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BUSINESS
January 16, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tenneco Gas to Develop 470-Mile Pipeline: Tenneco Inc.'s gas unit will also run the $170-million project in Queensland state. The 16-inch-diameter natural gas pipeline will connect reserves in southwest Queensland with existing pipelines serving the cities of Brisbane and Gladstone, the Houston-based company said. Construction is expected to begin in June and the pipe is expected to begin carrying gas by the end of 1996.
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BUSINESS
January 16, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tenneco Gas to Develop 470-Mile Pipeline: Tenneco Inc.'s gas unit will also run the $170-million project in Queensland state. The 16-inch-diameter natural gas pipeline will connect reserves in southwest Queensland with existing pipelines serving the cities of Brisbane and Gladstone, the Houston-based company said. Construction is expected to begin in June and the pipe is expected to begin carrying gas by the end of 1996.
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BUSINESS
September 23, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
ChevronTexaco Corp., Royal Dutch/Shell Group and rivals are studying pumping natural gas across Australia through a pipeline costing more than $668 million to tap rising demand in the populous eastern states. Two trans-continental routes were being evaluated to ship gas as far as 2,486 miles from fields off northwestern Australia to cities such as Sydney, said Daniel Smith, a Western Australian government spokesman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2009 | Jeff Gottlieb
An Australian company announced Thursday it had suspended its plan to build a controversial offshore liquid natural gas terminal 27 miles from Los Angeles International Airport, citing the downturn in the world economy. A spokeswoman for Woodside Natural Gas said the company planned to bring the project back when conditions changed. "Woodside's in this for the long haul," said Laura Doll, the company's vice president for public and governmental affairs.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Phillips Petroleum Co. and El Paso Corp. are set to bet $5 billion that rising demand will make it profitable to ship natural gas from Australia to California. Phillips and Woodside Petroleum Ltd., Australia's second-largest oil company, have signed a tentative agreement with El Paso to ship about $20 billion of liquefied natural gas from northern Australia to the U.S. West Coast starting in 2004. U.S.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1990 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Persian Gulf crisis sent stock prices tumbling throughout Asian markets Monday as the threat of war and higher energy prices fueled worries of a slowdown in the world's fastest growing economic region. Fears that inflation would push up interest rates in Japan helped send share prices on the Tokyo Stock Exchange down by 4.2%, the biggest drop in two years. On other Asian exchanges, share prices dropped 5.8% in Taiwan, the biggest loss in two years; 4% in Singapore; 1.5% in Seoul, to a record low, and 3.7% in Manila.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2007 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
Following an all-day public hearing that drew hundreds of opponents, a state commission voted Monday to reject the environmental impact report on a proposed $800-million floating liquefied natural gas terminal off the Ventura County coast -- an action that could effectively kill the project. The state Lands Commission voted 2 to 1 to reject the environmental study and not issue a lease for the BHP Billiton project. Democratic Lt. Gov.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2002 | James Flanigan
In a week when the price of oil rose to $30 a barrel because of fear of war with Iraq, and the ministers of the OPEC members said they would do nothing to bring the price down, it might seem a funny time to be thinking about where the energy industry will be decades from now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2007 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
A comprehensive study released Friday on a natural gas processing plant that would be built in the ocean about 20 miles from Malibu concludes that the project poses substantial environmental and safety concerns for the California coast. BHP Billiton, one of the largest energy companies in the world, wants its $800-million terminal to become the portal through which California receives natural gas from Australia.
NEWS
June 19, 2001 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal regulators Monday imposed round-the-clock price limits on electricity throughout the West, significantly expanding their previous efforts to check power costs and winning support from at least some of their critics. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, once deeply divided over how to help California, approved the plan on a unanimous vote, with three Republican commissioners joined by two Democrats, including FERC's most vocal dissenter.
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