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NEWS
January 28, 1999 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Park Service has concluded that a small chest touted as a dramatic discovery of 150-year-old Death Valley artifacts is filled with a hodgepodge of items dating into the 20th century. "The whole thing apparently was a hoax," said Tim Stone, public information officer for Death Valley National Park.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
National Park Service biologists said two bald eagles have an egg in their nest on Santa Cruz Island, their second in as many years. More significant is that the egg might mean bald eagles can reproduce naturally in the Channel Islands. The number of eagles on the islands declined in the 1960s because of over-hunting and the heavy use of the chemical DDT.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1987 | JAMES QUINN, Times Staff Writer
Encino developer Jerry Y. Oren was convicted by a Los Angeles federal court jury Wednesday of using a fake letter to inflate the price of a Santa Monica Mountains land parcel he sold to the National Park Service. The U.S. District Court jury deliberated less than two hours before convicting Oren of scheming to cheat the government in the 1985 sale of 336 oak-covered acres in Agoura's Cheeseboro Canyon.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2006 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
Despite the conclusions from its own scientists that snowmobiles in Yellowstone National Park continue to create unacceptable noise levels, the National Park Service released a draft plan Monday that would allow up to 720 snow machines in the park per day. The plan would maintain the current maximum daily numbers, or about three times as many snowmobiles as entered the park each day over the last three winters.
NEWS
February 8, 1998 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's so quiet out here you can almost hear the shadows tugging violet twilight over the desert dunes. This is national parkland, a remote wedge of hushed mountains and sandy slopes, a place so cherished for its serenity that Congress has granted it the highest possible degree of protection by declaring it a wilderness area. It's also the site of the Rainbow Talc Mine. The mine is inactive now. But owners Carol and Edward Baumunk want to rev it up again.
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the radiance of autumn succumbs to advancing winter, the spirits of Yosemite rangers are tumbling with the golden alder leaves. Fewer welcoming smiles shoot from beneath the brims of their Smokey Bear hats, a clue that something is amiss in one of America's favorite national parks. Defined narrowly, the rangers' dark mood stems from a landlord-tenant spat.
NEWS
August 8, 1988 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
As a high-tech explorer begins rising through 1,500 feet of frigid water in this volcanic lake, total darkness gives way to an eerie gray glow above him. It is the summer sunlight. At 1,200 feet--about as deep as the Empire State Building is tall--the sun's rays still penetrate the dazzlingly clear waters of the nation's deepest lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1992, Ricardo Capretta made his parents and a few of their retired friends a no-lose proposition: Forget about bank certificates of deposit paying 3% a year, and invest instead in a government-backed $350,000 promissory note on a tract of land in the Santa Monica Mountains guaranteed to pay 8% a year. "We thought it was a very safe investment," he said.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stanislaus National Forest has completed acquisition of Bower Cave, which historians say was known to Indians hundreds of years ago. The deal involved a land exchange with Fibreboard Corp. under which the Park Service obtained the 855-acre Linkletter Ranch, including the historic cave. Miwok Indians called the Mariposa County cave Oo-tin , meaning Home of the early Star and in the 1870s gold miners used the cave as a dance hall.
NEWS
March 19, 1992 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seated next to a crackling fire, Gary Overson tugs at his cowboy hat and shoots a stream of tobacco juice into a brass spittoon. "I'm a prejudiced son of a gun. I love cattle," he drawls. "I've been here all my life and I don't want to see any changes. But there is goin' to be changes. People are comin'." Overson is a throwback to a bygone era when Americans worked the land seven days a week and nearly everyone ate beef.
NATIONAL
October 3, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Mary A. Bomar, a British native, has been confirmed by the Senate as director of the National Park Service. Bomar, who became a U.S. citizen in 1977, has worked at the Park Service for 17 years. She succeeds Fran Mainella.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2006
Fran P. Mainella, director of the National Park Service since 2001, will resign from the agency that has been at odds with environmentalists and Westerners. Critics have said the agency put too much emphasis on recreation, shifting its focus from conservation. Mainella recently oversaw a controversial rewrite of park management policies. A Park Service news release said Mainella was leaving to devote more time to her family.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2006 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration on Monday reversed a proposed policy that would have opened some of America's national parks to snowmobiles and other motorized recreation and permitted increased commercialization.
NATIONAL
June 16, 2006 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
A survey conducted by a group of retired National Park Service employees concludes that strained budgets have rendered the national parks less safe for visitors and have left wildlife, historic and cultural resources less protected. The survey found that staff reductions had eliminated backcountry patrols, lengthened emergency response times and decreased monitoring of protected species and park resources. "This is not just about some more litter and some outhouses being locked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
National Park Service crews clearing brush this week stumbled onto World War II-era trenches hastily dug after the attack on Pearl Harbor. They were intended to be the last lines of defense against a Japanese attack that never hit the shores of the continental United States. The dozen trenches are about 5 feet deep, and some still bear remnants of mounts for .30-caliber machine guns. The park service is not releasing the precise location of the trenches until archeologists sweep the area.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge has ordered the National Park Service to pay $4 million to the owners of an observation tower that once stood near Gettysburg National Military Park. The federal government acquired the land by eminent domain in 2000 and demolished the steel structure as part of a campaign to restore the area to the way it looked during the Civil War. Creator Thomas R. Ottenstein called the 393-foot tower, which opened in 1974, a "classroom in the sky."
MAGAZINE
November 26, 1995 | Barry Siegel, Barry Siegel, a Times national correspondent, is the author of "A Death in White Bear Lake" and "Shades of Gray," both published by Bantam. His last article for the magazine was about a Death Row case in Illinois.
Bouncing along a twisting, potholed dirt road, Guy Pence appears oblivious to the mountain trail's crumbling edges and hairpin turns. The tires of his government-issue Jeep are inches from a sheer drop, but Pence is busy scanning the forest around him. The fire came over the hill right there, he explains. Burned 18,000 acres in August, 1994. Before it hit, his people had a timber sale to reduce overgrowth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1993 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beyond the scruffy bunch grass and the gnarled valley oaks, beyond the sparkling creek and the time-etched rocks, a clearing known as China Flat overlooks tiers of distant mountains--a spectacular vantage point that will soon open to the public for the first time in decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2005 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
National Park Service biologists have begun releasing endangered foxes on two of the eight Channel Islands, part of a captive breeding program begun six years ago to protect the species. The releases of 40 adult foxes and pups began this month and will continue through November. The plan calls for 23 on San Miguel Island and 17 on Santa Rosa Island, which are 55 miles and 40 miles west of Ventura, respectively.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2005 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
A House committee chaired by Rep. Richard Pombo is considering a list of budgetary actions that includes selling off 15 national park sites around the country, requiring the park service to raise money by selling millions of dollars in advertising, and opening coastal waters and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling.
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