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OPINION
December 30, 1990 | Richard Rodriguez, Richard Rodriguez, author of "Hunger of Memory" (Bantam), is a journalist at Pacific News Service. His book about California, "Mexico's Children," will be published in 1991 by Viking
Mexican kids stand on Sunset Boulevard in Beverly Hills beside sandwich boards advertising "STAR MAPS." They stare patiently toward private horizons as cars whiz past them. There are two futures in California. There is the glamorous, the famous, the gaudy telling of time in California as possibility. There is also a tragic way of telling the future in California as limitation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
In a Glendale public school classroom, the immigrant's daughter uses no English as she conjugates verbs and writes sentences about cats. More than a decade after California voters eliminated most bilingual programs, first-grader Sofia Checchi is taught in Italian nearly all day — as she and her 20 classmates at Franklin Elementary School have been since kindergarten. Yet in just a year, Sofia has jumped a grade level in reading English. In the view of her mother — an Italian immigrant — Sofia's achievement validates a growing body of research indicating that learning to read in students' primary languages helps them become more fluent in English.
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SPORTS
August 1, 1992
In the article about Andre Agassi (July 6), it states, "Agassi (won at) Wimbledon, the first American to do so since John McEnroe in 1984." Have you heard of Martina Navratilova? The remark reeks of sexism and subtly posits that native-born citizens are somehow more authentic than foreign-born naturalized citizens. Perhaps more importantly, it's inaccurate. The truth would read, "the first native-born citizen of the United States to win the mens' singles title since John McEnroe in 1984."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2010 | By Teresa Watanabe and Hector Becerra
California has long been the ultimate melting pot, with the majority of its population coming from outside the state. Dust Bowl emigres, Asian railroad workers, high-tech entrepreneurs, Mexican laborers and war refugees from around the globe flocked to California. The majority migrant population filled the state's myriad labor needs, challenged the schools with a cacophony of new languages and roiled its politics with immigration debates. But, in a dramatic demographic shift, California's narrative as the nation's quintessential immigrant state is giving way to a new reality.
NEWS
November 8, 1987
I think that Johanne E. M. Zell neglected an essential point in her letter. In World War II, the Japanese imprisoned foreigners like herself. We imprisoned American citizens. Many of them were native-born American citizens. Her analogy is totally false. WALTER D. DOUGLAS Colton
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1986
I write to support The Times' editorial position opposing Proposition 63. You rightly point out that the initiative is "unnecessary and trouble-causing" as well as "insulting and demeaning to the thousands of foreigners and immigrants who live in California." As a native-born American, I find Proposition 63 equally insulting and demeaning to those of us who are proud of our country's heritage of diversity. VILMA S. MARTINEZ Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1987
Many native-born American concert pianists would give anything for the publicity that William J. Eaton gave pianist Vladimir Feltsman of Moscow ("After 8 Years, Emigration Is Music to His Ears," Aug. 6). Feltsman had not even arrived in the United States but he was already guaranteed a university teaching position, plenty of money and concert tours. American pianists should be so lucky! Eaton's article states that Feltsman will be earning more money in a year of teaching than he did in 20 years as a performer in the U.S.S.
NEWS
July 10, 1986
It is time for a moratorium on intolerance in Monterey Park. We have a great city, with even greater people who are all in their own ways trying to make this a better place to live. We can't continue to progress toward excellence in living if we are to become polarized in perception or in fact as it relates to ethnic groups. The Asians in our community have every right to be here and to prosper in the "American Dream." Native-born Americans, themselves descendants of the immigrants of the world, can no longer continue to feel that they are somehow the chosen ones, entitled to special status because of their birthright.
OPINION
May 23, 2006
The May 18 article, "A Job Americans Won't Do, Even at $34 an Hour," only proves that the U.S. is large and diverse enough to supply anecdotes supporting every position under the sun. The article concludes that Americans consider hard manual labor beneath them because $34-an-hour landscaping jobs go unfilled at a single company in Orange County, which reportedly has the lowest unemployment rate of any county in California and a high cost of living....
