Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNational Intelligence Estimate
IN THE NEWS

National Intelligence Estimate

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
July 19, 2007
ANATURAL TEMPTATION -- to which some commentators already have succumbed -- is to view the new National Intelligence Estimate on terror threats exclusively through the prism of the Bush administration's dispute with Congress over Iraq. President Bush, who habitually engages in the strategic conflation of the post-9/11 war on terror with the war in Iraq, sees vindication in the report's conclusion that Al Qaeda will seek to "leverage" its Iraqi affiliate to attack the United States.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
December 6, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The U.S. intelligence community is nearing completion of its first detailed review of cyber-spying against American targets from abroad, including an attempt to calculate U.S. financial losses from hacker attacks based in China, officials said. The National Intelligence Estimate, the first involving cyber-espionage, also will seek to determine how large a role the Chinese government plays in directing or coordinating digital attacks aimed at stealing U.S. intellectual property, according to officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss a classified undertaking.
Advertisement
OPINION
August 11, 2004
Lawrence Korb is mistaken to reject the concept that major intelligence analyses should be subject to a Team B review ("It's Time to Bench 'Team B,' " Commentary, Aug. 8). Had this occurred with regard to the pre-Iraq war analyses, it is likely, based on the 9/11 commission report, that the common belief that Iraq had WMD would have been disputed. What Korb's view means is that a politicized Team B report is worthless and, indeed, harmful. Still, it seems clear that an objective Team B report is essential when the issue before the country, as in Iraq, is war or peace.
OPINION
February 16, 2010 | By Ilan Berman and Robert C. McFarlane
What can the Obama administration do about Iran's drive to develop nuclear weapons? The president's informal year-end deadline for a diplomatic resolution to the nuclear impasse with Iran has come and gone. Iran recently announced that it plans to build 10 nuclear fuel plants and has moved to enrich uranium to a higher level than necessary for peaceful purposes. As a result, the center of gravity within Washington policy circles is moving toward punitive measures against the Islamic Republic in the hope of curtailing its persistent nuclear ambitions.
OPINION
December 22, 2006
Re "Democrats plan new intelligence oversight," Dec. 15 As a former Senate senior staff member and concerned citizen, I applaud the plan to create a new House panel to oversee the operations and budgets of the 16 separate agencies that now compose the nation's intelligence community. Repeated failures by U.S. intelligence in recent years attest to the growing need for effective oversight. The record shows that few, if any, in the intelligence community or Congress have been held accountable for their lapses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1999
Re "Time to Say Farewell to Spy Scandal," Column Left, Sept. 14: Robert Scheer asserted four main "facts"; each of them is false. Five days before his column appeared, the most recent National Intelligence Estimate--the consensus of the entire U.S. intelligence community--stated that the People's Republic of China is expected to test "a longer range mobile ICBM within the next several years; it will be targeted primarily against the United States."...
OPINION
October 1, 2006 | David Wise, David Wise, a Washington-based author, writes frequently about intelligence and secrecy.
LAST WEEK, ONE of Washington's favorite spectator sports -- the secrecy game -- reached new heights of absurdity. Americans were treated to the spectacle of an administration obsessed with secrecy turning around and declassifying parts of one of the most highly secret documents produced by the CIA and other U.S. intelligence agencies.
OPINION
September 26, 2006
Re "Spy Agencies Say Iraq War Fuels Terror," Sept. 24 How could anyone not have known this years ago? Did the Bush administration think that invading an Islamic nation and killing tens of thousands of civilians would somehow mysteriously reduce terrorism? Many Americans are puzzled that there is sectarian violence in Iraq. Shiites and Sunnis have been fighting each other for centuries. What did this administration think would happen when it dissolved the Iraqi army and police? Does anyone in the Bush administration think at all?
NATIONAL
July 10, 2004 | Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writer
In a classified National Intelligence Estimate prepared before the Iraq war, the CIA hedged its judgments about Saddam Hussein and weapons of mass destruction, pointing up the limits of its knowledge. But in the unclassified version of the NIE -- the so-called white paper cited by the Bush administration in making its case for war -- those carefully qualified conclusions were turned into blunt assertions of fact, according to the Senate Intelligence Committee's report on prewar intelligence.
