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Nato Expansion

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1997 | EUGENE J. CARROLL Jr., Eugene J. Carroll Jr., a retired Navy rear admiral, is deputy director of the Center for Defense Information, a defense watchdog group based in Washington
Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower was the first NATO supreme veallied commander. Shortly after assuming that post, he wrote these words in February 1951: "If in 10 years, all American troops stationed in Europe for national defense purposes have not been returned to the United States, then this whole project [NATO] will have failed."
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NEWS
July 6, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the face of it, NATO's imminent invitation to three of its former enemies to join the alliance stands out as President Clinton's premier achievement in foreign policy, a plan he sponsored, promoted and sold to wary allies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1997 | DANIEL T. PLESCH and ALISTAIR MILLAR, Daniel T. Plesch is director and Alistair Millar is research associate at the British American Security Information Council, an independent research organization with offices in Washington and London
The Clinton administration's attempt to portray the NATO expansion as a Marshall Plan for the 21st century both misunderstands and distorts history. The Marshall Plan was a civil program developed by Gen. George C. Marshall to secure the peace in postwar Europe by rebuilding domestic economies. NATO expansion is a military project estimated to cost between $27 billion and $125 billion over the next 15 years. Its only economic assistance packages will be for U.S.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the first significant organized efforts by opponents of NATO enlargement, 46 former U.S. foreign affairs luminaries released a letter Thursday to President Clinton calling the expansion plan "a policy error of historic proportions." The letter urges Clinton to halt the process and pursue alternative measures to ensure peace and stability for Central and Eastern Europe. The signatories include former Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1997 | KAY BAILEY HUTCHISON, Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) is a member of the Senate NATO Observer Group
It's been 50 years since President Truman dispatched Secretary of State George Marshall to Europe to rebuild that continent. Last month, another U.S. president, Bill Clinton, declared the unequivocal success of the Marshall Plan and called for a new U.S.-European relationship. Central to Clinton's plan is the expansion of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Simply adding new members to NATO hardly seems like bold leadership.
NEWS
June 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
Slovenians are stunned. They simply can't understand why one day they were flying high on the way to NATO membership, and the next day the biggest gun in the alliance has shot them down. President Clinton fired the potentially fatal shot Thursday, saying he will support only the candidacies of Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic when the 16-nation North Atlantic Treaty Organization opens its doors to new members at a July 8-9 summit in Madrid.
NEWS
June 14, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With presidents and prime ministers of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization now virtually certain to select three new members early next month, the biggest potential obstacle to expansion of the alliance may be sticker shock on Capitol Hill and in 15 other legislative chambers. Estimates of the cost of integrating Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic into NATO over the next dozen or so years vary alarmingly from less than $27 billion to more than $125 billion. The U.S.
NEWS
June 13, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton declared Thursday that the United States will support the inclusion of only three countries--Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic--in plans to expand NATO. In making the announcement, the president was rejecting the wishes of several European allies who strongly support the bids of Slovenia and Romania to become members of the alliance.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin signed his country's historic post-Cold War charter with NATO on Tuesday and then upstaged even that act with a stunning declaration that he will remove all nuclear warheads currently threatening nations belonging to the Western alliance.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the start of his current European swing, President Clinton has tried to convey one overriding message: The historical parallel for his controversial initiative to redraw the security map of Europe is the Marshall Plan. Tactically, the comparison makes political sense. The late Secretary of State George C. Marshall's plan to give an exhausted Europe billions of dollars to rebuild from the ashes of World War II was wildly successful.
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