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MAGAZINE
June 27, 1993 | Meredith Vezina
Outdoors it is quiet--the way a suburban neighborhood can be only when the kids are in school. In a modest, wood-framed Escondido home, a woman is speaking what sounds like a foreign language, one full of clicks and softly tongued words. But it is native to the area--Native American. The woman is Villiana C. Hyde, 90, and the language is Luiseno, spoken by no more than 30 of the 3,000 remaining Luiseno people.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2013 | By Marcia Adair
"Celluloid condoms between the audience and the immediate gratification of understanding. " "More like watching Playboy TV than having sex. " Hyperbolic outbursts are not uncommon in opera, but rarely were they so concentrated or, um, vivid. FOR THE RECORD: Opera supertitles: A May 19 article about the history of opera supertitles misidentified director Graham Vick as Graham Vickers. - What riled opera so? Supertitles. Translations usually projected above the stage have driven directors to issue bomb threats.
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BOOKS
October 13, 1991 | Jack Viertel, Viertel spent seven years as a theater critic in Los Angeles; he is now creative director of Jujamcyn Theaters, which owns five Broadway theaters
Apparently, there are only two blue-tongued mango voles (rat-like members of the rodent family) left on the face of the earth, and in the opening pages of "Native Tongue" one of them is unceremoniously heaved out the window of a speeding blue pickup truck on a highway running between the mainland and the Florida Keys.
NEWS
August 3, 2008 | Dennis Wagner, The Arizona Republic
Several dozen children stand atop a bluff in Hualapai Mountain Park to face the morning sun as it peeks over a distant ridge. "Nyims thava hmado we'e," they chant, meaning "Boys greet the morning sun." And then for girls: "Nyima thava masi:yo we'e." Jorigine Bender, the teacher, urges them to repeat the dawn greeting with raised hands. "Everybody, turn toward your brother, the sun." The youths, Hualapai and Yavapai, recite the phrases in self-conscious, uncertain unison. The language is Pai, passed down through generations but unintelligible to the children.
TRAVEL
October 16, 2005 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
IT was about the time my Italian teacher was explaining exceptions to the exceptions to the rule on article and adjective modifiers for possessive nouns that I uttered the only Italian phrase that came easily after studying the language for a week. "Come mai?" Roughly translated, that means, "But why?" I said it with a long, despairing, quasi-operatic moan that made my teacher stop, surprised.
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Nora Dauenhauer was a young girl nearly half a century ago, she made the mistake one day of speaking in her native tongue. As a Tlingit Indian, she had been warned by her teachers not to use the language that had served her people in southeast Alaska for hundreds of years. When she slipped, retribution was quick and to the point. "They washed my mouth out with soap," she said as she discussed the social attitudes that have doomed her language.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1990 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born in a refugee's basement, a desktop publishing operation in the Orange County community of Los Alamitos has become the largest purveyor of Vietnamese-language books outside Vietnam.
SPORTS
June 18, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Like many Europeans, midfielder Dragan Stojkovic of Yugoslavia speaks several languages (and unlike many English hooligans, who have trouble with their native tongue). But his array of languages includes one surprise: Japanese. Stojkovic played in Japan for three seasons in Nagoya.
SPORTS
September 6, 1989
Services for former Socker Kaz Deyna, who died in an automobile accident Friday, will be Saturday at noon at the Carmelite Monastery, 5158 Hawley Blvd. in Normal Heights. The service will be conducted in Polish, Deyna's native tongue, and English. It will be open to the public. FOOTBALL Sophomore defensive ends Mark Hyatt (6-feet-4, 235 pounds) and Steve Matuszewicz (6-feet-4, 215) will not be red-shirted this season as planned, San Diego State football Coach Al Luginbill said.
OPINION
July 26, 2006
Re "To Know You Is to Love You," Column One, July 24 I find especially amusing K. Connie Kang's fascination with the English pronoun "you." For all of its alleged simplicity in comparison to the same grammatical concept in Korean, English speakers have been striving to create regional substitutes such as "youse," "y'all," "ye" and "yiz" to replace the second person plural now sadly lost but sorely needed for centuries. That absence is an Achilles' heel to our native tongue.
