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National Institutes Of Health

NATIONAL
December 14, 2005 | Jonathan D. Rockoff, Baltimore Sun
In a bold but uncertain bid to spur cancer treatment, federal medical researchers announced a $100-million project Tuesday to begin cataloging the disease's molecular underpinnings. The Cancer Genome Atlas, as the project is called, will start as a three-year pilot program to identify the genes behind two or three types of cancerous tumors. If the research proves promising and affordable, it would be expanded to study thousands of cancerous tumors.
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NATIONAL
August 26, 2005 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
After six months of review, the National Institutes of Health has decided to leave in place its ban against agency scientists taking consulting fees from drug companies but will not require the scientists to sell all of their industry stock holdings, officials announced Thursday.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2005 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
Ethics officials at the National Institutes of Health often approved senior scientists' requests to moonlight for drug companies and other outside organizations without gathering adequate documentation to help judge whether the arrangements posed conflicts of interest, federal inspectors have found. In 81% of the recent outside arrangements reviewed by the inspector general of the U.S.
NATIONAL
July 14, 2005 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
Results from an ongoing internal review of drug company consulting payments to scientists at the National Institutes of Health show the agency's ethical problems are serious and widespread, a House committee chairman said Wednesday. The review examined whether a sample of 81 NIH scientists had moonlighted for industry without getting required permission from the agency, whether they disclosed company payments on annual forms and whether they performed company services on government time.
NATIONAL
May 20, 2005 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
The director of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, who last month said new ethics restrictions against owning biomedical company stocks would prompt his departure, has decided to stay in his federal post. Dr. James F. Battey Jr. said Thursday that he would continue to lead the deafness institute, a part of the National Institutes of Health.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2005 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
A Duke University physician, whose concerns about some of the new, more stringent conflict-of-interest rules at the National Institutes of Health had delayed his decision to become an agency director, said Tuesday that he would start his federal position next week. Dr. David A. Schwartz said he decided to accept the job as director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences after several recent conversations with the NIH's director, Dr. Elias A. Zerhouni.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt said Tuesday that he was reviewing -- and might soften -- a strict new conflict-of-interest policy that had led to complaints from some scientists at the National Institutes of Health. "There have been concerns raised," Leavitt told reporters during a question-and-answer session in his office. "We are in the process now of analyzing those comments, and then we'll make a judgment."
NATIONAL
April 21, 2005 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health who are fighting new rules that would end their financial ties to the drug industry have hired, at a favorable rate, a law and lobbying firm that also represents the companies. The hiring has added firepower to the government scientists' campaign, which already is getting results: Senior aides to NIH Director Elias A.
SCIENCE
April 20, 2005 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
The death toll from being overweight or obese is far less than a controversial government estimate released last year that body fat killed about 400,000 people annually and was poised to outstrip tobacco as the leading preventable cause of death, according to a new study. The study estimated that obesity killed about 112,000 people, most of whom were extremely obese with body sizes equivalent to a 5-foot-4-inch woman who weighed 204 or more pounds.
SCIENCE
April 14, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
About 4 million adult Americans with a mild form of asthma may not need to take daily steroid doses, but instead can use the drug only as needed to control symptoms, says a new study supported by the National Institutes of Health. The change would make drug use more convenient, minimize side effects from the powerful drugs and possibly save the nation as much as $2 billion per year, the study concludes.
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