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BUSINESS
May 1, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
In its first laboratory analysis of ground turkey sold at retail outlets, Consumer Reports found that more than half tested positive for fecal bacteria.  The magazine also found that most of the bacteria it found proved resistant to one or more of the antibiotics commonly used to treat them.  Some turkey-growing operations use antibiotics only to treat illnesses, but other operations give them to their animals daily, Consumer Reports said. ...
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NEWS
November 28, 1991 | Jerry Hicks and Ann Conway
SO MANY TURKEYS: OK, just how many turkeys are out there waiting for us? About 300 million were raised in the United States in 1991, the National Turkey Federation says. Guess which holiday sells the most. Did you say Thanksgiving? The federation says Americans will eat 45 million turkeys today, 23 million at Christmas. Easter comes in third, at 19 million. . . . Finally, remember that only male turkeys gobble; females make clicking sounds.
FOOD
November 24, 2011 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
To call a turkey sandwich the stuff of memories sounds far-fetched (few have waxed Proustian about a turkey club), but that's what it is to Peruvian chef Ricardo Zarate. The chef behind Los Angeles' Mo-Chica and Picca came to know and love the turkey sandwich not in his native Lima but while working at the Millennium hotel in London early on in his culinary career. The object of his craving: roasted turkey with fried sweet potatoes and jalapeno-cilantro aioli between two slices of buttery brioche.
NEWS
November 25, 1985
Diet- and health-conscious Americans have taken some of the tradition out of holiday dinners: statistics show they now gobble up less turkey during Thanksgiving and Christmas than they consume year-round. The National Turkey Federation estimates about 45 million turkeys will be eaten on Thursday, about the same number as on the last few Thanksgivings. The figure represents only 25% of the total number of turkeys consumed during the entire year.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2010 | By Nate Jackson, Los Angeles Times
Wading through a knee-high sea of wattles and beaks, Mary Pitman shouts above waves of gobbles to rattle off the names of turkey breeds on her family farm in the San Joaquin Valley. She points out the Narragansett, the white Holland and the standard bronze ? birds that Americans have eaten since the days of the founding fathers. Pitman Family Farms ? which produces the Mary's Free Range Turkey brand ? sold out of Thanksgiving birds several months ago. The flock percolating around Pitman is reserved for Christmas.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
By long-standing tradition, the centerpiece of Thanksgiving dinner has been purchased rock-hard, frozen and cheap. That's starting to change. Turkeys are going Godiva. The same passion for eating that brought us gourmet food trucks and swelled ratings for TV cooking shows has boosted demand for top-drawer turkeys with fancy names and even fancier price tags — up to $150 for a prized Bourbon Red heritage variety. "People want a bird that has a name, a provenance, a pedigree — a bird you can brag about," said Kathy Gori, a 60-year-old screenwriter who splits her time between Sonoma and Santa Monica.
FOOD
June 9, 1994
Perhaps you didn't know June is Turkey-Lover's Month. So says the National Turkey Federation, which is putting its money where its mouth is with a turkey recipe contest. The winner (recipe must use at least one pound of turkey meat) gets $2,500; for more information, write to the federation at 11319 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, Va. 22090. Deadline is July 30, so you actually get to work on your recipe a little during July, which is possibly Ahi Tuna-Lover's Month.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
In its first laboratory analysis of ground turkey sold at retail outlets, Consumer Reports found that more than half tested positive for fecal bacteria.  The magazine also found that most of the bacteria it found proved resistant to one or more of the antibiotics commonly used to treat them.  Some turkey-growing operations use antibiotics only to treat illnesses, but other operations give them to their animals daily, Consumer Reports said. ...
