands of Muslim youths were fired on by soldiers while demonstrating peacefully in northern Jakarta, the capital, against the arrest of several anti-government protesters. Atty. Gen. Mohammed Abdul Rahman said Maj. Gen.
WORLD
June 16, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Mexico's human rights ombudsman Wednesday blamed the army for the April shooting deaths of two children that stoked a raging debate over the military's role as a domestic police force. Raul Plascencia, president of the National Human Rights Commission, rejected the military's assertion that the van in which the two boys were riding near the U.S. border was caught in a cross-fire between soldiers and gunmen. Plascencia said the wounds resulted from "direct and discretionary" fire by Mexican troops.
NEWS
January 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
A government human rights commission has found that two Huichol Indians charged with killing a U.S. journalist were illegally detained and possibly tortured by soldiers. Under Mexican law, soldiers are not allowed to arrest civilians in criminal cases.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two former state police officers and two other alleged gunmen have been arrested for the murder of a prominent human rights activist whose death brought Mexico international condemnation, Sinaloa state officials announced Monday. The suspects gunned down Norma Corona Sapien, a lawyer and president of the independent Human Right Commission of Sinaloa, in downtown Culiacan on May 21, officials said. But they conceded that the so-called intellectual authors of the crime have not been found.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overcrowding, deteriorating facilities and poorly trained guards make Mexican prisons ripe for violence, according to a report released Tuesday by the Americas Watch human rights organization. Prisoners already have been killed in riots at three prisons, including La Mesa in Tijuana, in the past three years. "Many other prisons are powder kegs ready to explode," the report warned.
OPINION
February 27, 2004
The numbers coming from the city of Juarez, across the border from El Paso, are staggering: Number of women killed since 1993 -- 370. Number of those victims raped -- about 100. Number of additional women missing -- 70, according to local authorities; 400, according to nongovernmental organizations. Number of victims not identified -- 75. Number of murders to result in conviction -- one.
OPINION
August 27, 2010
The bullet-riddled bodies of 72 Central and South Americans reportedly slain by drug traffickers in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas shine a light on the dark truth known to undocumented migrants: The illegal trek north through Mexico is treacherous, and those who undertake it put themselves at the mercy of vicious predators. Even before they reach the potentially fatal desert crossing into the United States, thousands of migrants each year face kidnapping, extortion, sexual assault and murder — crimes that often go unreported and unsolved.
WORLD
September 22, 2009 | Ken Ellingwood
President Felipe Calderon's pick for attorney general faced questioning in Congress on Monday amid criticism by human rights groups that he failed as a state prosecutor to solve the killings of hundreds of women in Ciudad Juarez in the 1990s. Calderon has named Arturo Chavez Chavez to be the nation's top law enforcement officer at a moment when the government is locked in a bloody war against drug-trafficking cartels and the public's confidence in the justice system is low. Chavez, 49, who belongs to Calderon's conservative National Action Party, or PAN, would take over for Eduardo Medina Mora, who resigned this month as part of a Cabinet shake-up.
WORLD
February 26, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood
The manhunt was over. Raydel "Crutches" Lopez Uriarte, the alleged top enforcer for a vicious Tijuana drug gang that dissolved victims in lye, would now have to face justice. First, though, he would have to face the press. A day after his arrest, Lopez found himself standing woodenly with his hands cuffed behind him as news photographers snapped away at him and three others arrested in the same raid. The 30-year-old Lopez, one of the most dreaded figures on the border, had a trim goatee and combed hair, and wore a sensible checkered shirt and dark jeans that looked like they were meant for someone half a head taller.
WORLD
September 22, 2009 | Ken Ellingwood
President Felipe Calderon's pick for attorney general faced questioning in Congress on Monday amid criticism by human rights groups that he failed as a state prosecutor to solve the killings of hundreds of women in Ciudad Juarez in the 1990s. Calderon has named Arturo Chavez Chavez to be the nation's top law enforcement officer at a moment when the government is locked in a bloody war against drug-trafficking cartels and the public's confidence in the justice system is low. Chavez, 49, who belongs to Calderon's conservative National Action Party, or PAN, would take over for Eduardo Medina Mora, who resigned this month as part of a Cabinet shake-up.
OPINION
April 22, 2008 | Zachary Bookman, Zachary Bookman is a lawyer and a Fulbright Fellow studying transparency in Mexico City.
This is not your parents' Mexico. Dogs are fatter, cars are bigger and the typical Mexican knows a little more about the workings of her government. This is nothing to scoff at. For most of the 20th century, Mexico was ruled by a single, secretive political party. Human rights abuses went undocumented, and journalism was practically a state-sponsored profession.
WORLD
September 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A government-run human rights commission accused soldiers of rape and torture, and recommended that the army be removed from Mexico's nationwide drug war. Military officials declined to comment on the report by the National Human Rights Commission. President Felipe Calderon's office said it was reviewing the report.
OPINION
February 27, 2004
The numbers coming from the city of Juarez, across the border from El Paso, are staggering: Number of women killed since 1993 -- 370. Number of those victims raped -- about 100. Number of additional women missing -- 70, according to local authorities; 400, according to nongovernmental organizations. Number of victims not identified -- 75. Number of murders to result in conviction -- one.
WORLD
November 14, 2002 | From Associated Press
The commander of Indonesia's elite commando force will be charged with gross human rights violations for his alleged involvement in the massacre of 33 protesters in 1984, the nation's attorney general said Wednesday. Thousands of Muslim youths were fired on by soldiers while demonstrating peacefully in northern Jakarta, the capital, against the arrest of several anti-government protesters. Atty. Gen. Mohammed Abdul Rahman said Maj. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2001
Here's a sign of the times that is at once sobering and comforting: At a moment when the U.S. government is pulling down the shades on its inner workings--arguing, for instance, that the public should be shut out if terrorism suspects are put on trial--our once secretive southern neighbor is boldly shedding light on its actions.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The discovery of telephone bugging devices at the National Human Rights Commission here has set off a flurry of criticism reaching from the Mexican Congress to the offices of Americas Watch in Washington. Two microphones and a transmitter were discovered at commission offices last month. The commission announced the discovery Tuesday, while Chairman Jorge Carpizo was in Washington meeting with U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2001
Here's a sign of the times that is at once sobering and comforting: At a moment when the U.S. government is pulling down the shades on its inner workings--arguing, for instance, that the public should be shut out if terrorism suspects are put on trial--our once secretive southern neighbor is boldly shedding light on its actions.
NEWS
November 28, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fulfilling a key campaign pledge, Mexican President Vicente Fox said Tuesday that his government will prosecute and punish officials who are found responsible for killing hundreds of leftists in the 1970s and '80s. Speaking in the courtyard of a former jail once filled with political prisoners, Fox also said that security files from that era will be opened, allowing public scrutiny for the first time of human rights abuses during the government's "dirty war" against leftist insurgents.
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