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May 12, 2004 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
A blue-ribbon panel that examined conflict of interest at the National Institutes of Health found permissive practices that were not detailed in its final report last week, internal agency documents show. The documents also show that top aides to NIH Director Elias A. Zerhouni were allowed to review and comment privately on the panel's draft findings. Congressional investigators have expressed interest in the circumstances surrounding compilation of the report, issued Thursday.
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NATIONAL
March 13, 2004 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
The National Institutes of Health should prohibit its top officials from accepting many consulting payments from drug companies, and require public disclosure of any payments made to such officials, former NIH Director Harold E. Varmus said on Friday. Appearing before the NIH's blue-ribbon panel on conflict of interest, Varmus also said the agency should discourage its scientists from accepting large amounts of money from companies or spending too much time on nongovernment work.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2004 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
Federal ethics lawyers announced Monday that scores of high-level scientists at the National Institutes of Health will now be required to publicly disclose any income from drug companies or other outside employers. Lawyers from the U.S. Office of Government Ethics said that all deputy directors, scientific directors and clinical-research directors at the NIH would now have to state their outside income and other assets on a yearly basis.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2004 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
Two leading Democrats in the House of Representatives called on 10 major drug companies Thursday to reveal how much they had paid in consulting fees and stock options to scientists at the National Institutes of Health. The request comes as congressional investigators have been frustrated in their recent attempts to pry the information from NIH officials. Rep. Henry A. Waxman of Los Angeles, the senior Democrat on the Government Reform Committee, and Rep.
NATIONAL
January 23, 2004 | David Willman and Jon Marino, Times Staff Writers
Top-level officials at the National Institutes of Health -- amid sharp criticism from congressional leaders -- have stopped accepting consulting fees and stock options from drug companies, the agency's leader told a Senate hearing on Thursday. "As of this moment, no director has any outside biotechnology or pharmaceutical relationship," said the leader of the NIH, Dr. Elias A. Zerhouni, referring to the directors of the agency's research institutes and centers. "Those have been stopped." Sen.
NATIONAL
January 17, 2004 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
Three leading House Democrats on Friday asked the General Accounting Office to investigate consulting fees and stock options paid by drug companies to employees at the National Institutes of Health. Citing details from a Los Angeles Times article published last month, the House members called for an "investigation into potential conflicts of interest" at the federal government's center for medical research on humans.
NATIONAL
December 29, 2003 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
The director of the National Institutes of Health, moving to shore up confidence in the agency, may seek to expand public disclosure of paid consulting arrangements between drug-development companies and his federal employees. Citing "concerns" raised about the consulting payments, the director of the agency, Dr. Elias A. Zerhouni, said in a letter to the chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee that he was taking corrective actions. "I have ordered a review of financial disclosure requirements for NIH personnel, and after this review, I will act to increase appropriate financial disclosure," Zerhouni wrote in his letter to the committee chairman, Rep. W.J. "Billy" Tauzin (R-La.
NATIONAL
December 9, 2003 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
Two congressional leaders on Monday called upon the director of the National Institutes of Health to account for all payments that drug companies have made to researchers at the federal agency over the past four years. The leaders -- Reps. W.J. "Billy" Tauzin (R-La.) and James C. Greenwood (R-Pa.) -- said that their letter was in response to articles in Sunday editions of the Los Angeles Times detailing millions of dollars in consulting fees and stock options paid by companies to NIH employees.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2003 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
"Subject No. 4" died at 1:44 a.m. on June 14, 1999, in the immense federal research clinic of the National Institutes of Health. The cause of death was clear: a complication from an experimental treatment for kidney inflammation using a drug made by a German company, Schering AG. Among the first to be notified was Dr. Stephen I. Katz, the senior NIH official whose institute conducted the study. Unbeknown to the participants, Katz also was a paid consultant to Schering AG.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2003 | Aaron Zitner, Times Staff Writer
An apparent misunderstanding with Congress prompted the National Institutes of Health to put more than 150 researchers on notice in recent weeks that lawmakers were taking a skeptical look at their studies on AIDS, sexuality and high-risk behaviors. The calls to researchers, in turn, provoked accusations Monday from Rep. Henry A.
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