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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2001 | From staff and wire reports
The city of Sausalito this week sued the National Park Service in U.S. District Court in San Francisco over a proposed redevelopment project at Ft. Baker. Mayor Paul Albritton said that although the city supports the $60-million conversion of the old Army base into a convention center, park officials have refused to enter into a binding agreement to assure that the expected 300,000 annual visitors to the center will not hurt the environment or cause traffic problems in Sausalito.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
May 14, 2009 | Michael E. Ruane, Ruane writes for the Washington Post.
The flashlight beam lighted up the dark interior of Abraham Lincoln's left boot as if the inside of a tomb, and there at the bottom was the smooth and shiny indentation made by the martyred president's heel. The odor of fine leather still clung to the top of the boot, where the white cloth pull straps were sewn. When the light hit a maroon section of the hide, boot maker Michael Anthony Carnacchi whispered, "Aha. There's your original color."
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NEWS
September 15, 1987 | JAMES QUINN, Times Staff Writer
San Fernando Valley developer Jerry Y. Oren was placed on five years' probation Monday and ordered to pay fines and restitution of more than $300,000 for using a fake letter to inflate the price of a Santa Monica Mountains tract he sold to the National Park Service. U.S. District Judge Harry L. Hupp also ordered Oren, 61, to perform 1,500 hours of community service work. Assistant U.S. Atty. Ralph F.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2009 | Julie Cart
Kate Cannon gazed across the high red desert to the snowy La Sal Mountains rising in sharp relief at the horizon. That view of uninterrupted nature is what draws nearly a million yearly visitors to this remote part of southeast Utah. "Look at the mountains," said Cannon, superintendent of Arches and neighboring Canyonlands national parks. "You can see them. Part of the majesty of this country is the grand sweeping views. The visitors do love it."
NATIONAL
August 26, 2005 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
A series of proposed revisions of National Park policy has created a furor among present and former park officials who believe the changes would weaken protections of natural resources and wildlife while allowing an increase in commercial activity, snowmobiles and off-road vehicles. National Park Service employees warn that the changes, which were proposed by the Department of the Interior and are undergoing a Park Service review, would fundamentally alter the agency's primary mission.
NEWS
January 28, 1999 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Park Service has concluded that a small chest touted as a dramatic discovery of 150-year-old Death Valley artifacts is filled with a hodgepodge of items dating into the 20th century. "The whole thing apparently was a hoax," said Tim Stone, public information officer for Death Valley National Park.
MAGAZINE
September 30, 1990 | Maura Dolan
A chain of low hills began to rise. Moving plates beneath the earth's crust pushed them skyward. They climbed imperceptibly at first, fractions of an inch over centuries. On the western flank of the central range, a river accelerated into a torrent. The crashing water cut a narrow, V-shaped canyon out of the granite. Twenty-three million years passed. An icecap enshrouded the summit of the range. Tongues of ice streamed down into the canyon. The ice thickened.
NEWS
April 26, 2005 | Mary Forgione, Times Staff Writer
Next month the Department of Agriculture will award a 3 1/2 -year contract to a private company that will streamline the way Americans make camping reservations at national parklands. Depending on which of three companies is selected, booking a campsite may feel like scoring concert tickets -- right down to the transaction fees.
NATIONAL
May 14, 2009 | Michael E. Ruane, Ruane writes for the Washington Post.
