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NEWS
December 19, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The National Parks Service plans to relocate the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, the nation's oldest and tallest brick lighthouse, once it can be strengthened for the move. The black and white striped 208-foot-tall lighthouse at Cape Hatteras, N.C., is threatened by wave action since sand dunes have eroded and can no longer protect it. When the lighthouse was built in 1870, it was 1,500 feet from the Atlantic Ocean. It currently is 160 feet from the ocean.
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NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - She was called the "the most famous woman in Los Angeles. " That was how the wife of famed "Pathfinder" John C. Fremont was described in her Los Angeles Times obituary in 1902. Though she is not as well known today, she could be on the way to gaining a higher profile - one more than 12,100 feet high. Legislation to name a mountain peak in Yosemite National Park as Mt. Jessie Benton Fremont is now before Congress. Related: The ultimate guide to Yosemite The measure, a tribute to Jessie Benton Fremont's efforts to preserve the land that would become the park, comes on this year's 150th anniversary of President Lincoln signing the bill granting Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove, a stand of some of the world's largest trees, to the state of California as a public trust.
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OPINION
June 11, 2013
Re "Preserving atomic history," Opinion, June 7 Though Stephanie Meeks seems to be convinced that a Manhattan Project National Park would provide space for thoughtful reflection about the legacy of nuclear weapons, there is strong reason to believe this would not be the case. Meeks states that the park would be jointly managed by the National Parks Service and the Department of Energy. The DOE is still very much in the business of manufacturing nuclear weapons. For example, its B61 program will spend billions to give new military capabilities and decades more of existence to an obsolete nuclear bomb that we deploy in five European countries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2014 | By James Rainey
For 27 straight summers, all that stood between runners and completion of the Badwater Ultramarathon was 135 miles of asphalt, a 13,000-foot elevation gain and late July temperatures that soared to 120 degrees and above. They called it "the toughest foot race in the world. " And not too many people argued. But this summer, the race from the depths of Death Valley to the shoulders of Mt. Whitney has been moved, while the National Park Service conducts a "safety assessment" of the run and other athletic events.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1995 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David E. Gackenbach, a low-key career federal parks official who oversaw a large expansion of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area in Los Angeles and Ventura counties in his five years as superintendent, is retiring, a spokeswoman said Friday. Gackenbach, 51, took a voluntary buyout offer from the National Parks Service and is expected to depart next month, said spokeswoman Jean Bray. A replacement has not been named. Gackenbach could not be reached for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1995 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An environmental group that once supported congressional efforts to overhaul the National Park Service is now distancing itself from the Republican-sponsored plan, warning that it could have a devastating impact on Ventura County's two federal parks. However, Rep. Elton Gallegly (R-Simi Valley), who has signed onto the legislation as a co-sponsor, contends that the National Parks and Conservation Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1999 | STEVE CHAWKINS
The sailors who served with and beside Capt. Ken Walden had nothing but good to say of him. He had a marvelous sense of humor. When morale was low, he could be counted on to boost it. And he worked at least as hard as anyone he supervised; he didn't let colon cancer interfere with his job commanding the missile range at Point Mugu, until there was no choice. Walden, a highly decorated Vietnam vet, died in 1989 at the age of 47.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1997
The operation of a 16-year-old program that annually teaches tens of thousands of children about the outdoors has been taken over permanently by the National Park Service, officials said Wednesday. Since the program's inception in 1981, funds had to be raised every year to support the William O. Douglas Outdoor Classroom in Franklin Canyon Park, said John Diaz, president of the program's board of directors. But a bill sponsored by Rep. Howard L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1993 | KURT PITZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was February, 1776, and as revolution brewed among English colonists on the East Coast, a Spanish explorer named Juan Bautista de Anza was leading 240 settlers to establish what would become the city of San Francisco. Despite hunger, Indian uprisings, disease and desertion, the Spanish had no time to waste, fearing the expansion of Russian colonization from the Aleutian Islands southward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1994
A proper response must be made to Michael McCalley's charge that the National Park Service is a "Gestapo-like organization" (letter, May 2). I have never encountered or observed a park ranger treating visitors without professional respect and helpfulness, in any of my visits to over 40 national park units in the last five years. I have seen park visitors bring their own problems to a park and deliberately break clearly posted park rules, commit damage to the environment, or bring harm to property or others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
GROVELAND, Calif. - As the Rim fire has burned into Yosemite National Park and into the record books, it has been watched around the world. From Washington, D.C., National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis said he monitored the blaze's progress daily as flames threatened Sierra Nevada communities, ancient sequoia groves and the reservoir that holds San Francisco's water supply. On Saturday, he went to see the blaze firsthand. "This is a gnarly fire," Jarvis told firefighters at a morning briefing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A 65-year-old retired physicist and park volunteer with a passion for nature died this week when he tried to board a boat and fell, seriously injuring his head, officials said Thursday. Joe Wysocki began volunteering at Channel Islands National Park in the mid-1990s as a naturalist. Wysocki was "highly valued for his skills as an audio visual technician and camera operator for the park's distance learning program Channel Islands Live," officials said. Wysocki's fall was described as an accident that occurred Wednesday about 3:15 p.m. at Anacapa Island, where "Wysocki fell off the landing dock ladder as he was boarding the National Park Service (NPS)
NATIONAL
July 9, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON - Facing flak for proposing to eliminate some popular tourist amenities in Yosemite National Park, the National Park Service said it needed five more months to finish a plan to "protect and enhance" the Merced River, which runs for 81 miles inside the park. Kathleen Morse, the park's chief of planning, said Tuesday that officials intended to complete the plan by the end of the year rather than this month. The effort to restore the river corridor and habitat to their natural states has been overshadowed by controversy, she said.
