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Natural Order

ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2011 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Entering the Downtown Independent near Little Tokyo on Thursday for the National Theatre Live's broadcast of director Danny Boyle's stage production of "Frankenstein," I found it impossible to leave behind the unfolding series of catastrophes in Japan that has the world collectively holding its breath. The current crisis follows us everywhere. With the hard-to-fathom images of flattened towns, the protracted suspense over radiation levels and the frustration of not being able to do more than donate to relief organizations, it's no wonder there's a growing hunger for deeper reflection on this multipronged calamity, in which natural disasters have set off an unnatural one. Journalism bombards us with passing information; artists call our attention to enduring truths.
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BOOKS
November 2, 1997 | GEORGE ARMSTRONG, George Armstrong was for 28 years the Rome correspondent for London's Guardian newspaper and is a regular contributor to the Economist and to this paper's Opinion pages
This is the centenary year of the coining and first appearance in print of the word "homosexual," according to the Oxford English Dictionary, in which, in my 1965 edition, the word "heterosexual" can be found only in the addenda of new words. In a world where centennials are routinely and arousingly celebrated, why was this centenary ignored (though our Postal Service, perhaps unwittingly, did issue a postage stamp commemorating Thornton Wilder)?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1992
Simple economics tells us that if you spend more than you receive, you will have problems, and if you keep spending more than you receive, the problems will be exacerbated. The solution to these problems cannot be more of the same. It's this line of thought that produces status barriers, making us look at one another with envy, coveting what our neighbor has, rather than making us realize that we all have the same opportunities our neighbor does. If we (the "poor" and "middle class")
NEWS
March 10, 1999
INVESTMENT Author Harry S. Dent discusses investment strategies. Tonight. The Olympic Collection, L.A. (310) 789-5528. WORKSHOP Join Jerome Cleary's comedy class at Artists Studio in West Hollywood, Sunday, Tuesday through Thursday. (310) 364-4500. TOUR The Venice Historical Society conducts a Historic Walking Tour Saturday, beginning at the Venice Canals. (310) 676-0020. DESIGN Expert Carol Assa discusses feng shui and the natural order of things. Thursday, Borders Books, Torrance.
OPINION
September 28, 2010 | By Chip Ward
Wolves, as you have undoubtedly heard, are once again thriving in Yellowstone. The 66 trapped in Canada and released in Yellowstone and the Idaho wilderness in 1995-96 have generated more than 1,700 wolves. To the delight of scientists and tourists — and the dismay of many ranchers — more than 200 wolf packs exist in the area today. Courts and government agencies are still sorting out how the wolves should be managed. But one thing is abundantly clear: The reintroduction has succeeded in ways that extend far beyond the health of the wolves themselves.
OPINION
November 16, 2009
Re "For many ill with the flu, staying home is no option," Nov. 13 Ah, the joys of the "let the marketplace take care of itself" school of government. About 22 million Americans are suffering with the H1N1 virus, and one-third of the nation's workers don't have paid sick days. In other words, the sick must come to work or lose pay and be disciplined. Thus we have a nice "How to Spread the Flu 101" program in place. Of course, we would not want any government regulation inhibiting the spread of this deadly disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1993 | JEFF MEYERS
Students returning to Buena High School this fall will notice that a giant cover-up has taken place. Where once was a 5,000-square-foot mural of a beach scene is now a blank wall painted off-white. Running the length of the gym wall and towering over the main quad, the mural was a campus landmark for nearly a decade. But even though it was protected with anti-graffiti sealer used on New York subways, the mural fell victim to graffiti taggers and the elements.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1990
Hats off to curator Norman Lloyd, whose intelligent curating would attempt to educate and revise the rigid images of a public that may in any event continue down the "heroic" road to cultural destitution. Board chairwoman Beverly Gunter's obtuse reading of the Lennon - Ono image is typical of those who reactively and unwisely attempt to remove from the public view anything that makes them uncomfortable or challenges their assumptions about the natural order of things. Lennon's respect for woman is profoundly heroic--that's what makes the photograph so extraordinary, and what makes him a hero.
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