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National League Of Families Of American Prisoners Missing In Southeast Asia

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August 11, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her father had been missing in Indochina for nearly 25 years, and suddenly there was a controversial photograph of him, along with two other American MIA soldiers, somewhere in the jungle. Shelby Robertson Quast was desperate for information, and when she spotted Defense Secretary Dick Cheney at a POW-MIA meeting here last month, she made a beeline for his table.
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August 11, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her father had been missing in Indochina for nearly 25 years, and suddenly there was a controversial photograph of him, along with two other American MIA soldiers, somewhere in the jungle. Shelby Robertson Quast was desperate for information, and when she spotted Defense Secretary Dick Cheney at a POW-MIA meeting here last month, she made a beeline for his table.
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August 7, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade ago, many people considered Jack Bailey the best of men. He was praised as a humanitarian who had aided thousands of Southeast Asian refugees, hailed as a hero who had given desperate people a chance to live. One missionary called him "the most genuinely compassionate man I ever met." Then that Jack Bailey seemed to all but vanish, sinking into the murky realm where Americans haunted by Vietnam try to raise the dead--the presumed dead, that is.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Jane Maury Denton, 81, the wife of former U.S. Sen. Jeremiah Denton Jr., died Thursday at a Norfolk, Va., hospital of complications from a heart attack, family members said. The native of Mobile, Ala., helped organize the National League of Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia in the 1960s, after her husband, who was then a Navy pilot, was shot down and captured in 1965. He was held for nearly eight years in a North Vietnamese prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1998 | COLL METCALFE
The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library near Simi Valley will host a flag-raising ceremony to commemorate American prisoners of war and members of the armed forces who remain missing in action. The hourlong ceremony, which will begin at 11 a.m.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Vice President Dan Quayle told families of missing servicemen today that he'll never apologize for his Vietnam-era service in the National Guard, but that those who fought made a "far, far greater" sacrifice than he. Quayle noted his National Guard service, which became an issue in the 1988 presidential campaign, in a speech opening the 21st annual meeting of the 3,650-member National League of Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia.
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October 24, 1991 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Legion on Wednesday blasted the Bush Administration's move toward normal relations with Vietnam as a "tragedy," but other veterans groups gave cautious approval and said that they welcome the conditions set by Secretary of State James A. Baker III. Reaction from key members of Congress also was mixed, reflecting divisions that still linger in the nation nearly two decades after the Vietnam War ended. Dominic D.
NEWS
December 31, 1985 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
A high-level U.S. delegation will travel to Hanoi next week to discuss with Vietnamese officials the fate of Americans who were held prisoner or listed as missing in action during the Vietnam War, the State Department announced Monday. Assistant Defense Secretary Richard L. Armitage will lead the group, the highest-ranking U.S. mission to Vietnam since the war ended 10 years ago, State Department spokesman Charles Redman said. Accompanying Armitage will be Assistant Secretary of State Paul D.
NEWS
July 19, 1985 | Associated Press
To scattered boos and shouts of "Rambo! Rambo!," a congressional leader today told the families of U.S. servicemen missing in action that "the time has come for hard truths and blunt talk" about claims that there are still Americans held captive in Southeast Asia. Rep. Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.) told 800 relatives and friends of MIAs that resolving the fate of the 2,450 Americans missing in Indochina remains "a national obligation and moral responsibility."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2006 | From the Washington Post
Evelyn Fowler Grubb, a leader in gaining recognition for Vietnam-era prisoners of war and American military personnel missing in Southeast Asia, died Dec. 28 of breast cancer at her home in Melbourne, Fla. She was 74. As national coordinator of the National League of Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia in 1971 and 1972, Grubb played a part in creating the Arlington, Va.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1985 | TINA SUSMAN, Associated Press
Ask Jim Stockdale which Christmas he spent in Puerto Rico and you will get a blank stare. Ask him which Christmas he spent in leg irons and the memory flows. It was actually two Christmases, he tells you, in 1967 and 1968, when he was a prisoner in Hanoi during the Vietnam War. Ask Sybil Stockdale what she remembers most about her husband's confinement and she'll tell you about fall 1970, the five-year mark she had hoped would never come. It has been 20 years since Stockdale, the U.S.
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