OPINION
June 11, 2013
Re "Preserving atomic history," Opinion, June 7 Though Stephanie Meeks seems to be convinced that a Manhattan Project National Park would provide space for thoughtful reflection about the legacy of nuclear weapons, there is strong reason to believe this would not be the case. Meeks states that the park would be jointly managed by the National Parks Service and the Department of Energy. The DOE is still very much in the business of manufacturing nuclear weapons. For example, its B61 program will spend billions to give new military capabilities and decades more of existence to an obsolete nuclear bomb that we deploy in five European countries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2013 | Louis Sahagun
Interior Secretary Ken Salazar on Wednesday recommended designation of the San Gabriel River watershed and most of the San Gabriel Mountains as a national recreation area, making the popular playground eligible for additional law enforcement, interpretive signs, hiking trails, trash collection and other services. Salazar's long-awaited recommendation to Congress seeks to balance a crush of tourists with conservation. The designation would transform the 655,000-acre range, portions of the San Gabriel River and Rio Hondo corridors and Puente-Chino Hills into a unit of the National Park system co-managed by the National Park Service, federal officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Political leaders and outdoors enthusiasts expressed dismay Thursday over new details about an Interior Department recommendation for changes in federal management of a popular region of the San Gabriel Mountains. "The proposal raises many questions, and I want answers from the National Park Service and the U.S. Forest Service as to why this hybrid came about," U.S. Rep. Judy Chu (D-Monterey Park) said in an interview. The Interior Department announced Wednesday that it is recommending to Congress that the U.S. Forest Service and the National Park Service collaborate in the region, which includes a portion of the Angeles National Forest stretching from Sylmar to roughly five miles west of Interstate 15. Under the proposal, the region essentially would remain national forest land managed by the cash-strapped Forest Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A 65-year-old retired physicist and park volunteer with a passion for nature died this week when he tried to board a boat and fell, seriously injuring his head, officials said Thursday. Joe Wysocki began volunteering at Channel Islands National Park in the mid-1990s as a naturalist. Wysocki was "highly valued for his skills as an audio visual technician and camera operator for the park's distance learning program Channel Islands Live," officials said. Wysocki's fall was described as an accident that occurred Wednesday about 3:15 p.m. at Anacapa Island, where "Wysocki fell off the landing dock ladder as he was boarding the National Park Service (NPS)
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
If you're a Civil War buff or you're planning a trip to a Civil War site, a new  National Park Service website can help you. Even if you're not going anywhere, the website is fascinating to browse, from its lists of places to visit to its facts to the people who played major roles in the war. I'm not sure it's as popular as the recently released 1940 Census data that slowed traffic on that site to a crawl this week,...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
ANACAPA ISLAND - Just as factories brag about their accident-free days, Channel Islands National Park is showing off this rugged island's rat-free decade. To get rid of Rattus rattus , officials had a helicopter shower one-square-mile of Anacapa with poisonous green pellets in 2001 and 2002. On Wednesday, they ferried a boatload of reporters and scientists to the square-mile chain of three islets and declared victory. "The last thing we needed was a project that got only 99.9% of all the island's rats," said Kate Faulkner, a National Park Service biologist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
POINT REYES NATIONAL SEASHORE - To hear Kevin Lunny tell it, he's just a little guy, draining his life's savings to stand up to a heartless federal agency bent on closing down his family's oyster farm here. It's a compelling tale, a years-long soap opera replete with allegations of scientific misconduct and government overreach. Tea party activists have taken up his cause, citing it as an example of government quashing free enterprise and environmentalism run amok. Lunny also has the support of powerhouse conservative law firms representing him pro bono, and Cause of Action, a Washington, D.C.-based government watchdog group with ties to the conservative Koch brothers.
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