NATIONAL
October 4, 2002 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CIA Director George J. Tenet agreed to brief key lawmakers on Iraq today after members of the Senate Intelligence Committee complained that the agency was refusing to answer important questions about the effects of a potential U.S. invasion. Sen. Bob Graham (D-Fla.), chairman of the committee, accused the CIA on Thursday of "obstructionism" for not producing intelligence reports concerning issues committee members specifically requested last month. Among the issues are what effect a U.S.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2009 | WASHINGTON POST
Charles W. Freeman Jr. withdrew Tuesday from his appointment as chairman of the National Intelligence Council after questions about his impartiality were raised among members of Congress and with White House officials. Director of National Intelligence Dennis C. Blair said he accepted Freeman's decision "with great regret." The withdrawal came hours after Blair gave a spirited defense of the outspoken former ambassador on Capitol Hill.
OPINION
July 19, 2007
ANATURAL TEMPTATION -- to which some commentators already have succumbed -- is to view the new National Intelligence Estimate on terror threats exclusively through the prism of the Bush administration's dispute with Congress over Iraq. President Bush, who habitually engages in the strategic conflation of the post-9/11 war on terror with the war in Iraq, sees vindication in the report's conclusion that Al Qaeda will seek to "leverage" its Iraqi affiliate to attack the United States.
WORLD
February 3, 2007 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Bush administration officials acknowledged Friday that they had yet to compile evidence strong enough to back up publicly their claims that Iran is fomenting violence against U.S. troops in Iraq. Administration officials have long complained that Iran was supplying Shiite Muslim militants with lethal explosives and other materiel used to kill U.S. military personnel.
OPINION
December 22, 2006
Re "Democrats plan new intelligence oversight," Dec. 15 As a former Senate senior staff member and concerned citizen, I applaud the plan to create a new House panel to oversee the operations and budgets of the 16 separate agencies that now compose the nation's intelligence community. Repeated failures by U.S. intelligence in recent years attest to the growing need for effective oversight. The record shows that few, if any, in the intelligence community or Congress have been held accountable for their lapses.
OPINION
November 21, 2006 | Jennifer Glaudemans, JENNIFER GLAUDEMANS is a former CIA analyst and an attorney.
FIFTEEN YEARS AGO, the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence asked me to testify at the confirmation hearings for Robert M. Gates, who had been nominated to be director of Central Intelligence. I was asked because I had worked in the CIA's office of Soviet analysis back when Gates was the agency's deputy director for intelligence and chairman of the National Intelligence Council.
OPINION
October 1, 2006 | David Wise, David Wise, a Washington-based author, writes frequently about intelligence and secrecy.
LAST WEEK, ONE of Washington's favorite spectator sports -- the secrecy game -- reached new heights of absurdity. Americans were treated to the spectacle of an administration obsessed with secrecy turning around and declassifying parts of one of the most highly secret documents produced by the CIA and other U.S. intelligence agencies.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2006 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
Declassified portions of a high-level intelligence report released Tuesday describe the war in Iraq as a major catalyst for Islamic radicalism around the world, while also citing other causes for the expanding terrorist threat.
OPINION
October 1, 2006 | SONNI EFRON
Declassified portions of a National Intelligence Estimate released last week concluded that the war in Iraq has created new terrorists. Some experts predicted precisely that before the U.S. invasions of Iraq or Afghanistan. Current asked five of them what would they do now. --- The expert: Joseph Cirincione senior vice president for national security, Center for American Progress Prediction: "A U.S. invasion -- with or without a coalition behind it -- is going to spawn a massive new wave of recruits into terrorist ranks."
OPINION
October 1, 2006 | SONNI EFRON
Declassified portions of a National Intelligence Estimate released last week concluded that the war in Iraq has created new terrorists. Some experts predicted precisely that before the U.S. invasions of Iraq or Afghanistan. Current asked five of them what would they do now. --- The expert: Joseph Cirincione senior vice president for national security, Center for American Progress Prediction: "A U.S. invasion -- with or without a coalition behind it -- is going to spawn a massive new wave of recruits into terrorist ranks."
NATIONAL
September 27, 2006 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
Declassified portions of a high-level intelligence report released Tuesday describe the war in Iraq as a major catalyst for Islamic radicalism around the world, while also citing other causes for the expanding terrorist threat.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|