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National Organization For Women

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1994 | TERESA ANN WILLIS
A little more than a year ago, Sherri Foreman was murdered outside Great Western Bank in Sherman Oaks while using the automated teller machine. Today at 11 a.m., the San Fernando Valley chapter of the National Organization for Women will hold a news conference at the bank to remember Foreman and to highlight National Anti-Violence and Victims Rights Week. Foreman, 29 and pregnant when she died, was stabbed and left for dead behind the same wall that her killer hid behind before attacking her.
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NEWS
June 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit alleging that anti-abortion protesters violate racketeering and antitrust laws by demonstrating at abortion clinics. The 5-year-old lawsuit, filed by the National Organization for Women, sought an injunction against protests at abortion clinics around the country. NOW claims that demonstrators engage in extortion by threatening personnel, blocking entrances, trespassing and damaging equipment. U.S.
NEWS
August 25, 1991 | From Associated Press
Thousands of abortion rights advocates gathered Saturday on the banks of the Arkansas River to decry six weeks of protests by an anti-abortion group. "We are going toe-to-toe with these bullies," Patricia Ireland, president-elect of the National Organization for Women, said to the crowd.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
A national abortion rights group Tuesday removed Connecticut Gov. William A. O'Neill from a list of top political targets, reversing a stand the group took just three days earlier. The reversal by the National Abortion Rights Action League took O'Neill off a list that includes Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), Florida Gov. Bob Martinez and six other elected officials as political targets because of their anti-abortion views. "I have spoken with Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1996 | ROB O'NEIL
Local members of the National Organization for Women will picket a Van Nuys Mitsubishi dealership Thursday as part of an international effort to focus public attention on the extensive sexual harassment that the federal government says has occurred at Mitsubishi's assembly plant in Illinois. In April, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed one of the largest sexual harassment cases ever brought by the government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1999 | NEDA RAOUF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Organization for Women has vowed to renew its effort to pressure the media, the entertainment industry and the Federal Communications Commission to improve how women are portrayed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1990 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More women need to be elected in 1990 to state legislatures to overcome a "gender gap" that stifles progressive legislation, the president of the National Organization for Women said Friday night. Speaking before a crowd of 300 at Saddleback College, President Molly Yard said more candidates who favor abortion rights and other issues important to women must reach elective office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
The students at Cleveland High School in Reseda were nearly silent as they examined some 60 T-shirts hung shoulder-to-shoulder at the school's quad area Wednesday. The reason for their silence was the depiction of women's personal stories of sexual violence written on the T-shirts. Written on the shirts were such things as "He hurt me. I hate, I hurt," "I have survived domestic violence" and "Shatter the silence and stop the violence please!"
NEWS
August 25, 1987 | Associated Press
The National Organization for Women will sit out the 1988 presidential election unless Colorado Rep. Patricia Schroeder or another candidate acceptable to the group decides to run, NOW President Molly Yard said Monday. "We don't see yet presidential candidates who are going to lead this country any differently than it has been led in the last handful of years," Yard told reporters at a luncheon.
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | MICHAEL BLUMFIELD, Times Staff Writer
Angered by the Roman Catholic Church's stand on birth control, abortion, homosexuality and other issues, a coalition of women's and lay Catholic groups announced Thursday a series of protests before and during Pope John Paul II's visit to the United States in September. "It's bad enough that we're second class in the church," Eleanor Smeal, outgoing president of the National Organization for Women, said at a news conference. "To perpetuate that second-class status under the law is outrageous."
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