The flashlight beam lighted up the dark interior of Abraham Lincoln's left boot as if the inside of a tomb, and there at the bottom was the smooth and shiny indentation made by the martyred president's heel. The odor of fine leather still clung to the top of the boot, where the white cloth pull straps were sewn. When the light hit a maroon section of the hide, boot maker Michael Anthony Carnacchi whispered, "Aha. There's your original color."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1987 | JAMES QUINN, Times Staff Writer
Encino developer Jerry Y. Oren was convicted by a Los Angeles federal court jury Wednesday of using a fake letter to inflate the price of a Santa Monica Mountains land parcel he sold to the National Park Service. The U.S. District Court jury deliberated less than two hours before convicting Oren of scheming to cheat the government in the 1985 sale of 336 oak-covered acres in Agoura's Cheeseboro Canyon.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2008 | Nicholas Riccardi, Times Staff Writer
The southern half of this swath of grasslands and chiseled pink spires looks untouched from a distance. Closer up, the scars of history are easy to see. Unexploded bombs lie in ravines, a reminder of when the military confiscated the land from the Oglala Sioux tribe during World War II and turned it into an artillery range. Poachers who have stolen thousands of fossils over the years have left gouges in the landscape.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2007 | Alison Williams, Times Staff Writer
Yosemite National Park has escaped a nationwide increase in national park fees. On Jan. 1, entrance fees to parks nationwide will jump, some to $25. But last week, the director of the National Park Service issued a waiver to Yosemite, allowing the park to leave its fee at $20 until at least 2009. This fee allows a carload of people to enter the park for one week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
National Park Service biologists said two bald eagles have an egg in their nest on Santa Cruz Island, their second in as many years. More significant is that the egg might mean bald eagles can reproduce naturally in the Channel Islands. The number of eagles on the islands declined in the 1960s because of over-hunting and the heavy use of the chemical DDT.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2007 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
Edith Ann pokes her head shyly from inside a horse stall on a hilly tract of national parkland here. Volunteer Susana Ives rattles a bag of snacks and the petite 28-year-old mare nods hungrily. "She can still hear a raisin bag at 50 yards," said Ives, stroking the docile brown quarter horse, who would be about 84 in human years. "Does this look like a horse at death's door? Not to me."
NEWS
March 1, 2007 | Libby Slate, Special to The Times
EVERY weekend for the last 15 months, K.C. Durfee has boarded the National Park Service's ParkLINK shuttle for a scenic tour of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, winding through rocky canyons, enjoying panoramic ocean views, seeing colorful wildflowers and other vegetation, spotting the occasional horse and rider. Once in a while, she'll disembark for some beach time at Zuma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2007 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
An animal rights group that fought unsuccessfully to block the slaughter of thousands of feral pigs on Santa Cruz Island has sued the National Park Service and the Nature Conservancy this week, hoping to block further killing of wild turkeys on the island off the Ventura County coast. "We filed suit because we have to break this cycle of slaughter, slaughter, slaughter without looking at the long-term ramifications," said Elliot M.
NEWS
February 8, 1998 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's so quiet out here you can almost hear the shadows tugging violet twilight over the desert dunes. This is national parkland, a remote wedge of hushed mountains and sandy slopes, a place so cherished for its serenity that Congress has granted it the highest possible degree of protection by declaring it a wilderness area. It's also the site of the Rainbow Talc Mine. The mine is inactive now. But owners Carol and Edward Baumunk want to rev it up again.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2009 | Julie Cart
Kate Cannon gazed across the high red desert to the snowy La Sal Mountains rising in sharp relief at the horizon. That view of uninterrupted nature is what draws nearly a million yearly visitors to this remote part of southeast Utah. "Look at the mountains," said Cannon, superintendent of Arches and neighboring Canyonlands national parks. "You can see them. Part of the majesty of this country is the grand sweeping views. The visitors do love it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2006 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
As the National Park Service begins planning for its 100th birthday in 2016, the venerable agency has reason to wonder who will show up. By the service's own reckoning, visits to national parks have been on a downward slide for 10 years. Overnight stays fell 20% between 1995 and 2005, and tent camping and backcountry camping each decreased nearly 24% during the same period. Visits are down at almost all national parks, even at Yosemite, notorious for summertime crowds and traffic jams.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2006 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
Despite the conclusions from its own scientists that snowmobiles in Yellowstone National Park continue to create unacceptable noise levels, the National Park Service released a draft plan Monday that would allow up to 720 snow machines in the park per day. The plan would maintain the current maximum daily numbers, or about three times as many snowmobiles as entered the park each day over the last three winters.
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