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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A report saying Orange County theme parks and Los Angeles beaches have the worst air quality among 18 popular vacation spots in the continental United States is marred by old data and flawed comparisons of urban and rural destinations, local, state and federal experts said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- With every part of California suffering from the drought, Gov. Jerry Brown issued a new executive order on Friday in an attempt to provide some relief from the persistent dry conditions across the state. Brown's actions run the gamut from suspending some environmental regulations to asking restaurants to stop serving diners water unless they ask for it. He also ordered homeowners associations to stop fining residents for failing to water their lawns. During a speech at an environmental sustainability conference in Brentwood, Brown said he was calling on all Californians and municipal water agencies “to do everything humanly possible to conserve.” “Our fire seasons are longer, and the dry season is upon us, so we have to take renewed vigilance,” he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1992 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying the Wilson Administration's conservation program has failed to live up to promises to protect the California gnatcatcher, a major environmental group has quit the effort and is urging the Administration to bring the issue back to the state Fish and Game Commission. The Natural Resources Defense Council resigned from a 12-member panel trying to agree on a voluntary strategy to safeguard the gnatcatcher, a small Southern California songbird.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
A decision by a federal appeals court Wednesday could allow for changes in water deliveries to irrigation districts that hold senior rights to Sacramento River supplies. The unanimous opinion by an 11-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned two previous rulings that found the federal government lacked discretion to alter water contracts with senior irrigators in the Sacramento Valley. The new decision sends the matter back to a district court for further consideration, leaving both sides in the nearly decade-old case unsure of the ultimate outcome.
NEWS
October 1, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER and MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Twenty years ago, John Bryson helped found one of the nation's most aggressive environmental organizations. Today, the former environmental activist takes over as chairman and chief executive officer of one of Southern California's largest polluters. The significance--and irony--of Bryson's ascendancy to the top job at Southern California Edison Co. and its corporate parent, SCECorp, has not been lost on either the business community or the environmental movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
California communities spend close to half a billion dollars each year trying to prevent litter from mucking up the sensitive ecosystems of rivers, lakes and coastal waters, according to a report released recently by the Natural Resources Defense Council. Yet urban runoff remains a serious problem for fish, birds, turtles and marine mammals that ingest it: clogged intestines, restricted movement, suffocation, loss of vital nutrients and starvation. Then there is the derelict fishing gear - monofilament line, nets, poles, toxic lead sinkers and plastic lures that can last thousands of years - that can become deadly snares for marine life.
SCIENCE
August 28, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
California communities spend close to half a billion dollars each year trying to prevent litter from mucking up the sensitive ecosystems of rivers, lakes and coastal waters, according to a report to be released  Wednesday by the Natural Resources Defense Council. Yet, urban runoff remains a serious problem for fish, birds, turtles and marine mammals that ingest it: clogged intestines, restricted movement, suffocation, loss of vital nutrients, starvation. Then there is the derelict fishing gear -- monofilament line, nets, poles, toxic lead sinkers and plastic lures made to last thousands of years - that can become deadly snares for marine life.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Americans are throwing out nearly every other bite of food, wasting up to 40% of the country's supply each year - a mass of uneaten provisions worth $165 billion, according to a new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council. An average family of four squanders $2,275 in food each year, or 20 pounds per person per month, according to the nonprofit and nonpartisan environmental advocacy group. Food waste is the largest single portion of solid waste cramming American landfills.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Arco Settles Environmental Suit: Arco Alaska Inc. said it has settled a lawsuit filed by an environmental group by agreeing to pay $1 million and to develop more ecologically sensitive methods for oil-field waste disposal on Alaska's North Slope. The agreement between the Atlantic Richfield Corp. unit and the Natural Resources Defense Council was approved by federal Judge Russell Holland, Arco said.
