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NATIONAL
February 12, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The Los Alamos nuclear weapons laboratory is missing 69 computers, but no classified information has been lost, spokesman Kevin Roark said. The watchdog group Project on Government Oversight released a memo dated Feb. 3 from the Energy Department's National Nuclear Security Administration that said 67 computers were missing. Roark initially confirmed those figures but later updated them. He said 80 computers were lost or stolen in 2008, but 11 were recovered.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 10, 2010 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
The Energy Department said Tuesday it had fined Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, one of the nation's two nuclear weapons design centers, $200,000 for deficiencies in its program to protect workers from exposure to toxic beryllium dust. A consent order issued by the Energy Department's Office of Health, Safety and Security outlined a series of breakdowns at the lab, including failure to adequately control worker exposure, perform hazard assessments in buildings, measure the amount of beryllium in work areas and effectively train employees who work with the metal.
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NATIONAL
July 15, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Tribune Washington Bureau
Even as it touts U.S. efforts to sharply reduce its number of nuclear warheads, the Obama administration plans to increase spending on the aging nuclear weapons infrastructure to levels reminiscent of the Cold War, a new budget document shows. A 20-year spending plan from the agency that manages the nuclear arsenal shows that the administration wants to hike nuclear weapons spending to an average of more than $8 billion a year, compared with recent spending levels of $6 billion to $7 billion a year.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Tribune Washington Bureau
Even as it touts U.S. efforts to sharply reduce its number of nuclear warheads, the Obama administration plans to increase spending on the aging nuclear weapons infrastructure to levels reminiscent of the Cold War, a new budget document shows. A 20-year spending plan from the agency that manages the nuclear arsenal shows that the administration wants to hike nuclear weapons spending to an average of more than $8 billion a year, compared with recent spending levels of $6 billion to $7 billion a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2003 | Hilda Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Three mid-level security managers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have been suspended after a lost key card went unreported to top managers for six weeks. Lab officials put the men, who were not identified, on a two-week leave Monday. That same day, a team of investigators sent by the U.S. Energy Department's national nuclear security administrator, Linton Brooks, arrived to look into recent security lapses at the Bay Area lab.
OPINION
October 17, 1999
Robert Scheer (Commentary, Oct. 5) states that "we know" the theft of design information on the most sophisticated thermonuclear warhead in the U.S. arsenal, the W-88, "occurred during the Reagan administration." The Select Committee on U.S. National Security and Military/Commercial Concerns with the People's Republic of China warned against focusing on events prior to 1988 and the FBI and the Department of Justice have recently reopened their investigation. The arbitrary 1988 cutoff in the original espionage investigation is one of the reasons for its premature focus on Wen Ho Lee. Scheer implies that information about Lee "leaked from a congressional committee."
NATIONAL
November 10, 2010 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
The Energy Department said Tuesday it had fined Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, one of the nation's two nuclear weapons design centers, $200,000 for deficiencies in its program to protect workers from exposure to toxic beryllium dust. A consent order issued by the Energy Department's Office of Health, Safety and Security outlined a series of breakdowns at the lab, including failure to adequately control worker exposure, perform hazard assessments in buildings, measure the amount of beryllium in work areas and effectively train employees who work with the metal.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2009 | Ralph Vartabedian
A big earthquake and resultant fire could trigger potentially deadly releases of radioactive materials from Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico due to "major deficiencies" in the nuclear weapons lab's safety planning, federal safety experts warned Tuesday. The warning from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board was sent to Energy Secretary Steven Chu, urging him to "execute both immediate and long-term actions." A spokeswoman for the National Nuclear Security Administration, a part of the Energy Department, said, "We are currently evaluating the board's recommendation and preparing a formal response."
