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National Security Agency

NATIONAL
June 17, 2013 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
Edward Snowden may represent the archetypal leaker of the Internet age - a tech savant who justifies his civil disobedience as a righteous rebuttal to the big institutions he believes have intruded too far into ordinary people's lives. But it's not just the mole in the National Security Agency surveillance story who is operating in new channels. The reporters who brought his account forward also represent something distinct in journalism. In some cases, their profiles loom larger, particularly on the subject of security and spying, than those of their publications.
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NATIONAL
July 27, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - A reporter recently asked the National Security Agency's chief a blunt question: Why can't he come up with a better example of a terrorism plot foiled through the bulk collection of U.S. phone records? In the weeks since Edward Snowden disclosed that the NSA had been collecting and storing the calling histories of nearly every American, NSA Director Keith Alexander and other U.S. officials have cited only one case as having been discovered exclusively by searching those records: some San Diego men who sent $8,500 to Al Qaeda-linked militants in Somalia.
NEWS
April 13, 2001 | From the Baltimore Sun
Inside a large yellow warehouse within the iron gates of the National Security Agency, thousands of boxes stuffed with the nation's secrets are piled to the ceiling. For decades this place has been hidden from public view, a catacomb holding more than 15 million pages of documents filled with information about everything from the Vietnam War to President Kennedy's assassination to the Persian Gulf War. Some of the documents may never be declassified.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The National Security Agency collected samples of records showing where Americans were when they made mobile phone calls in 2010 and 2011 to test how it could obtain and process the data in bulk, but decided not to move forward with the plan, intelligence officials disclosed Wednesday. The admission by NSA chief Keith Alexander to a Senate committee solved part of a mystery about the digital spying agency's involvement with data that could reveal the day-to-day movements of - and deeply personal information about - every cellphone user.
NATIONAL
July 31, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - After weeks of mounting controversy and doubts in Congress, the Obama administration made its most detailed effort yet to reassure the public about the National Security Agency's massive collection of Americans' telephone records, releasing previously classified documents in an effort to save a program that appears increasingly endangered. But the documents, which included a secret order from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that was once so highly classified that only those with a "need to know" could see it, appeared to do little to quiet the calls in Congress to rein in the NSA's authority.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - Dianne Feinstein got out of her chair, grabbed a 54-page federal court opinion and poked her finger at the bullet points buried inside, insisting a visitor read each carefully as the busy senator watched and waited. The opinion described terrorist bombing plots - aimed at New York's subways and stock exchange and at a newspaper office in Denmark - that, according to the judge, had been foiled by the government's collection of data on billions of American phone calls.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - A federal judge has for the first time ruled that the National Security Agency's once-secret policy of collecting the dialing records of all phone calls in the country probably violates the Constitution, a defeat for the government that could alter the political debate over the controversial program and set up an eventual review by the Supreme Court. Monday's ruling will not immediately stop the NSA's massive data collection program because U.S. District Judge Richard J. Leon immediately stayed it to give the government time to appeal.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - Although U.S. intelligence officials have indicated since last summer that the National Security Agency was vacuuming up nearly every American telephone record for counter-terrorism investigations, officials acknowledged Friday that the spy agency collects data from less than a third of U.S. calls because it can't keep pace with cellphone usage. In a speech last month, President Obama called the bulk collection of telephone records the most controversial part of the debate over security and privacy sparked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden's leaks of classified material.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) offered a full-throated defense of the government's collection of data on billions of American phone calls, saying Wednesday that the National Security Agency's practices have safeguarded the nation without trampling on civil liberties. “What keeps me up at night, candidly, is another attack against the United States. And I see enough of the threat stream to know that is possible,” Feinstein said at a Pacific Council on International Policy dinner in Century City.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Journalists and bloggers who report news to the public will be protected from being forced to testify about their work under a media shield bill passed by a Senate committee Thursday. But the new legal protections will not extend to the controversial online website Wikileaks and others whose principal work involves disclosing "primary-source documents … without authorization. " Senate sponsors of the bill and a coalition of media groups that support it hailed Thursday's bipartisan Senate Judiciary Committee vote as a breakthrough.
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