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National Turkey Federation

NEWS
November 25, 1993 | BETTIJANE LEVINE and GAILE ROBINSON
1 Get your gobbler from a turkey farm, complete with feathers. Save all the fluffy stuff, dye it dynamite colors and use it to decorate your kids' costumes, stuff pillows, make feather boas. 2 A turkey carcass makes great sculpture. To turn your bird into yard art: boil all remaining meat off the bone, allow carcass to dry, paint with clear varnish and "plant" the skeletal sculpture in your cactus patch amid sand. 3 Turn the wishbone into haute decor: gild it with gold paint.
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BUSINESS
November 23, 1994 | VIVIAN MARINO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Let's talk turkey for a moment, shall we? Some folks are doing a little belt-tightening when it comes to shopping for this year's Thanksgiving dinner. Others have plenty of room to spare. With the inflation rate holding steady nationwide, the cost of this year's holiday feast depends simply on where you live and where you shop.
FOOD
November 17, 1999 | JENNIFER LOWE, DEPUTY FOOD EDITOR
Fresh or frozen? Free-range or organic? Basted or not? There are enough debates at the Thanksgiving table without throwing the turkey into it. So, while barbecues were firing up for summer, the Times Test Kitchen started testing turkeys. Fresh turkeys. Frozen turkeys. Free-range and organic turkeys. Supermarket brands, national brands, small specialty brands. In all, we roasted more than 20 birds over four months, each time using the same basic recipe. What makes a good turkey? It depends.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2001 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With more people expected to stay home this Thanksgiving, supermarkets are gearing up for an economic feast, stocking more sweet potatoes, pumpkin pies and bigger birds too. But that also means consumers will see fewer free turkeys and steep discounts. With strong sales projected, supermarkets are not feeling compelled to offer the same huge discounts on turkey and other items that they did in years past, farm economists said.
NEWS
November 26, 1985 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--President Reagan met Wilfred the Tom Turkey and a gathering of reporters in the Rose Garden, and it was Wilfred who had the last word. The President fended off questions dealing with substantive issues and said: "The only questions I will take today are about the turkey." Wilfred gobbled loudly, evoking laughter. "I agree with everything you've said," Reagan said solemnly. Wilfred, a 55-pound gift from the National Turkey Federation, is on his way to the Evans Farm in Vienna, Va.
FOOD
April 16, 1987 | TOM SIETSEMA, The Washington Post
Turkey, hailed as the "great American bird" and a hallowed holiday tradition, appears to be going mainstream. Many cooks will serve turkey for their Easter dinner this year. Thirty years ago, 90% of all turkey was purchased in November and December. Today, 60% is bought in the first 10 months of the year. According to the National Turkey Federation, Americans ate an estimated 13.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2009 | By Victoria Kim
The millions of turkeys headed to the slaughterhouse and into the oven this Thanksgiving will receive no additional reprieve from the law. FOR THE RECORD: A subheadline on an earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that a federal appeals panel ruled that the Humane Society had no grounds to sue the USDA for asserting that a 1958 congressional act mandating humane slaughter does not extend to poultry. The appeals panel said the society has no standing to sue. Ruling on a four-year legal battle over the regulation of poultry slaughter, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals last week threw out a lawsuit challenging the government's position that a half-century-old congressional act on humane slaughter does not extend to animals of the feathered kind.
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