NEWS
March 23, 2008 | Edward Harris, Associated Press
In Nigeria, people felicitate the successful, police open cans of worms on cutlass-brandishing miscreants, and the criminal rascals meet their Waterloo. Touts, urchins and heaps of calumny: Nigerian English melds Victorian-era vocabulary inherited from long-gone British colonialists with the grammatical structures and syntax that underpin indigenous languages in Africa's most populous nation. The results can be ornate, oddly understated or remarkably apt. But in a rapidly globalizing world, some worry that Nigerians will be handicapped by an English that differs from the language of board rooms and Internet bulletin boards.
WORLD
January 17, 2007 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Few cities have been as successful as this one in parlaying a knowledge of English into an economic boom. Every day, an army of call-center workers chirps, "Can I help you?" in lilting Indian tones to thousands of customer-service callers half a world away. In other gleaming high-rises, legions of software engineers toil at their computers designing programs for clients in the United States, Britain and Canada.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2006 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
Performing Jean Racine's "Phaedra" in English is like trying to make champagne in New Jersey. It's not a matter of Gallic snobbery. The conditions are all wrong. The play poses formidable translation challenges. The formal elegance of Racine's rhymed verse is more than decoration; it's a worldview. Phaedra is a character who's torn between her passion for her stepson Hippolytus and her proud nobility. The conflict unfolds in the tragedy's verbal patterns.
OPINION
July 26, 2006
Re "To Know You Is to Love You," Column One, July 24 I find especially amusing K. Connie Kang's fascination with the English pronoun "you." For all of its alleged simplicity in comparison to the same grammatical concept in Korean, English speakers have been striving to create regional substitutes such as "youse," "y'all," "ye" and "yiz" to replace the second person plural now sadly lost but sorely needed for centuries. That absence is an Achilles' heel to our native tongue.
TRAVEL
October 16, 2005 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
IT was about the time my Italian teacher was explaining exceptions to the exceptions to the rule on article and adjective modifiers for possessive nouns that I uttered the only Italian phrase that came easily after studying the language for a week. "Come mai?" Roughly translated, that means, "But why?" I said it with a long, despairing, quasi-operatic moan that made my teacher stop, surprised.
NEWS
November 9, 2003 | Jenny Burns, Associated Press Writer
The kindergarten teacher speaks to her class in Cherokee, telling the children to pull out their mats for nap time. Using their Cherokee names, she instructs "Yo-na," or Bear, to place his mat away from "A-wi," or Deer. Soft Cherokee music lulls them to sleep. These youngsters' parents were mocked for speaking Cherokee. Their grandparents were punished. But Cherokee is the only language these children will speak in their classroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1995
Regarding the Multicultural Manners, "Why Expect a Latina to Speak Spanish?" (March 3): I'm a third-generation Californian of Mexican descent who didn't have the pleasure of learning Spanish at a young age. I took a year (of Spanish) in high school for the (language) requirement. As an adult, I saw the stereotyping as others asked if I spoke Spanish. In return, I would ask them, "Do you speak your native tongue?" Ninety-nine percent of the time they answered no. I'd reply, "Then why do you expect me to know my native tongue when it wasn't taught to me?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2003 | David Haldane, Times Staff Writer
Therese Lynn is sensitive to the presence of those who may not understand. "Who here doesn't speak French?" she asks. A few hands shoot into the air. "Do you understand French?" she wonders. Unanimous head-shaking by those who raised their hands tells her absolutely not. But Lynn's sensitivity goes only so far. She proceeds with the meeting. Entirely in French. This is the monthly gathering of Alliance Francaise de la Riviera Californienne, Orange County's own French club.
WORLD
January 30, 2003 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
ERGANI, Turkey -- Berdan Acun remembers the icy tone of the birth registrar's question a year ago. "Hejar Pola? What kind of name is that?" "It's Kurdish," said Acun, cradling his newborn. Hejar means "innocent," he explained proudly, and Pola means "steel." "My son, like me, shall have a Kurdish name." "We cannot register such a name," said the clerk, a Turkish woman Acun had known for years. "We have new instructions." Acun was stunned. The war was supposed to be over.
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