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Native Americans

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2014 | By Anthony Clark Carpio
A state coastal agency could soon decide whether Huntington Beach can rezone a site in the Bolsa Chica mesa, an area that opponents say is home to Native American artifacts and remains, to allow for a housing development. The California Coastal Commission is set to vote Wednesday on whether the city can amend its Local Coastal Program - local governments' guide to development in the coastal zone - to allow for new homes on the northwest portion of Bolsa Chica. In a report, commission staff recommends denying amendments because the changes would "eliminate a higher priority land use designation and does not assure that significant culture resources and sensitive habitats will be protected" under the California Coastal Act. The move would also violate a part of the Local Coastal Program that the commission has already approved.
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NATIONAL
December 22, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
They were two veteran emissaries for a Los Angeles-based philanthropy, tasked with staging a clandestine operation to rescue a series of Native American spiritual artifacts from public sale half a world away. This month, Annenberg Foundation staffers Allison Gister and Carol Laumen found themselves making anonymous telephone bids at a Paris auction to secure rarities considered sacred by the Hopi and San Carlos Apache tribes in Arizona, including exotic mask-like visages that had been lost - some say looted - over the last century.
SCIENCE
December 18, 2013 | By Monte Morin
A 50,000-year-old toe bone found in a Siberian cave is giving scientists a surprising view of the breeding habits of early humans. In what has been described as a “Lord of the Rings”-type world, researchers say that Homo sapiens , Neanderthals and two other groups of early humans mingled and interbred thousands of years before all species but ours became extinct. The findings were presented Wednesday in the journal Nature by a team of scientists who sequenced the DNA from the Neanderthal toe fossil and compared it to the genomes of 25 present-day humans, as well as the genome of a sister group to Neanderthals called Denisovans.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
There's always a last minute when Christmas creeps up on us. Here are six terrific sets of classical CDs or DVDs that are possibilities for the tardy shopper and for anyone wanting to leave 2013 in the right spirit and prepare for a sustenance-filled new year. "Selected Signs III-VIII": This strange title for an arty white box holding six CDs of sophisticated selections is taken from an exhibition in Munich, Germany. Musically, it consists of a compilation of selections from the ECM label that are heavily weighted toward spiritual Eastern European minimalism and spiritually minimalist Western jazz as an aural environment continuing hour after enthralling hour.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Inkoo Kang
There's something dispiritingly familiar about "Dancing on a Dry Salt Lake," writer-director-star Dominique De Fazio's tale of a white man's journey into Native American mysticism. De Fazio plays Warner, a 40-something astronomer who heads out to the Californian desert after his live-in girlfriend dumps him for being too selfish. Warner crashes his car on the outskirts of San Bernardino County and ends up in a small community of European expats, among whom he develops a whole new personality (as a result of inconsistent writing, not as plot development)
SPORTS
December 15, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Should NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and team owner Daniel Snyder agree with Native American activists that the logo and nickname of the Washington Redskins is racist and needs to be changed, they would be following a well-worn path. Since 1970, more than 600 colleges and high schools -- as well as the state of Oregon and the Los Angeles Unified School District -- have done away with Native American nicknames and mascots. NOTABLE COLLEGES Stanford: From Indians to Cardinal in 1972.
SPORTS
December 15, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
The best sports nicknames connote power, speed, bravery and even whimsy. But many fans say they see something else in some of the country's most popular team names and mascots - racism. The Oneida Indian Nation is pressuring the NFL and Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder to change that team's name and logo, which many Native Americans say is offensive. And thousands of baseball fans have signed an online petition asking the Cleveland Indians to retire Chief Wahoo, the team's smiling, red-faced caricature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2013 | By Scott Gold
SANTA YNEZ, Calif. - The Chumash Indians, first seen by explorers along the California coast in the fall of 1542, did not have running water on their tiny, sickle-shaped reservation until the 1960s. Over time, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians clawed its way to sustainability, and more. The tribe harnessed Depression-era laws of self-governance, state and federal gambling initiatives. A casino opened in 2003. Healthcare is paid for. The tribe foots the bill for any recognized descendant who wants to go to college.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Karl Lagerfeld is raising eyebrows among some critics for using feathered headdresses and warpaint-like golden makeup during Chanel's "Metier d'Art" show in Dallas on Tuesday. He also drew on other Western stereotypes -- cowboys, ranchers -- but the use of Native American stereotypes in fashion has been controversial. [The Cut] Actress Gwyneth Paltrow and fitness guru Tracy Anderson, who recently launched a web series together called "The Restart Project," are developing a television series on love and weight loss, Anderson says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
The 17-year-old high school senior lives in a neighborhood south of downtown where crime is still high, police sirens are ever-present, and fast-food joints line the block. She rarely leaves the area, never once having been to the beach with her family. But Maria Castro escaped her surroundings last summer and learned new ways to be healthy - physically and mentally. She did yoga and went to a beach in Santa Monica. She cooked organic food for war veterans in Escondido, connecting with their stories of violence and stress.
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