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BUSINESS
December 2, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mega-Merger of Copper Giants to Pressure Rivals: The $2.4-billion acquisition of Magma Copper Co. by Australian resources giant Broken Hill Proprietary Co. creates a strong No. 2 world producer of the key industrial metal and puts pressure on rivals to cut costs, analysts said. The transpacific marriage was greeted warmly by analysts, but some wondered if the long-term copper price used to evaluate the deal was too optimistic and if BHP had picked the right moment to make its move.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
In 1970, Joseph Sax wrote a law review article that laid the foundation for a court case that would become famous in the annals of California water. More than a decade after publication of Sax's seminal essay on the public trust doctrine, the California Supreme Court ruled that the state had a duty to take into account the public trust in allocating water resources - an opinion that ultimately forced Los Angeles to reduce diversions from the Mono Lake basin in the Eastern Sierra.
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NEWS
November 17, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
The Senate today returned to the White House the nomination of James Cason for a top natural resources job in the Agriculture Department, marking its first rejection of a presidential appointment since John Tower was denied confirmation as defense secretary. "I can see the handwriting on the wall," Republican Leader Bob Dole of Kansas said in asking that the Senate not act on the nomination. Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
California communities spend close to half a billion dollars each year trying to prevent litter from mucking up the sensitive ecosystems of rivers, lakes and coastal waters, according to a report released recently by the Natural Resources Defense Council. Yet urban runoff remains a serious problem for fish, birds, turtles and marine mammals that ingest it: clogged intestines, restricted movement, suffocation, loss of vital nutrients and starvation. Then there is the derelict fishing gear - monofilament line, nets, poles, toxic lead sinkers and plastic lures that can last thousands of years - that can become deadly snares for marine life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1992
An Orange County judge has ruled that the state Department of Fish and Game lacks statutory authority to sue to protect natural resources from development. It's a disappointing but not necessarily disastrous decision for the cause of environmental protection in Orange County. The case involved approval granted Hon Development by the Anaheim City Council in March to build 1,550 homes and a commercial area in Coal Canyon.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1992 | Michael Parrish
In the decades ahead, traders and speculators will make money on air, water, forests and fish that environmentalists have long battled to preserve. Someday, so might you. But far from destroying the planet's resources, these new investors will nurture and protect natural riches while stimulating economic growth and human well-being, according to a growing cadre of business and environmental visionaries.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | PATT MORRISON
Unlike the grizzly bear on the Bear Flag Republic banner, the state's natural resources library--a 130-year record of Califlora and fauna--will not become extinct. When word came that the Fish and Game Department's venerable research library would shut its doors at 3 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1996 | RODGER SCHLICKEISEN, Rodger Schlickeisen is the president of Defenders of Wildlife, a nonprofit conservation organization based in Washington
Even the remarkable visionaries who drafted the U.S. Constitution could not have foreseen that one day liberty and life itself could be endangered more by environmental threats than by foreign armies. Against a backdrop of seemingly limitless wildlands and natural resources, they took for granted that we would always pass on to our descendants a fundamentally undamaged natural estate.
WORLD
October 1, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Wells at this giant Darfur refugee camp are drying up. Women wait as long as three days for water, using jerrycans to save their places in perpetual lines that snake around pumps. A year ago, residents could fill a 5-gallon plastic can in a few minutes, but lately the flow is so slow it takes half an hour. "The water is running out," said a breathless Mariam Ahmed Mohammed, 35, sweating at the pump with an infant strapped to her back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1992 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruling that California's wildlife agency has no authority to use the courts to protect natural resources from development, a judge has dismissed a state lawsuit that attempted to prevent a large housing tract from being built in Coal Canyon. The decision by Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray sent waves of concern rippling through the state Department of Fish and Game. Because the ruling came from a trial court, it sets no legal precedent.