NEWS
April 15, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit on Tuesday upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's first-ever limits on air toxics, including emissions of mercury, arsenic and acid gases, preserving a far-reaching rule the White House had touted as central to President Obama's environmental agenda. In a 2-to-1 decision, the court ruled that the mercury rule “was substantively and procedurally valid,” turning aside challenges brought both by Republican-led states that had argued the rule was onerous and environmental groups that had contended it did not go far enough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | Emily Alpert Reyes
The Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to overhaul the way garbage is collected from tens of thousands of businesses and apartment complexes in what city officials, labor leaders and environmental activists described as a groundbreaking plan to put L.A. at the forefront of landfill waste reduction. "This is going to be the most exacting, the most ambitious, gold-standard waste recycling system not just in the country, but in the world," said Greg Good, Mayor Eric Garcetti's director of infrastructure and a former project director with the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Late winter storms have improved the Sierra Nevada snowpack, but it is still only about a third of the norm for the date, officials report. The snowpack is up from 24% a month ago and the abysmal 12% measured in late January. At 61% of average, precipitation in the Northern Sierra, a key source of water, has also climbed out of the basement. That has helped boost levels of the state's two largest reservoirs, Shasta Reservoir and Lake Oroville in Northern California. But both remain slightly less than half-full and state officials expect that this year will be among the 10 driest on record.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Officials announced Tuesday that they are temporarily waiving an endangered species protection to enable water managers to send more Northern California water south. The move comes as fishery agencies are under increasing political pressure to take advantage of late winter storms and ramp up pumping from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the center of the state's water distribution system. Mark Cowin, director of the state Department of Water Resources, said the rule suspension would remain in effect for the next week or two and would increase delta exports by as much as 10,000 acre-feet a day. An acre-foot is equivalent to a year's water supply for two households.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Melanie Mason and Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - A $687.4-million emergency drought relief package is on its way to Gov. Jerry Brown's desk after easily clearing the Legislature on Thursday. Brown and legislative leaders unveiled the proposal last week to free up the state's water supplies and aid residents who face hardship due to the drought. "Today we provide significant relief," state Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) said in a floor speech. "This is a lot of money and will help thousands of California families dealing with the drought.
SCIENCE
February 25, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
With monarch butterfly populations rapidly dwindling, a conservation organization on Monday asked the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement tougher rules for the weed killer glyphosate - first marketed under the brand name Roundup - to save America's most beloved insect from further decline. In a petition, the Natural Resources Defense Council argued that current uses of glyphosate are wiping out milkweed, the only plant upon which monarch caterpillars feed. The loss of milkweed is having a devastating effect on the life cycles of the large, fragile orange-and-black butterflies, which migrate through the United States, Canada and Mexico.
SCIENCE
July 2, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Beaches across the country are being polluted with tainted runoff and sewage at a stubbornly high rate, putting swimmers at risk of getting sick, according to a new report by an environmental group. The Natural Resources Defense Council found the number of beach water samples that failed health tests dipped to 7% last year from 8% the year before, but said the drop is the result of less rainfall flushing contaminants to the shore, not an overall decline in pollution. Delaware, New Hampshire and North Carolina had the cleanest beaches in 2012, according to the group's annual Testing the Waters report . The states with the most polluted beaches were Minnestota, Wisconsin and Ohio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge will allow the Building Industry Assn. of Southern California and Orange County's toll road agency to enter a legal battle against environmentalists who want to force the state to place the gnatcatcher on its list of endangered species.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2014 | Steve Lopez
If somehow you missed the news that California is drier than a stale tortilla, the Amber Alert signs have come to the rescue with highway bulletins like this one: "Serious drought, help save water. " This is helpful to a point, I suppose, and I like the creative use of highway signs heretofore reserved largely for safety warnings or child abductions. If Caltrans would consider pushing the boundaries even further, I'd spring for a sign that says: "Hey, Brian D'Arcy, where's our $40 million?"
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee and Evan Halper
WASHINGTON -- President Obama's discussion of energy and environmental issues in his State of the Union address was notable not just for what he said, but for what he didn't say. The president largely stuck to issues he had discussed before, such as how a good portion of the country's economic recovery, including the limited revival of manufacturing jobs, stems from the domestic fossil fuel boom, especially in natural gas. But he remained silent...
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