BUSINESS
March 15, 2010 | By Alejandro Lazo
Recently arrived immigrants flocked to smaller metropolitan areas during the first half of the last decade, lured by less competition for jobs and cheaper housing, but they were not as likely to buy homes in such places, according to a study expected to be released Monday. The population of immigrants living in the U.S. for a decade or less jumped 27% in cities such as Nashville, El Paso, Bakersfield and Stockton during the first five years of the century, the USC Lusk Center for Real Estate reported.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2010 | By Alejandro Lazo
Recently arrived immigrants flocked to smaller metropolitan areas during the first half of the last decade, lured by less competition for jobs and cheaper housing, but they were not as likely to buy homes in such places, according to a study expected to be released Monday. The population of immigrants living in the U.S. for a decade or less jumped 27% in cities such as Nashville, El Paso, Bakersfield and Stockton during the first five years of the century, the USC Lusk Center for Real Estate reported.
OPINION
October 12, 2009 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ
It's not unusual for a global city to recruit an international talent like Gustavo Dudamel to conduct its symphony orchestra. (Alan Gilbert, the new conductor of the New York Philharmonic, is the first native New Yorker to hold the post since the institution was founded in 1842.) What is unusual is how the Los Angeles orchestra is using the high-culture, Venezuelan-born wunderkind to build a rapport with this city's native-born Latino masses. Gauging from the widespread, deliriously upbeat hoopla -- and taking into account Dudamel's exceptional qualities and charisma -- maybe it'll even work.
OPINION
June 25, 2007
Re "Demographics and the golden door," Opinion, June 19 Richard Alba writes that changing our admission criteria for immigrants to favor those with education and skills would torpedo a historic opportunity for native-born minorities to advance into desirable occupations. It's a fair point, but Alba doesn't seem to realize that his argument is more general: Our current mass immigration of lower-skilled workers, admitted under family reunification, also degrades the employment prospects for minorities.
OPINION
May 23, 2006
The May 18 article, "A Job Americans Won't Do, Even at $34 an Hour," only proves that the U.S. is large and diverse enough to supply anecdotes supporting every position under the sun. The article concludes that Americans consider hard manual labor beneath them because $34-an-hour landscaping jobs go unfilled at a single company in Orange County, which reportedly has the lowest unemployment rate of any county in California and a high cost of living....
OPINION
February 22, 2004 | Andrew M. Sum and Paul E. Harrington, Andrew M. Sum is director and Paul E. Harrington is associate director of the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University in Boston.
If you scrutinize the U.S. labor market numbers from the last two years of economic recovery, you're left with what seems to be a paradox. Since the recession's low point, in November 2001, the number of employed people 16 and older has risen, but the number of jobs on the formal payrolls of employers remains below recessionary levels. The different numbers have conveniently provided politicians with a choice, depending on which points they wanted to make, but they've perplexed economists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Samuel Carter, 83, Jamaica's first native-born Roman Catholic archbishop, whose outspoken advocacy for the poor won him praise throughout the Caribbean, died Tuesday after a brief illness at a hospital in Kingston. Carter was ordained head of the Archdiocese of Kingston in 1970, a post he held for nearly 25 years.
OPINION
June 25, 2007
Re "Demographics and the golden door," Opinion, June 19 Richard Alba writes that changing our admission criteria for immigrants to favor those with education and skills would torpedo a historic opportunity for native-born minorities to advance into desirable occupations. It's a fair point, but Alba doesn't seem to realize that his argument is more general: Our current mass immigration of lower-skilled workers, admitted under family reunification, also degrades the employment prospects for minorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1998
Letters in The Times (Sept. 26) from J. Edwin Rogers and Douglas Miller underscore the problem many Americans have in understanding immigrants. First, since immigrants first arrived in this country they have most often preferred using their own language, especially if they arrived as adults. Many have preferred, if not insisted, that their children speak that language in the home, while encouraging them to learn English as the children move into the larger society. Second, the INS test for citizenship does include questions in English but the test has never required fluency in English.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1998
Letters in The Times (Sept. 26) from J. Edwin Rogers and Douglas Miller underscore the problem many Americans have in understanding immigrants. First, since immigrants first arrived in this country they have most often preferred using their own language, especially if they arrived as adults. Many have preferred, if not insisted, that their children speak that language in the home, while encouraging them to learn English as the children move into the larger society. Second, the INS test for citizenship does include questions in English but the test has never required fluency in English.
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