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April 2, 2009 | Andrew J. Bacevich, Andrew J. Bacevich is a professor of history and international relations at Boston University. The paperback edition of his book, "The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism," comes out in April.
When he visits Strasbourg, France, this week to participate in festivities marking NATO's 60th anniversary, President Obama should deliver a valedictory address, announcing his intention to withdraw the United States from the alliance. The U.S. has done its job. It's time for Europe to assume full responsibility for its own security, freeing the U.S. to attend to more urgent priorities.
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WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - Five NATO troops died Saturday in a helicopter crash in southern Afghanistan in the deadliest incident so far this year for the international forces, officials said. The U.S.-led NATO coalition said it was investigating the incident and did not offer additional details. A secretary for Kandahar's police chief said that the helicopter was British and that five British soldiers were killed. There were no enemy activities in the area and the crash was believed to have been caused by mechanical problems, said the secretary, Esmatullah, who goes by one name.
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WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
MUMBAI, India - Five NATO troops died in a helicopter crash in southern Afghanistan on Saturday in the deadliest incident so far this year for the international forces, officials said. The U.S.-led NATO coalition said it was investigating the incident and did not offer additional details. The nationalities of the soldiers weren't released. “Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family and friends affected by this tragic event,” the coalition said in a statement. Deaths among international troops have declined sharply in Afghanistan as NATO transfers security responsibilities to Afghan soldiers and police and prepares to withdraw most of its forces by the end of the year.
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
MUMBAI, India - Five NATO troops died in a helicopter crash in southern Afghanistan on Saturday in the deadliest incident so far this year for the international forces, officials said. The U.S.-led NATO coalition said it was investigating the incident and did not offer additional details. The nationalities of the soldiers weren't released. “Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family and friends affected by this tragic event,” the coalition said in a statement. Deaths among international troops have declined sharply in Afghanistan as NATO transfers security responsibilities to Afghan soldiers and police and prepares to withdraw most of its forces by the end of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1999
Let's tell it like it is: Americans and NATO are involved in ethnic cleansing. I would like to see Slobodan Milosevic go--and quickly. However, two wrongs do not make a right, and right now NATO and the KLA are conducting a reverse ethnic cleansing campaign against the Kosovo Serbs (33,000 have already been kicked out). The idea of NATO and the KLA making up a United Nations peacekeeping force is an oxymoron. I have even heard that NATO intends to turn the KLA into a police force. The only hope the Kosovo Serbs have is that Russians or maybe the U.N. do something.
WORLD
June 18, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Mark Magnier, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details
KABUL, Afghanistan -- An hour before NATO transferred formal responsibility for the nation's security to Afghan forces, a large bomb targeting a minority lawmaker exploded in western Kabul on Tuesday morning, killing three civilians and wounding more than a dozen others, police said. The intended target, Mohammad Mohaqiq, a prominent lawmaker and former Cabinet member from the minority Hazara community, survived the attack but at least four bodyguards in his convoy were wounded, said Gen. Mohammad Daud Amin, Kabul's deputy police chief.
WORLD
June 19, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
An apartment building in the middle of a densely populated Tripoli neighborhood was obliterated early Sunday, and Libyan officials blamed the explosion on a bombing raid by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Several witnesses among the angry crowd gathered outside the semi-collapsed building said they heard aircraft before the post-midnight blast. The blast occurred in the Arada Street neighborhood of the Souk Juma district, a sprawling community that is one of Tripoli's most populous.
WORLD
May 19, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
NATO's top official said Thursday that the air campaign in Libya had seriously damaged Moammar Kadafi's ability to fight and that continued military and political pressure would "eventually lead to the collapse" of the North African strongman's regime. But two months into its aerial campaign, there are signs of impatience within the alliance because Kadafi has managed to cling to power so long and concern that the confrontation could settle into a protracted stalemate unless NATO ratchets up its operations.
WORLD
November 21, 2010 | By Christi Parsons and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
A NATO summit originally intended to allow members to signal an exit date for the unpopular 9-year-old war in Afghanistan instead concluded Saturday with an agreement leaving open the possibility that allied forces will remain in the unstable country for years to come. North Atlantic Treaty Organization leaders gathered in Lisbon signed an agreement with the Afghan government to transfer primary security responsibility from the alliance to Kabul by 2014, as NATO gradually shifts focus to training, advising and logistics.
WORLD
November 18, 2010 | By Laura King and Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
What NATO talks about when it talks about Afghanistan depends largely on who's listening. A series of carefully calibrated messages on the direction of the 9-year-old war, each aimed at a different audience, will emanate from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization summit beginning Friday in Lisbon. To a war-weary European constituency: There's an exit strategy. To a conflicted American public, whose troops are bearing the brunt of rising battlefield casualties: Things are going better militarily, but it will still take some time.
