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National Resources Defense Council

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NEWS
March 12, 1989 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
Starting this week, Los Angeles schoolchildren will find something missing from their lunch plate--apples. In light of a national study that found children at an "intolerable risk" of cancer from pesticide residues on vegetables and fruit, the Los Angeles Unified School District, the nation's second largest, will not serve apples or any apple products including juice, pies and applesauce, officials said Saturday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
When an intrepid explorer joins forces with a successful contemporary art gallery, the mood for the evening could be described as “artfully adventurous.” Gagosian Gallery in Beverly Hills hosted photographer and environmental activist Sebastian Copeland on Thursday night in a fundraiser for the Natural Resources Defense Council. The British-born artist, lecturer and self-described “extreme adventurer” -- who's based in West Hollywood -- has led expeditions in remote locations around the world to document the effects of climate change and capture, through video and photography, endangered landscapes.  CHEAT SHEET: Fall arts preview Three of Copeland's 48-by-60-inch “pigment prints,” as he calls them, were on display in the airy upstairs gallery space, with 100% of the proceeds from their sales benefiting the NRDC.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
When staunch opponents of the planned San Joaquin Hills toll road gather, the collection plate is passed around to obtain $5 and $10 donations to help pay mounting legal costs. But behind the scenes is a major player underwriting much of the effort--the Homeland Foundation of Laguna Beach, run by Anne Catherine Getty, granddaughter of oil tycoon J. Paul Getty, and her husband, John Earhart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2006 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
Citing a spike in the number of beach closures in California and the nation as a wake-up call, an environmental watchdog group is expected to file a lawsuit today against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for failing to adopt tougher water quality standards to protect beachgoers from waterborne illnesses.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1990 | From Associated Press
An environmental group called on the Bush Administration Monday to participate in an international effort to phase out a commonly used chemical that is depleting the ozone layer. The Natural Resources Defense Council also urged consumers to avoid buying 141 products, ranging from artists' varnishes to hornet-killing sprays, that contain the chemical 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, have been singled out as the most potent ozone-destroying substances.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
The decision by the nation's two largest school districts to stop serving apples and apple products to students has dramatically widened a years-old controversy over the chemical daminozide, used under the trade name Alar, to make apples redder and last longer.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Arguing that the state has done little to control leaking chemical waste and other hazards at a number of Southern California landfills, the Natural Resources Defense Council on Tuesday filed a lawsuit charging the California Integrated Waste Management Board with failing to enforce laws designed to protect public health and safety.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for conservationists, state Fish and Game officials ruled Monday that a petition to list the California gnatcatcher as endangered is justified and should be set for what could be a contentious public hearing in August. The ruling came as no surprise to developers and environmentalists, who have long been at odds over how to protect the tiny songbird and its coastal sage-scrub habitat on thousands of acres of prime developable land in Orange, San Diego and Riverside counties.
NEWS
March 29, 1989 | MAURA DOLAN, Times Environmental Writer
They have been called "toxic terrorists" and "fear mongers." Their reputation as scientists has been assailed on the front pages of the nation's newspapers and their ethics and responsibility challenged. So why do they seem elated? To the authors of the report that ignited a recent furor over a chemical used on apples, the results could not be better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2004 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
Seven years ago, Laurie David was invited to a small breakfast at a Westside hotel with Robert F. Kennedy Jr., a charismatic attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council. She went in a casual conservationist who yelled at litterbugs -- and emerged a fiery environmentalist who wanted to devote her life to preserving the planet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2004 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
Seven years ago, Laurie David was invited to a small breakfast at a Westside hotel with Robert F. Kennedy Jr., a charismatic attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council. She went in a casual conservationist who yelled at litterbugs -- and emerged a fiery environmentalist who wanted to devote her life to preserving the planet.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Arguing that the state has done little to control leaking chemical waste and other hazards at a number of Southern California landfills, the Natural Resources Defense Council on Tuesday filed a lawsuit charging the California Integrated Waste Management Board with failing to enforce laws designed to protect public health and safety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
When staunch opponents of the planned San Joaquin Hills toll road gather, the collection plate is passed around to obtain $5 and $10 donations to help pay mounting legal costs. But behind the scenes is a major player underwriting much of the effort--the Homeland Foundation of Laguna Beach, run by Anne Catherine Getty, granddaughter of oil tycoon J. Paul Getty, and her husband, John Earhart.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for conservationists, state Fish and Game officials ruled Monday that a petition to list the California gnatcatcher as endangered is justified and should be set for what could be a contentious public hearing in August. The ruling came as no surprise to developers and environmentalists, who have long been at odds over how to protect the tiny songbird and its coastal sage-scrub habitat on thousands of acres of prime developable land in Orange, San Diego and Riverside counties.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1990 | From Associated Press
An environmental group called on the Bush Administration Monday to participate in an international effort to phase out a commonly used chemical that is depleting the ozone layer. The Natural Resources Defense Council also urged consumers to avoid buying 141 products, ranging from artists' varnishes to hornet-killing sprays, that contain the chemical 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, have been singled out as the most potent ozone-destroying substances.
NEWS
March 29, 1989 | MAURA DOLAN, Times Environmental Writer
They have been called "toxic terrorists" and "fear mongers." Their reputation as scientists has been assailed on the front pages of the nation's newspapers and their ethics and responsibility challenged. So why do they seem elated? To the authors of the report that ignited a recent furor over a chemical used on apples, the results could not be better.
NEWS
March 4, 1989 | CATHLEEN DECKER and LARRY STAMMER, Times Staff Writers
Heeding disturbing new warnings that the Earth's ozone layer is being destroyed at a startling pace, President Bush called Friday for a ban on use and production of ozone-depleting chemicals by the turn of the century, if safe alternatives can be developed. The President's announcement, made as Bush dispatched Environmental Protection Agency Administrator William K. Reilly to London for a world conference on the ozone layer, marked a major shift in U.S. policy.
NEWS
March 14, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL and ELAINE WOO, Times Staff Writers
Officials of school districts around the state, including San Francisco and Sacramento, said Monday that they have pulled apples and apple products from their lunch menus because of spreading concerns over children ingesting daminozide, a chemical some growers use to treat the fruit. Monday's announcements followed earlier apple bans by the nation's two largest districts--Los Angeles Unified and New York City schools.
NEWS
March 14, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL and ELAINE WOO, Times Staff Writers
Officials of school districts around the state, including San Francisco and Sacramento, said Monday that they have pulled apples and apple products from their lunch menus because of spreading concerns over children ingesting daminozide, a chemical some growers use to treat the fruit. Monday's announcements followed earlier apple bans by the nation's two largest districts--Los Angeles Unified and New York City schools.
NEWS
March 14, 1989 | MARK STEIN
Major school districts, including those in New York City, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sacramento, have quit serving apples and apple products to students because of fear over apples treated with daminozide, a growth-regulating chemical marketed mainly under the name Alar. Meanwhile, there is confusion over exactly what the chemical is, how and why it is used and what its health effects are. Here is some basic information on the chemical. Q: What is Alar?
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