WORLD
March 24, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
TAGHAR, Afghanistan - In a rugged valley outside Kabul, where mud-walled villages blend into bare scrubland, a team of international mining experts and Afghan trainees set up camp over the winter to probe the region's mineral resources. Protected by armed guards, they spent three months drilling test holes into the snowcapped peaks, as curious goat- and sheepherders looked on. "We hit copper damn near everywhere," said Robert Miller, a Colorado-based mining executive recruited by the Pentagon to help advise Afghan authorities on how to develop the country's natural resources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Virginia "Ginny" Hill Wood led a life of adventure beginning at a young age, guiding horseback trips in her native Washington state, bicycling through Europe before and after World War II, serving as a WASP pilot and, after moving to Alaska, building a rustic backcountry lodge and leading wilderness treks. But her lasting legacy may be her role as a pioneer Alaska environmentalist. Wood died Friday of natural causes at her home in Fairbanks, Alaska, friends said. She was 95. The outdoors enthusiast guided her last backcountry trip at age 70, cross-country skied into her mid-80s and gardened into her early 90s. But she also "had a vision outside of her own personal interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
A $500-million proposed rail yard near the Port of Los Angeles will face a challenge Wednesday from an environmental group that says the plans are a threat to civil rights and public health. The Southern California International Gateway, which Los Angeles harbor commissioners approved last week, would go up near the 710 Freeway and function as a staging area for trains hauling freight from the port. The Natural Resources Defense Council plans to appeal that decision to the Los Angeles City Council.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Americans will buy 581 million pounds of turkey meat for Thanksgiving this year but will trash more than a third of it, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council. Some 204 million pounds of meat will end up in the garbage after the holiday feast, according to an NRDC blog post. The waste is especially appalling given that the resources required - including feed, water and transportation - to produce each pound of turkey are equivalent to fuel enough to drive a car 11 miles and take a 130-minute shower.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2012 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Beaches across the nation continue to be fouled by sewage and storm water pollution that puts swimmers at risk of getting sick, according to a report by an environmental group. The Natural Resources Defense Council found that although the number of days American beaches were closed or posted with advisories because of contaminated water dropped 3% last year, they were at their third-highest level in 22 years. California registered a slight increase in beach closures and advisories in 2011, most of them in response to tests revealing elevated bacteria counts, according to the group's annual "Testing the Waters" report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Elinor Ostrom, an Indiana University political economist who in 2009 became the first woman to win a Nobel Prize in economics by demonstrating that local communities can manage imperiled natural resources as well as or better than the government or private business interests, died of pancreatic cancer Tuesday in Bloomington, Ind., according to the university. She was 78. Ostrom, a Los Angeles native who taught at Indiana University for nearly five decades, made her reputation by challenging a concept in the social sciences called the "tragedy of the commons.
NEWS
February 25, 1993 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their own rendition of the age-old wheeze about there being two kinds of people in the world, Alaskans tend to make the split this way: There are Alaskans--God love their hardy souls--and there are the "Outsiders." For the most part, this is a carefree tradition. Visit Alaska and people will try to sell you, ha ha, moose droppings glued onto souvenir swizzle sticks.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
Feelings of betrayal dividing friends, lovers, and political allies have provided grist for Shakespeare and Verdi, among other great scrutinizers of the human condition. It's intriguing to ponder what they would have made of the breakup between the Natural Resources Defense Council and Anschutz Entertainment Group, the would-be developer of a downtown Los Angeles football stadium. Last September, the NRDC's Los Angeles office did the stadium developers a big favor by throwing its weight behind a gift bill streamlining the environmental review process for the stadium project, and only for the stadium project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2012 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
An environmental group that has supported a proposed downtown Los Angeles football stadium and helped the developer secure special treatment in the courts issued a sharply worded critique Tuesday of environmental documents prepared for the project. In a 16-page letter to city officials, the Natural Resources Defense Council called on Anschutz Entertainment Group to rewrite and recirculate a recently released environmental impact report on the proposed stadium, saying it failed to fully analyze health risks created by cars that would travel to and from the 72,000-seat facility.
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