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Natural Order

NEWS
September 28, 1986 | RICK GREENBERG, Greenberg lives in Bethesda, Md
"You on vacation?" my neighbor asked. My 15-month-old son and I were passing her yard on our daily hike through the neighborhood. It was a weekday afternoon and I was the only working-age male in sight. "I'm, uh . . . working out of my house now," I told her. Thus was born my favorite euphemism for house fatherhood, one of those new life-style occupations that is never merely mentioned. Explained, yes. Defended. Even rhapsodized about. Or in my case, fibbed about.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1992
Simple economics tells us that if you spend more than you receive, you will have problems, and if you keep spending more than you receive, the problems will be exacerbated. The solution to these problems cannot be more of the same. It's this line of thought that produces status barriers, making us look at one another with envy, coveting what our neighbor has, rather than making us realize that we all have the same opportunities our neighbor does. If we (the "poor" and "middle class")
NEWS
March 10, 1999
INVESTMENT Author Harry S. Dent discusses investment strategies. Tonight. The Olympic Collection, L.A. (310) 789-5528. WORKSHOP Join Jerome Cleary's comedy class at Artists Studio in West Hollywood, Sunday, Tuesday through Thursday. (310) 364-4500. TOUR The Venice Historical Society conducts a Historic Walking Tour Saturday, beginning at the Venice Canals. (310) 676-0020. DESIGN Expert Carol Assa discusses feng shui and the natural order of things. Thursday, Borders Books, Torrance.
OPINION
May 9, 2012 | By Robert Zaretsky
It was no surprise, of course, whenFrance'snew Socialist president, Francois Hollande, celebrated his election over the weekend at the Place de la Bastille. Once the site of the nation's most notorious prison, the square has long been the place that French leftists proclaim their victories. But while many commentators noted the symbolic importance of the Bastille, they overlook how this symbol has changed over time - a transformation that may hold a lesson for President-elect Hollande.
BOOKS
October 29, 2000 | DAVID RAINS WALLACE, David Rains Wallace is the author, most recently, of "The Monkey's Bridge: Mysteries of Evolution in Central America." He is a recipient of the John Burroughs Medal for Nature Writing
I Asked to name France's greatest poet, Baudelaire is said to have replied: "Victor Hugo, unfortunately." If this irony was apt to 19th-century France, it perhaps applies as well to 20th-century California, whose greatest poet, unfortunately, was Robinson Jeffers. Like Hugo, Jeffers has slipped into literary limbo. His reputation has fallen so far since his death in 1962 that when I recently asked about Jeffers in a Berkeley bookstore, the clerk had barely heard of him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1993 | JEFF MEYERS
Students returning to Buena High School this fall will notice that a giant cover-up has taken place. Where once was a 5,000-square-foot mural of a beach scene is now a blank wall painted off-white. Running the length of the gym wall and towering over the main quad, the mural was a campus landmark for nearly a decade. But even though it was protected with anti-graffiti sealer used on New York subways, the mural fell victim to graffiti taggers and the elements.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1990
Hats off to curator Norman Lloyd, whose intelligent curating would attempt to educate and revise the rigid images of a public that may in any event continue down the "heroic" road to cultural destitution. Board chairwoman Beverly Gunter's obtuse reading of the Lennon - Ono image is typical of those who reactively and unwisely attempt to remove from the public view anything that makes them uncomfortable or challenges their assumptions about the natural order of things. Lennon's respect for woman is profoundly heroic--that's what makes the photograph so extraordinary, and what makes him a hero.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS
Big skies, flat land and the theatrical effects of weather and time of day offer New Mexico-based painter Elen Feinberg ample room for variation. Her dry, careful technique cross-pollinates the 17th-Century Dutch trick of indicating distance with skinny bands of dark and light color and the 19th century's love of soul-inspiring atmospheric turbulence. In some scenes, Feinberg backs up to let the viewer see the ledges of the windows letting in these views.
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