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January 8, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Paul Crouch Quits: The founder and president of Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network has resigned from the National Religious Broadcasters, citing "trumped-up charges" against his television ministry. Paul Crouch, who founded the religious network in 1974, was the subject of an inquiry by the NRB ethics committee, which investigated complaints about his business practices and the treatment of Trinity employees.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2002
NASHVILLE--The president of the National Religious Broadcasters resigned after complaints about a newspaper interview in which he said the group should not lose focus on spiritual issues as it pursues political goals. The board of the broadcasters group voted to accept the resignation of Wayne Pederson, who had served in the post since October.
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NEWS
February 2, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Paul F. Crouch, founder and president of Orange County-based Trinity Broadcasting Network, is the subject of an investigation by the ethics committee of the National Religious Broadcasters, according to Richard Bott Sr., chairman of the committee. The investigation, examining some of Crouch's business practices, could lead to his expulsion from the voluntary organization.
NEWS
January 26, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 5,000 evangelical broadcasters, programmers and vendors began assembling at the Anaheim Convention Center on Saturday to study the Internet as the next missionary frontier, learn to appeal to Generation X-ers and exchange ideas with people of "kindred spirit."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1989 | From Religious News Service
The Rev. Robert A. Cook, chancellor of The King's College in Briarcliff Manor, N.Y., and speaker on "The King's Hour" radio program, has been named interim executive director of National Religious Broadcasters. He succeeds the Rev. Ben Armstrong, who retired Sept. 1 after 23 years at the organization's administrative helm. Cook served as president of the broadcasters' organization from 1985 to 1988 and is also a past president of the National Assn. of Evangelicals.
NEWS
May 19, 1989
A committee of the National Religious Broadcasters has urged Paul F. Crouch, president of Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network, to seek "Christian arbitration" to resolve a bitter dispute with a former business associate. The decision appears to be at least a partial victory for Crouch's longtime adversary, the Rev. Keith A. Houser of Dallas, who has sought such a resolution for nearly three years. The NRB's five-member Ethics Committee strongly recommended that Crouch and Houser submit the "alleged business practices that relate to contractual disputes" to "a recognized Board of Christian Arbitration."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2002
NASHVILLE--The president of the National Religious Broadcasters resigned after complaints about a newspaper interview in which he said the group should not lose focus on spiritual issues as it pursues political goals. The board of the broadcasters group voted to accept the resignation of Wayne Pederson, who had served in the post since October.
NEWS
December 24, 1988 | From Religious News Service
Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson are among 29 television preachers whose ministries have been investigated in the last year by the Internal Revenue Service. Spokesmen for the two religious broadcasters confirmed that they were among those involved in a report that was recently sent to the oversight subcommittee of the House Ways and Means Committee by Assistant IRS Commissioner Robert I. Brauer. The probes were a follow-up to an October, 1987, hearing called by Rep. J. J. Pickle (D-Tex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1987 | GEORGE W. CORNELL, Associated Press
Finely groomed and suited, they beckon their audiences to happiness and heaven. Their prescriptions vary from stiff to gentle, demanding to soothing, conversational to vehement. But they share a common pursuit--promoting faith and followings. They are the shepherds of the "electronic church," and it is booming in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1997 | JOHN DART
The National Religious Broadcasters, opening a four-day convention today at the Anaheim Convention Center, expects the association's largest registration ever for its 54th annual meeting. About 5,000 broadcasters and related professionals, many from the Christian evangelical fold, are expected to register, said Michael Glenn, vice president of the association.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1993 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Alarmed that Christian radio and television stations may be forced to air the views of homosexuals, the nation's religious broadcasters said Wednesday that they will mount a major effort to block Congress from reinstituting the fairness doctrine. The doctrine, repealed by the Federal Communications Commission in 1987 under President Reagan, is viewed as a formidable threat to plans by many of the nation's 800 Christian radio and television stations to campaign for "family values."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1993 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Amid controversies over the showing of an explicit film on abortion and a gala event to salute Hollywood, the National Religious Broadcasters open their 50th annual convention today at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The meeting--expected to attract several thousand religious broadcasters, including evangelist and 1988 presidential candidate Pat Robertson, Lloyd Ogilvie and others--will mark the first time the group has met since President Clinton's election last November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1992 | GUSTAV NIEBUHR, THE WASHINGTON POST
About 15 minutes into the "Hour of Power," one of television's most-watched religious broadcasts, the program cuts from the choir to a commercial. It's the host, the Rev. Robert Schuller, asking viewers to send him $30, to "keep this television ministry on the air every week." The appeal is short and upbeat. Schuller--described on his show as "the face and voice of positive Christianity"--never loses his smile.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
For President Bush, a lifelong Episcopalian, finding moral justification for war was apparently important enough to listen on two occasions to the anti-war views of his church's presiding bishop. He even conceded to the Rt. Rev. Edmond Browning one day before the bombing of Baghdad began that the bishop and his counterparts in mainline Protestant, Eastern Orthodox and Catholic churches had taken the "high moral ground" by opposing military action against Iraq. But Bush has launched a religious counteroffensive this week, bolstered by supportive views from evangelical leaders.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1990 | From Times News Services
Religious broadcasters suffering from falling ratings and dwindling public confidence are turning their eyes toward a new market--the Soviet Union. Two prominent television ministers, Robert Schuller and Pat Robertson, announced new Soviet ventures during the annual meeting this week of the National Religious Broadcasters, and others are clearly interested in penetrating the Soviet Bloc in the new age of openness.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1990 | From Times News Services
Religious broadcasters suffering from falling ratings and dwindling public confidence are turning their eyes toward a new market--the Soviet Union. Two prominent television ministers, Robert Schuller and Pat Robertson, announced new Soviet ventures during the annual meeting this week of the National Religious Broadcasters, and others are clearly interested in penetrating the Soviet Bloc in the new age of openness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1985 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
The newly perceived political influence of the country's evangelical/fundamentalist leadership was demonstrated dramatically at the National Religious Broadcasters' annual convention here this week. President Reagan appeared for the fourth year in a row, saying he almost "fired myself" for interrupting his work on the budget and the State of the Union Address to speak to the more than 3,000 television and radio broadcasters. Vice President George Bush and Rep. Jack Kemp (R-N.Y.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Paul Crouch Quits: The founder and president of Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network has resigned from the National Religious Broadcasters, citing "trumped-up charges" against his television ministry. Paul Crouch, who founded the religious network in 1974, was the subject of an inquiry by the NRB ethics committee, which investigated complaints about his business practices and the treatment of Trinity employees.
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