WORLD
April 1, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
NATO foreign ministers suspended civilian and military cooperation with Russia on Tuesday and ordered plans for bolstering defenses in Eastern Europe to show the Kremlin that it will protect allies in the region from any further Russian aggression, alliance sources told news agencies in Brussels. In their first meeting since Russia occupied and annexed Ukraine's Crimea territory, the top diplomats from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's 28 member states closed ranks in unanimously voting to increase pressure on Moscow to cease massing troops on Ukraine's border.
WORLD
March 26, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
BRUSSELS - The crisis over Crimea has not restarted the Cold War but has revived a "contest of ideas" between belief in powerful leaders and in democratic ideals, President Obama declared Wednesday as he laid out his case for firm opposition to Russia's annexation of the Ukrainian peninsula. Speaking in this European capital as two decades of diplomacy on the continent unraveled, Obama cast the crisis as a fight between "the old way of doing things" and "a young century. " Obama dismissed as "absurd" Russian President Vladimir Putin's justifications for annexing Crimea and sought to gird Europe for a drawn-out dispute.
WORLD
March 26, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
BRUSSELS -- President Obama is urging European and North Atlantic Treaty Organization leaders to bolster the military alliance's presence in countries in Eastern and Central Europe near Russia, part of an effort to ward off further Russian aggression in the wake of its annexation of Crimea from Ukraine. Speaking after a meeting with European Union leaders, Obama said he has suggested that European leaders review and update their “contingency plans” at an April meeting. He said the alliance needs to “do more to ensure that a regular NATO presence among some of these states that may feel vulnerable is executed.” Obama's made the remarks before meeting with NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen at the midpoint of his European trip this week.
OPINION
March 22, 2014
Re "Not your father's Cold War," March 18 I agree with Jonah Goldberg that the West and talking heads are mistaken in their reactions to what's happening in Ukraine. For one, it is much more complex than any of us can see. Also, Russian President Vladimir Putin has been canny in the way he has achieved his goals. He has truly befuddled the West. The same goes for members of the European Union. Goldberg is right that Europe essentially dismantled its military capability after World War II. NATO (meaning the U.S., the only member with a military large enough to serve as an effective deterrent against aggression)
OPINION
March 4, 2014 | By Edward W. Walker
The causes of the unfolding crisis in Ukraine are many, but most fundamentally its roots can be found in an enormously consequential decision made by the United States and its allies in the early 1990s. Faced with a strategic challenge of constructing a new security architecture for post-Cold War Europe, the decision was made to embark on a program of gradual NATO expansion to the east. A first round of accession took place in 1999, with membership for the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland.
WORLD
February 26, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
BRUSSELS -- The U.S. and its European allies on Wednesday turned up the pressure on Afghanistan to authorize foreign troops on its territory after 2014, even as officials acknowledged that they may have to wait for President Hamid Karzai's successor to resolve the standoff. At the opening of a two-day NATO meeting, Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen warned that all alliance troops serving in Afghanistan would follow the U.S. in withdrawing at the end of the year if Kabul refuses to sign an agreement with Washington.
WORLD
August 31, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
With Moammar Kadafi's forces on the run, NATO air crews have continued to pound remaining loyalist troops outside Tripoli in enclaves such as Surt, the longtime dictator's tribal stronghold 225 miles east of the capital. To some, the continued strikes again raise the question of whether NATO is acting as a rebel "air force" or is keeping with its U.N. mandate to protect civilians. NATO says it has not taken sides in the Libyan civil war, and has only supported the "Libyan people.
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - Five NATO troops died Saturday in a helicopter crash in southern Afghanistan in the deadliest incident so far this year for the international forces, officials said. The U.S.-led NATO coalition said it was investigating the incident and did not offer additional details. A secretary for Kandahar's police chief said that the helicopter was British and that five British soldiers were killed. There were no enemy activities in the area and the crash was believed to have been caused by mechanical problems, said the secretary, Esmatullah, who goes by one name.
WORLD
February 25, 2014 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Shashank Bengali
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - In a boost to U.S.-led forces in Afghanistan, a provincial court on Tuesday ordered that protesters end their blockade of the main NATO supply route through Pakistan. A two-member bench of the Peshawar High Court declared that protesters' ad hoc inspections of container trucks traveling into Afghanistan, which frequently barred trucks carrying NATO goods, were illegal and unconstitutional. Supporters of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party, or PTI, the ruling party in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, had set up unofficial checkpoints along a highway passing through the provincial capital of Peshawar since Nov. 24 to protest U.S. drone strikes in the country's tribal areas.
WORLD
January 18, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - The Taliban claimed Saturday that its devastating, commando-style assault on a popular restaurant was payback for a NATO airstrike that killed Afghan civilians, as officials raised the death toll in the Friday night attack to 21 people, including 13 foreigners. With Kabul's close-knit expatriate community reeling from the deadliest attack on Western civilians in the 12-year Afghanistan conflict, the Taliban, the U.S.-led NATO coalition and Afghan President Hamid Karzai renewed a war of words over civilian deaths that underscored the tension between Washington and Kabul as they haggle over a U.S. military presence in the country after 2014.
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