Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNatural Gas Bolivia
IN THE NEWS

Natural Gas Bolivia

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Occidental Sells Bolivia Oil and Gas Interests: Occidental Petroleum Corp. has sold its Bolivian gas and oil operations as part of its ongoing effort to reduce debt by $3 billion. Occidental Boliviana Inc. was sold to Diamond Sol, a U.S. company jointly held by Diamond Shamrock Inc. and Sol Petroleo of Argentina, Los Angeles-based Occidental said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Occidental Sells Bolivia Oil and Gas Interests: Occidental Petroleum Corp. has sold its Bolivian gas and oil operations as part of its ongoing effort to reduce debt by $3 billion. Occidental Boliviana Inc. was sold to Diamond Sol, a U.S. company jointly held by Diamond Shamrock Inc. and Sol Petroleo of Argentina, Los Angeles-based Occidental said.
Advertisement
WORLD
November 25, 2008 | Reuters
Rescue workers rushed to help residents in southern Brazil on Monday after landslides and floods caused by heavy rain killed at least 59 people and forced more than 43,000 from their homes. The state of Santa Catarina declared an emergency as rescuers used helicopters and motorboats to reach those displaced or stranded after days of torrential rain. The state government said the floods and mudslides had affected 1.5 million people, leaving about 150,000 without electricity and eight of the 60 towns affected completely cut off by flood waters and landslides.
WORLD
September 16, 2008 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
Leaders of nine South American nations called Monday for Bolivians to "take all actions necessary" to help calm the domestic turmoil threatening to split this fractured Andean country apart. The hastily arranged summit, held in the Chilean capital, Santiago, underscored widespread fears that political violence in Bolivia could erupt into civil war. The presidents expressed strong support for President Evo Morales and called for an end to violence that could break up the country.
WORLD
October 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
Bolivia's government imposed martial law on a city outside this capital Sunday after at least five people were killed in clashes between troops and demonstrators angry about proposals to export natural gas to the United States and Mexico. Soldiers manned major intersections in El Alto, a poor, industrial city about eight miles west of La Paz. But the move didn't stop protesters who repeatedly clashed with the soldiers and police trying to disperse them.
NEWS
October 19, 2003 | Kevin Gray, Associated Press Writer
Embattled President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada resigned Friday hours after losing the support of his last key ally following weeks of deadly street protests over an unpopular plan to export natural gas. Under Bolivia's constitution, Vice President Carlos Mesa will replace him. A former television reporter, Mesa is a political independent and a historian.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2008 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
The sloping expanse of verdant hillside known as El Mutun doesn't stand out amid the lush semi-jungle straddling the remote Bolivian-Brazilian frontier. But the rust-colored stones strewn about provide a hint of hidden treasure: This is a mountain of iron ore. Forty billion tons of it. El Mutun is, in fact, the world's largest concentration of iron ore at a single site, said Pritam Singh Rana, Bolivian managing director for Jindal Steel & Power, a New Delhi-based conglomerate.
WORLD
November 12, 2009 | Chris Kraul and Marcelo Soares, Kraul and Soares are special correspondents.
Reporting from Bogota, Colombia, and Sao Paulo, Brazil -- The power outage in Brazil that left as many as 60 million people in darkness was the inevitable result of the country's failure to invest in infrastructure to keep pace with its economic and population growth, experts said Wednesday. Government officials said Tuesday night's blackout resulted from a powerful storm that caused a disruption at the giant Itaipu hydroelectric complex on the Paraguayan border, which generates 28,000 megawatts of power, or 20% of Brazil's total.
NEWS
May 18, 2003 | Michael Astor, Associated Press Writer
They come from as far away as Germany and Japan, eager to marvel at the alligators and to fish for rainbow trout in the tea-hued waters, to stand under skies busy with white storks and red-and-blue macaws. But the tourists don't come in the needed numbers. If ever a place seemed made for eco-tourism, it is Brazil's Pantanal -- the world's biggest expanse of wetlands. For years, people bet on the region's potential for economic development based on conservation. Not anymore.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|