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National Marine Fisheries Services

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1999 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying the proposal would bring wide, sandy beaches to much of Ventura County and protect threatened fish, dozens of environmentalists, scientists and officials from federal, state and local agencies met Monday to hash out a plan to dismantle Matilija Dam. After hearing from experts, the 60 participants agreed to name a task force to answer several critical questions. Chief among them is: Who would pay for such a massive and costly project?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1991 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An ambitious plan to increase Batiquitos Lagoon's value as a wildlife habitat by dredging millions of cubic yards of sediment from its shallow floor was approved Tuesday by the California Coastal Commission. The approval of the so-called "Blue Lagoon" plan was a clear victory for the city of Carlsbad, which had proposed that more than 3.7 million cubic yards of sediment be dredged from the 600-acre wetlands area to maintain an open flow of cleansing seawater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1988 | JENIFER WARREN, Times Staff Writer
The captain of a sportfishing boat pleaded guilty Tuesday in San Diego to violating the federal Marine Mammal Protection Act by firing a rifle at two California sea lions during a fishing trip last month. Under an agreement with federal prosecutors, Blaine Noel Hughes, 33, pleaded guilty to one misdemeanor count of violating the act while on an excursion near San Clemente Island on Oct. 22. He was sentenced to two years' supervised probation by federal U. S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1989 | TIM WATERS, Times Staff Writer
A woman who peered out the window of her waterfront apartment late at night and noticed "something moving on the beach" set off a rescue effort that returned two seemingly doomed dolphins to the ocean Monday morning. About 10 hours after Linda Clark spotted the dolphins foundering on Hermosa Beach, a team of rescuers pulled the two creatures into the water, waited for a wave, then used the outward current to propel them out to sea.
NATIONAL
August 10, 2002 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Justice Department lawyer, defending against environmentalists suing the Navy for its use of low-frequency sonar, ignored a White House office's objections to argue in court that a basic environmental law does not apply just outside U.S. waters, according to documents obtained by The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2008 | Laura Nott, H.G. Reza and Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writers
The attack was swift and deadly. A shark expert who examined the mangled body said the bite marks showed the classic pattern of a great white: Strike from underneath and then retreat quickly. Despite attempts by lifeguards at resuscitation, retired veterinarian Dave Martin, 66, a dedicated triathlete who swam every Friday with other fitness buffs, was declared dead just minutes after he was pulled from the water.
NEWS
November 25, 1992 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With rainfall already below average and reservoirs at the lowest levels since the historic drought of 1977, officials have quietly advised the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and other agencies to expect no more than 10% of requested deliveries from the State Water Project next year. "What we're projecting now is based on what we know we have. In other words, we are not extending our bank account," said John Silveira, deputy director of the state Water Resources Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1988 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writer
Holding that the rights of women to equal employment were never considered, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday overturned a San Diego federal court's ban on women government observers on tuna-fishing boats. The ban came in the form of preliminary injunctions granted in February and March, 1987, by U.S. District Judge William B.
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Ray Deiter figures that if he can't save the whales, he'll do the next best thing--find out why they died. In between treating ailing horses, dogs and assorted other creatures, the burly 41-year-old veterinarian has become a self-taught coroner for the whales, seals and sea lions that periodically wash ashore along the coast north and south of San Francisco. It's an unofficial position.
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