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Natural Order

BOOKS
January 21, 1996 | Susan Heeger, Susan Heeger is a freelance writer and editor who frequently contributes to Book Review
Long ago, human beings noticed that other creatures could do things they couldn't. Greedy, people asked the bird for the power to fly and the mole for the power to tunnel underground. Not content with these gifts, the humans then demanded to live as freely as water, which undid them completely. "All of it was taken away from them," writes Linda Hogan in her novel, "Solar Storms," because "they had forgotten to ask to become human beings."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1992
Simple economics tells us that if you spend more than you receive, you will have problems, and if you keep spending more than you receive, the problems will be exacerbated. The solution to these problems cannot be more of the same. It's this line of thought that produces status barriers, making us look at one another with envy, coveting what our neighbor has, rather than making us realize that we all have the same opportunities our neighbor does. If we (the "poor" and "middle class")
NEWS
March 10, 1999
INVESTMENT Author Harry S. Dent discusses investment strategies. Tonight. The Olympic Collection, L.A. (310) 789-5528. WORKSHOP Join Jerome Cleary's comedy class at Artists Studio in West Hollywood, Sunday, Tuesday through Thursday. (310) 364-4500. TOUR The Venice Historical Society conducts a Historic Walking Tour Saturday, beginning at the Venice Canals. (310) 676-0020. DESIGN Expert Carol Assa discusses feng shui and the natural order of things. Thursday, Borders Books, Torrance.
BOOKS
November 2, 1997 | GEORGE ARMSTRONG, George Armstrong was for 28 years the Rome correspondent for London's Guardian newspaper and is a regular contributor to the Economist and to this paper's Opinion pages
This is the centenary year of the coining and first appearance in print of the word "homosexual," according to the Oxford English Dictionary, in which, in my 1965 edition, the word "heterosexual" can be found only in the addenda of new words. In a world where centennials are routinely and arousingly celebrated, why was this centenary ignored (though our Postal Service, perhaps unwittingly, did issue a postage stamp commemorating Thornton Wilder)?
SPORTS
August 18, 1998 | Jim Murray
This is the column I never wanted to write, the story I never wanted to tell. I lost my lovely Gerry the other day. I lost the sunshine and roses, all right, the laughter in the other room. I lost the smile that lit up my life. God loved Gerry. Everybody loved Gerry. She never went 40 seconds without smiling in her life. She smiled when she was dying. She smiled at life and all the people in it. When you thought of Gerry, you smiled.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers film for The Times Orange County Edition.
The biggest monkey in show business finally got the respect he deserves. When the Library of Congress announced its short list of films slated for preservation last month, there he was, among the chosen few. "King Kong," that oversized ape with a yen for small women, was now officially a classic. Of course, the 1933 movie, which screens Sunday at the Severin Wunderman Museum in an ironic and appropriate double bill with Jean Cocteau's "Beauty and the Beast," has always been a favorite.
TRAVEL
February 7, 2014 | By John Horn
MOUNTAIN PINE RIDGE FOREST RESERVE, Belize - As Hummingbird Highway carves away from Belize's resort-laden sands, pavement dissolves into rutted dirt tracks and the dense jungle canopy starts to press in from all sides. The tallest buildings pushing through the foliage are Maya ruins, and howler monkeys and macaws lurk in the ceiba trees. Late at night, distant thunderstorms ring the horizon, broad sheets of lightning illuminating the mountains. Before I brought my family to Belize for 10 days last summer, I packed a copy of "Heart of Darkness," knowing that although traveling through Central America wouldn't precisely parallel a trip up the Congo River, Joseph Conrad's novel would remind me that the book was the indirect inspiration for our itinerary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1993 | JEFF MEYERS
Students returning to Buena High School this fall will notice that a giant cover-up has taken place. Where once was a 5,000-square-foot mural of a beach scene is now a blank wall painted off-white. Running the length of the gym wall and towering over the main quad, the mural was a campus landmark for nearly a decade. But even though it was protected with anti-graffiti sealer used on New York subways, the mural fell victim to graffiti taggers and the elements.
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