NATIONAL
November 26, 2009 | By Alexander C. Hart
One turkey will have plenty to be thankful for this Thanksgiving when he is gobbling about rather than being gobbled up. He owes his good fortune to President Obama -- and daughters, Malia, 11, and Sasha, 8. On Wednesday morning, Obama continued the tradition of pardoning a turkey by granting this year's lucky bird, named Courage, a reprieve from the dinner table. "I am pleased to announce that thanks to the interventions of Malia and Sasha . . . Courage will also be spared this terrible and delicious fate," announced Obama, the two girls standing by his side.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
By long-standing tradition, the centerpiece of Thanksgiving dinner has been purchased rock-hard, frozen and cheap. That's starting to change. Turkeys are going Godiva. The same passion for eating that brought us gourmet food trucks and swelled ratings for TV cooking shows has boosted demand for top-drawer turkeys with fancy names and even fancier price tags — up to $150 for a prized Bourbon Red heritage variety. "People want a bird that has a name, a provenance, a pedigree — a bird you can brag about," said Kathy Gori, a 60-year-old screenwriter who splits her time between Sonoma and Santa Monica.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2010 | By Nate Jackson, Los Angeles Times
Wading through a knee-high sea of wattles and beaks, Mary Pitman shouts above waves of gobbles to rattle off the names of turkey breeds on her family farm in the San Joaquin Valley. She points out the Narragansett, the white Holland and the standard bronze ? birds that Americans have eaten since the days of the founding fathers. Pitman Family Farms ? which produces the Mary's Free Range Turkey brand ? sold out of Thanksgiving birds several months ago. The flock percolating around Pitman is reserved for Christmas.
NATIONAL
November 26, 2009 | By Alexander C. Hart
One turkey will have plenty to be thankful for this Thanksgiving when he is gobbling about rather than being gobbled up. He owes his good fortune to President Obama -- and daughters, Malia, 11, and Sasha, 8. On Wednesday morning, Obama continued the tradition of pardoning a turkey by granting this year's lucky bird, named Courage, a reprieve from the dinner table. "I am pleased to announce that thanks to the interventions of Malia and Sasha . . . Courage will also be spared this terrible and delicious fate," announced Obama, the two girls standing by his side.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2005 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Every November, the president of the United States is presented with the National Thanksgiving Turkey -- and promptly issues it a formal pardon. But unlike the turkeys granted reprieves from the chopping block over the last 15 years, this year's bird will not be sent to Frying Pan Park, an animal farm in the Washington suburbs, to gobble to its heart's content for the rest of its days.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1994 | Researched by ADAM S. BAUMAN / Los Angeles Times
Today's propensity for overeating might actually seem economical when you consider you that can feed 10 people for $28. According to the American Farm Bureau Federation, that's the average cost for a Thanksgiving meal of turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes, rolls, peas, cranberries and a dessert. But how much you pay depends upon where you live. This year, according to the federation's annual survey, prices per pound of turkey have ranged from 19 cents to $1.34.
FOOD
June 9, 1994
Perhaps you didn't know June is Turkey-Lover's Month. So says the National Turkey Federation, which is putting its money where its mouth is with a turkey recipe contest. The winner (recipe must use at least one pound of turkey meat) gets $2,500; for more information, write to the federation at 11319 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, Va. 22090. Deadline is July 30, so you actually get to work on your recipe a little during July, which is possibly Ahi Tuna-Lover's Month.
FOOD
September 1, 1988 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Question: My question concerns all of the new turkey products that are on the market. I am concerned about cholesterol and fat in our diets and have switched to turkey ham, turkey sausage and turkey pastrami. Am I only fooling myself that we are getting less fat and cholesterol? Answer: Yes and no. According to the National Turkey Federation, "Turkey deli meats are made from the cured meat of the lean turkey thigh without adding extra fats.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1994 | Researched by ADAM S. BAUMAN / Los Angeles Times
Today's propensity for overeating might actually seem economical when you consider you that can feed 10 people for $28. According to the American Farm Bureau Federation, that's the average cost for a Thanksgiving meal of turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes, rolls, peas, cranberries and a dessert. But how much you pay depends upon where you live. This year, according to the federation's annual survey, prices per pound of turkey have ranged from 19 cents to $1.34.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | Jerry Hicks and Ann Conway
SO MANY TURKEYS: OK, just how many turkeys are out there waiting for us? About 300 million were raised in the United States in 1991, the National Turkey Federation says. Guess which holiday sells the most. Did you say Thanksgiving? The federation says Americans will eat 45 million turkeys today, 23 million at Christmas. Easter comes in third, at 19 million. . . . Finally, remember that only male turkeys gobble; females make clicking sounds.
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