Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNational Parks Utah
IN THE NEWS

National Parks Utah

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Springdale Mayor Robert Ralston maneuvered his Ford LTD through the winding back roads of this labyrinth of sculpted, multicolored canyons and smugly shook his finger at a cluster of modest, boxy-looking houses for park employees. "Did the park ask the town if they could build that?" demanded the 69-year-old mayor, peering out from beneath his royal-blue baseball cap at one of the prefabricated park dwellings. "They didn't ask the town nothing. But they try and tell us what we can do."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 4, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
A federal jury in Salt Lake City on Thursday convicted a 29-year-old environmental activist of two felonies for bidding for public lands being auctioned off to energy companies by the George W. Bush administration. Tim DeChristopher won bids in December 2008 totaling $1.79 million for more than 22,000 acres near Arches and Canyonlands national parks that the administration was offering to lease for oil and gas exploration. DeChristopher did not have the money, and he has said he bid in an attempt to delay or block the energy leases ?
Advertisement
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER and FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton officially set aside 1.7 million acres of Utah canyon lands Wednesday as a national monument, with some concessions to Utah authorities who complained the move would stunt the local economy and block a job-generating coal mine. Standing against the sweeping backdrop of the Grand Canyon, Clinton declared that in creating the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument "we are keeping faith with the future. . . . On this remarkable site, God's handiwork is everywhere."
TRAVEL
April 20, 2008 | By Susan Spano, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
"Most of what follows is true. " That's the opening of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," the 1969 movie about two bandits born as the sun was setting over the mesas and buttes of the old Wild West. Morally ambiguous, the movie struck a chord with Vietnam War-era audiences who stood and cheered when Paul Newman as Butch and Robert Redford as Sundance met a hail of bullets in a dusty Bolivian town, etching the final freeze frame onto my 15-year-old heart. I didn't know it then, but the movie wrote something else there: a love of the sumptuous Western scenery, which I rediscovered on a trip last month to southern Utah.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | DEBORAH SCHOCH and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush is moving to establish his first national monument, which would protect Utah's San Rafael Swell, a dramatic sweep of desert canyons where environmentalists have long sought stronger federal protection. Utah's Republican governor, Mike Leavitt, announced in a speech Monday evening that state and local officials will request creation of San Rafael National Monument on a 620,000-acre expanse that was once a hiding place for Butch Cassidy.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2008 | By Susan Spano, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
"Most of what follows is true. " That's the opening of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," the 1969 movie about two bandits born as the sun was setting over the mesas and buttes of the old Wild West. Morally ambiguous, the movie struck a chord with Vietnam War-era audiences who stood and cheered when Paul Newman as Butch and Robert Redford as Sundance met a hail of bullets in a dusty Bolivian town, etching the final freeze frame onto my 15-year-old heart. I didn't know it then, but the movie wrote something else there: a love of the sumptuous Western scenery, which I rediscovered on a trip last month to southern Utah.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
A federal jury in Salt Lake City on Thursday convicted a 29-year-old environmental activist of two felonies for bidding for public lands being auctioned off to energy companies by the George W. Bush administration. Tim DeChristopher won bids in December 2008 totaling $1.79 million for more than 22,000 acres near Arches and Canyonlands national parks that the administration was offering to lease for oil and gas exploration. DeChristopher did not have the money, and he has said he bid in an attempt to delay or block the energy leases ?
NEWS
March 15, 2005 | Scott Doggett
A pair of veteran outdoorsmen have founded a new, long-distance hiking trail across the Southwest canyonlands and released a guidebook this month to help people navigate it. Named after a character in Edward Abbey's "The Monkey Wrench Gang," the 810-mile Hayduke Trail traverses Zion, Grand Canyon and Arches national parks in Utah and northern Arizona. The undesignated path follows trails, unpaved roads, cattle and game routes, ridges and washes.
MAGAZINE
October 27, 2002 | LISA LEFF, Lisa Leff is a freelance writer living in Ventura. Her last article for the magazine was about the fate of Los Angeles County's unidentified dead.
The California Hotel & Casino isn't what people imagine when they think of the "new" Las Vegas. It wasn't built to resemble a pyramid, a medieval castle or anything more architecturally ambitious than a pair of towers that would be at home near any major airport. Situated on the edge of downtown, three miles northeast of the glitzy Strip and three blocks from the city's secondary gambling district, Glitter Gulch, the California offers little in the way of location.
NATIONAL
April 14, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
Mining claims threaten to mar the borders of 10 iconic national parks and wilderness areas, particularly the Grand Canyon, where uranium claims have increased 2,000% since 2004, according to a new report by the Pew Environment Group. Mining companies have filed claims to the rights to copper, gold and other metals in addition to uranium in areas around Mt. Rushmore, Joshua Tree National Park and other famous refuges at an increased rate in the last five to seven years because of rising global prices, the Pew report said.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | DEBORAH SCHOCH and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush is moving to establish his first national monument, which would protect Utah's San Rafael Swell, a dramatic sweep of desert canyons where environmentalists have long sought stronger federal protection. Utah's Republican governor, Mike Leavitt, announced in a speech Monday evening that state and local officials will request creation of San Rafael National Monument on a 620,000-acre expanse that was once a hiding place for Butch Cassidy.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER and FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton officially set aside 1.7 million acres of Utah canyon lands Wednesday as a national monument, with some concessions to Utah authorities who complained the move would stunt the local economy and block a job-generating coal mine. Standing against the sweeping backdrop of the Grand Canyon, Clinton declared that in creating the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument "we are keeping faith with the future. . . . On this remarkable site, God's handiwork is everywhere."
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Springdale Mayor Robert Ralston maneuvered his Ford LTD through the winding back roads of this labyrinth of sculpted, multicolored canyons and smugly shook his finger at a cluster of modest, boxy-looking houses for park employees. "Did the park ask the town if they could build that?" demanded the 69-year-old mayor, peering out from beneath his royal-blue baseball cap at one of the prefabricated park dwellings. "They didn't ask the town nothing. But they try and tell us what we can do."
OPINION
August 30, 2004
It's a bit hard to fathom why the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power has been planning to invest as much as $400 million in the expansion of a giant air-polluting, coal-fired power plant in Utah just as pollution-free renewable sources of electricity are coming into common use and becoming more affordable. Fortunately, Mayor James K. Hahn last week ordered the DWP to pull the plug on this dinosaur of a power plant, telling the department to spend the money on renewables instead.
OPINION
August 17, 2010
Perhaps a name change is in order for some agencies under the U.S. Interior Department umbrella. These days at least two of them would more accurately be referred to as the Minerals Mismanagement Service and the Bureau of Land Mismanagement. The Minerals Management Service is charged with overseeing offshore oil and gas leases; it's the agency that failed to require a realistic emergency response plan from BP before giving its Deepwater Horizon rig permission to drill. It has also been at the center of assorted scandals involving employees who accepted gifts or solicited jobs from the oil companies they were supposed to regulate.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|