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NATIONAL
September 25, 2012 | By Danielle Ryan, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The giant panda cub that died over the weekend had liver irregularities and fluid in its abdomen, National Zoo officials said Monday, but it was unclear whether that contributed to its sudden demise. The zoo's chief veterinarian, Suzan Murray, said the cub's heart and lungs appeared normal based on preliminary findings of a necropsy - equivalent to a human autopsy. Test results are expected within a week to help identify the cause of death. Zookeepers referred to the cub as "she" during a news conference because it appeared to be female, but they won't know conclusively until lab tests are completed.
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NEWS
July 25, 1988 | United Press International
Ling-Ling, the aging giant panda whose 16-year stay at the National Zoo has been marked by four pregnancies but no surviving cub, is thought to be pregnant again and could give birth within three weeks, a zoo spokesman said Sunday. Zoo spokesman Thai Rubin said Ling-Ling's urine has shown hormonal changes indicative of pregnancy since she and longtime companion Hsing-Hsing mated in early April. But panda specialists at the zoo have stopped testing Ling-Ling to reduce disruptions to her routine.
NATIONAL
August 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A trio of Sumatran tiger cubs born at the National Zoo played with each other and explored their habitat during their introduction to the public. The three 14-week-old male cubs -- Marah, Jalan and Besar -- chased after their mother, Soyono, and occasionally belted out baby roars which sounded more like screeches.
NATIONAL
October 3, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The National Zoo's only white tiger was euthanized. Zoo officials said 18-year-old Taj had been treated for osteoarthritis for several years and recently was having trouble walking. He was in such pain this week that it was decided to euthanize him. Taj was born at the Henry Doorly Zoo in Omaha in 1984 and was brought to Washington two years later. He never had any offspring.
NEWS
May 14, 1986 | United Press International
Israel will give the National Zoo an adult male fennec fox on Friday, the first of seven exotic animals it will send to the United States. The seven animals are being sent to the zoo by the Hai-Bar Society of Israel, recipient of a similar gift from the Smithsonian Institution in the 1970s. Michael Robinson, director of the National Zoo, said the arrival of the fox is a fine example of global cooperation to save exotic animals.
NATIONAL
July 11, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The National Zoo's first panda cub in 16 years survived its initial 24 hours -- a benchmark for pandas born in captivity -- and continued to emit such a robust squeal that zoo officials were optimistic about the days ahead. The cub and its mother, Mei Xiang, will remain in a den for the next three months, segregated from her mate, Tian Tian, as well as visitors to the zoo. The cub, whose gender is yet unknown, has yet to be named.
NATIONAL
May 7, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The National Zoo said it had to euthanize a monkey of a critically endangered species. A 35-year-old female -- elderly in monkey years -- had been suffering from a spinal condition and was not responding to treatment, zoo officials said. Veterinarians agreed the primate's quality of life had deteriorated. The Sulawesi macaque was part of what the zoo says is a critically endangered species, native to the Indonesian island of Sulawesi.
NEWS
April 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
National Zoo officials in Washington, D.C., have signed an agreement with the Chinese government to pay $10 million to bring a pair of young pandas to Washington for 10 years. The zoo is counting on the District of Columbia to help underwrite the transaction. Mayor Anthony A. Williams said in a letter to Smithsonian Secretary Lawrence M. Small that he will seek to contribute $1 million. The pandas would be younger than 6, with any offspring belonging to China.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
One of the National Zoo's two camels has been euthanized because of concerns that the animal's quality of life had deteriorated, a zoo spokeswoman said. Camille, a 17-year-old Bactrian camel, was put down in her stall shortly after daybreak as keepers, veterinarians and curators looked on, zoo spokeswoman Peper Long said. Zoo records show that the camel had been unable to walk or stand at times and that the animal had been heavily medicated for at least two years.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Officials do not think there will be a pregnant panda this year at the National Zoo. "It looks as though Tian Tian and Mei Xiang did not breed this year," said assistant curator Lisa Stevens. According to zoo officials, the pair had tried to mate several times since Friday. By late Sunday, zoo officials believed Mei Xiang was no longer in heat. Pandas come into heat only once a year, and the female is receptive to her male companion's advances for only two or three days.
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