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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Friday that the northeastern Pacific Ocean population of great white sharks is not in danger of extinction and does not warrant listing under the Endangered Species Act. NOAA had been researching the health of the great white population since last year, when the environmental groups Oceana, Shark Stewards and the Center for Biological Diversity filed a petition calling for endangered species...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO -- The passenger steamer was located once before in the murky depths. The year was 1890 and the City of Chester had gone down just two years prior after colliding with another ship in dense fog near the Golden Gate Bridge of today. On Wednesday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration -- successor to the agency that made the initial find by dragging a wire across the ocean floor -- announced the wreck has been located again. NOAA officials said they will share the story of the City of Chester through a planned waterfront exhibit at the San Francisco headquarters of the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary.
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NATIONAL
August 6, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - Last year was one of the 10 hottest since global average temperatures have been recorded, according to an assessment of worldwide climate trends by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "The State of the Climate in 2012," released Tuesday, paints a sobering portrait of vast swaths of the planet transformed by rising temperatures. Arctic sea ice reached record lows during the summer thaw. In Greenland, about 97% of its ice sheet melted in the summer, far greater than in years past.
SCIENCE
April 10, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
A weather-altering El Niño is increasingly likely to develop in the Pacific Ocean later this year, according to a U.S. government forecast issued Thursday. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration meteorologists now believe an El Niño has a 66% chance of forming by this winter. If the prediction materializes and the influential climate pattern sets in, it could bring wetter weather to California and the southern U.S., suppress the Atlantic hurricane season and compound global warming by boosting temperatures in 2015.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been doing some serious myth-busting after news reports this week claimed a massive island of debris from the 2011 Japan tsunami was headed for the U.S. West Coast. One problem: There is no floating mass of debris. The disaster swept millions of tons of material out to sea. While some has washed up on the West Coast and Hawaii, what remains afloat is widely scattered across the Pacific. The source of alarm was a map NOAA posted online without fanfare Sept.
SCIENCE
March 22, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Storms and snow notwithstanding, this winter was still warmer than average. The global temperature for December, January and February averaged 54.38 degrees Fahrenheit, 0.58 degree warmer than normal for the last century, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1995
Trying to understand the unusual weather? Check out the El Nino Theme Page at http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/toga-tao/el-nino/home.html, where the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration provides up-to-the-minute data on the powerful Pacific Ocean current that is believed to disrupt weather patterns worldwide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2000
State Sen. Ray Haynes (R-Riverside) says that God brought him to the Legislature and that God urged him to run for the U.S. Senate (Feb. 23). He also calls environmentalists "clean-air Nazis" and says global warming is hocus-pocus. On the same day "Climate Is Warming at Steep Rate, Study Says" reported that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, backed by the National Academy of Sciences, indicated that the Earth's climate is warming at an unprecedented rate. It may well be that Haynes' evangelical Christian right conservatives may one day inherit the Earth--a dead planet.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- As part of its campaign to step up efforts to address climate change, the White House on Wednesday announced the creation of a new website to serve as a one-stop location for the enormous amount of climate data housed at different federal agencies. The initiative to make the information more accessible to communities, researchers and industries trying to adapt to global warming is the latest move by the White House to deliver on a pledge that President Obama made last June to use his executive authority to address the causes and effects of climate change in light of congressional inaction on the issue.
NATIONAL
August 10, 2013 | By Benjamin Mueller
Federal forecasters have softened their prediction of an extreme storm season, trimming back the number of hurricanes they expect this year to between six and nine. That's a small drop from the seven to 11 hurricanes originally forecast in May, but the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's newer projections still threaten a highly active season. “Our confidence for an above-normal season is still high because the predicted atmospheric and oceanic conditions that are favorable for storm development have materialized,” Gary Bell, NOAA's lead hurricane forecaster, said this week.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- As part of its campaign to step up efforts to address climate change, the White House on Wednesday announced the creation of a new website to serve as a one-stop location for the enormous amount of climate data housed at different federal agencies. The initiative to make the information more accessible to communities, researchers and industries trying to adapt to global warming is the latest move by the White House to deliver on a pledge that President Obama made last June to use his executive authority to address the causes and effects of climate change in light of congressional inaction on the issue.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
Officials at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration found 25 dead pilot whales off Kice Island, Fla., on Thursday, adding to the state's high whale death toll. Although Blair Mase, NOAA stranding coordinator, said such incidents "come in spurts," the number of pilot whale strandings in the last year is higher than usual. "It's unusual and something we are looking at," Mase told reporters on Thursday. The 25 dead mammals -- 16 females and nine males -- were discovered just two days after eight other pilot whales were found dead about 40 miles north of Kice Island in Lovers Key. In December, 51 pilot whales were stranded in the Florida Everglades . Eleven died after beaching themselves in the Everglades and 11 others died in the Florida Keys, about 70 miles away.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - Last year was marked by extremes in precipitation around the country, with unusually wet weather east of the Rockies and drought worsening in the West, particularly California, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In its annual State of the Climate report, NOAA said California had its driest year on record in 2013, after receiving only 32.8% of its average annual precipitation. But the drought that extended over 61% of the country in January shrank to only 31% by December.
SCIENCE
January 9, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Forget the polar vortex and turn your eyes to the sky -- if you live in the right latitudes to catch the northern lights tonight. Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say there's a 90% chance of a strong geomagnetic storm on Thursday that will cause skies in northern latitudes to light up in brilliant and beautiful shades of greens and reds.  The storm could be strong enough that the auroras will be visible as...
SCIENCE
January 8, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Massive sunspot AR 1944 is getting feisty, and doing some damage. Several Earth-lengths across, it is one of the largest sunspots seen in a decade. It is also complex, with dozens of dark cores. "Sometimes you see a nice, big simple brown sunspot, and even though it's big, it's boring," said Alex Young of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. "But as soon as they start getting twisted and breaking apart and merging with each other, you know something exciting is going to happen.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been doing some serious myth-busting after news reports this week claimed a massive island of debris from the 2011 Japan tsunami was headed for the U.S. West Coast. One problem: There is no floating mass of debris. The disaster swept millions of tons of material out to sea. While some has washed up on the West Coast and Hawaii, what remains afloat is widely scattered across the Pacific. The source of alarm was a map NOAA posted online without fanfare Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2013 | By Tony Perry
For the second time in a week, a fish from a rarely seen species has washed up on the California coastline. A 14-foot oarfish carcass was discovered Friday by a snorkeler off the beach in Oceanside. On Sunday, an 18-foot-long oarfish carcass was spotted off Catalina Island. The oarfish, which can grow to more than 50 feet, is the world's largest bony fish and lives mostly at great depths. Because of its size and menacing appearance, the oarfish may be the source of the sea serpent tales.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2013 | By a Times Staff Writer, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
A 14-foot oarfish carcass found Friday on a Oceanside beach was taken away by scientists for possible study. Oceanside police responding to Friday's discovery contacted SeaWorld, the Scripps Institute of Oceanography and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The fish was cut into sections and taken away by NOAA. Photos show a group of surfers and beachgoers examining the creature. Authorities said that they received a call from a witness believing it was actually a washed-up whale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2013 | By Tony Perry
For the second time in a week, a fish from a rarely seen species has washed up on the California coastline. A 14-foot oarfish carcass was discovered Friday by a snorkeler off the beach in Oceanside. On Sunday, an 18-foot-long oarfish carcass was spotted off Catalina Island. The oarfish, which can grow to more than 50 feet, is the world's largest bony fish and lives mostly at great depths. Because of its size and menacing appearance, the oarfish may be the source of the sea serpent tales.
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