NATIONAL
May 7, 2004 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham is expected today to outline a sweeping upgrade of security at the nation's nuclear weapons sites, a move that reflects growing concern over the facilities' vulnerability to terrorist attack. The planned actions include the closing of several nuclear facilities, an improvement in cyber security for sensitive data and an overall strengthening of gates, guns and locks throughout the nuclear weapons complex, sources said.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2004 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
As President Bush and Sen. John F. Kerry wrestled over foreign policy in their first debate Thursday, some facts were oversimplified, others were exaggerated and still others dropped from sight entirely. No mistake was so glaring that it was likely to do lasting damage to a candidate. But as they grappled on the familiar territory of the Iraq war and related subjects, the combatants shaded the truth again and again in ways that echoed what they have said on the campaign trail.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2009 | Ralph Vartabedian
A big earthquake and resultant fire could trigger potentially deadly releases of radioactive materials from Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico due to "major deficiencies" in the nuclear weapons lab's safety planning, federal safety experts warned Tuesday. The warning from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board was sent to Energy Secretary Steven Chu, urging him to "execute both immediate and long-term actions." A spokeswoman for the National Nuclear Security Administration, a part of the Energy Department, said, "We are currently evaluating the board's recommendation and preparing a formal response."
NATIONAL
February 12, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The Los Alamos nuclear weapons laboratory is missing 69 computers, but no classified information has been lost, spokesman Kevin Roark said. The watchdog group Project on Government Oversight released a memo dated Feb. 3 from the Energy Department's National Nuclear Security Administration that said 67 computers were missing. Roark initially confirmed those figures but later updated them. He said 80 computers were lost or stolen in 2008, but 11 were recovered.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2004 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
As President Bush and Sen. John F. Kerry wrestled over foreign policy in their first debate Thursday, some facts were oversimplified, others were exaggerated and still others dropped from sight entirely. No mistake was so glaring that it was likely to do lasting damage to a candidate. But as they grappled on the familiar territory of the Iraq war and related subjects, the combatants shaded the truth again and again in ways that echoed what they have said on the campaign trail.
NATIONAL
May 7, 2004 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham is expected today to outline a sweeping upgrade of security at the nation's nuclear weapons sites, a move that reflects growing concern over the facilities' vulnerability to terrorist attack. The planned actions include the closing of several nuclear facilities, an improvement in cyber security for sensitive data and an overall strengthening of gates, guns and locks throughout the nuclear weapons complex, sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2003 | Hilda Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Three mid-level security managers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have been suspended after a lost key card went unreported to top managers for six weeks. Lab officials put the men, who were not identified, on a two-week leave Monday. That same day, a team of investigators sent by the U.S. Energy Department's national nuclear security administrator, Linton Brooks, arrived to look into recent security lapses at the Bay Area lab.
OPINION
October 17, 1999
Robert Scheer (Commentary, Oct. 5) states that "we know" the theft of design information on the most sophisticated thermonuclear warhead in the U.S. arsenal, the W-88, "occurred during the Reagan administration." The Select Committee on U.S. National Security and Military/Commercial Concerns with the People's Republic of China warned against focusing on events prior to 1988 and the FBI and the Department of Justice have recently reopened their investigation. The arbitrary 1988 cutoff in the original espionage investigation is one of the reasons for its premature focus on Wen Ho Lee. Scheer implies that information about Lee "leaked from a congressional committee."
NATIONAL
December 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The University of California has agreed to pay the federal government $2.8 million over a security breakdown at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Under the settlement, the university has accepted responsibility for the violations, the National Nuclear Security Administration said in a statement.
NEWS
June 30, 2000 | Associated Press
President Clinton has selected career intelligence officer John E. McLaughlin to serve in the No. 2 spot in the Central Intelligence Agency, CIA Director George J. Tenet announced Thursday. McLaughlin, 58, was chosen to succeed Air Force Gen. John Gordon, who was sworn in Wednesday as director of the new National Nuclear Security Administration in the Department of Energy. Once formally nominated, McLaughlin's post is subject to Senate confirmation.
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