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BUSINESS
August 26, 1998 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gregory Freeman just got a loan for a truck he won't drive to haul tools he can't lift for handyman jobs he's unable to perform. The owner of Long Beach-based Son-Rise Cleaning Services will tell you that's progress. The entrepreneur with the quick smile and uncooperative legs is a recent graduate of the SEED Institute, an Irvine-based nonprofit that's battling stratospheric unemployment rates among the disabled by teaching them to run their own businesses.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1991 | MIKE WARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teacher Sandra (Sandy) Ball calls her effort to gain college admission for youngsters with learning disabilities "Project Turnabout," but the name also applies to her life. As a student at Claremont High School in the 1960s, Ball read so slowly that teachers advised her not to bother taking college entrance exams. Ball said she was afflicted with a seizure disorder for which she was given medicine that dulled her learning abilities. "I was made fun of something awful at school," she recalled.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1992 | ANDREA MAIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new law to prevent employers from discriminating against people with disabilities will take effect Sunday, filling gaps in existing legislation and for the first time creating a definitive civil rights act for 14 million potential workers. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the agency responsible for enforcing the act, has estimated that accommodations will cost businesses $16 million and that the commission itself will have to spend an additional $25 million in enforcement.
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | KELLY OWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Erecting monuments to American icons or fallen war heroes historically has proved much like democratic government itself: Regardless of the outcome, getting there sure was ugly. The route from inspiration to ribbon-cutting is a tortured one. First, it must be determined whether a person is significant enough to deserve a memorial--no small task in a nation of outspoken partisans.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
At first blush, it could almost pass as an ad for a Ferrari--or maybe even a Lamborghini. " Sleek best describes its narrow, tapered front. Get the edge . . . for life on the edge." The vehicle in the ad even has a racy name: the Rigid-Edge. But the ad is not for the latest European sports car. It's for a wheelchair. The advertisement, which appears in Careers & the Handicapped, a Greenlawn, N.Y.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1996 | LYNN WALFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Freelance writer Lynn Walford is the author of "Make Money With Your PC!" which includes resources for people with disabilities
The last thing David P. Rogers remembers seeing on that awful night nine years ago was a car tire flying toward him as he drove down the Harbor Freeway. It was actually a wheel and brake drum, and in the resulting crash, Rogers--a Harvard Medical School graduate with a brilliant career ahead of him, suffered a spinal injury that left him paralyzed almost completely from the neck down.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2005 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
Sixty years after his death, Franklin Delano Roosevelt remains largely an iconic figure, regarded by most scholars as the greatest president of the 20th century. The architect of the New Deal and Social Security as well as the U.S. involvement in World War II, FDR seems impressed on the public mind as the confident politician in a flowing cape, wearing a toothy grin that's gripping a cigarette holder at a jaunty angle.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | MIKE WARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teacher Sandra (Sandy) Ball calls her effort to gain college admission for youngsters with learning disabilities "Project Turnabout," but the name also applies to her life. As a student at Claremont High School in the 1960s, Ball read so slowly that teachers advised her not to bother taking college entrance exams. Ball said she was afflicted with a seizure disorder for which she was given medicine that dulled her learning abilities. "I was made fun of something awful at school," she recalled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
At the Maimonides Academy in Los Angeles this week, a roomful of bandits, cowboys, doctors and other costumed kids were kicking their Purim party into high gear. They merrily danced. They exchanged presents. They ate potato chips and traditional three-sided pastries.
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