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January 26, 1990 | JOHN HORN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Is it a contradiction to love animals and still shoot them dead? A controversial new movie says no and depicts hunters as naturalists. Likely to become one of the year's more divisive films, "In the Blood" is a feature-length documentary arguing that big-game hunting plays an integral role in conservation. Written and directed by George Butler, a hunter from age 6, "In the Blood" takes the position that "one does not hunt in order to kill."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Horticulturists recently announced that they had successfully cloned a genetic replica of an ailing 130-year-old giant sequoia planted by conservationist John Muir in the 1880s on his ranch in Martinez, Calif. And many more are apparently on the way, they say. If all goes according to plan, the first clone nurtured in a Michigan laboratory will be shipped within a year to California for planting at Muir's homestead, which is a national historic site about 35 miles northeast of San Francisco, said David Milarch, cofounder of the nonprofit Archangel Ancient Tree Archive.
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TRAVEL
May 23, 2010
If you're contemplating a tour of the Galápagos Islands, a seven-night trip on the Isabella II is an ideal way to see the islands. The naturalists were incredible, and the staff of this lovely yacht tended to our every need. Seven-day tours from $3,750; shorter trips $1,607. Metropolitan Touring, http://www.metropolitan-touring.com . Anita Sherbanee Corona del Mar
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Scorpion hunting is something you shouldn't do on your own. For one thing, it's dangerous. For another, you could learn a lot more from naturalists at two Nevada wildlife refuges who will be taking visitors to see the desert critters this month. Hikes take place Saturday at Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge in Alamo and Sept. 14 at Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge in Moapa. Although you've probably never heard of these remote wildlife refuges, they're less than a two-hour drive from Las Vegas.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Scorpion hunting is something you shouldn't do on your own. For one thing, it's dangerous. For another, you could learn a lot more from naturalists at two Nevada wildlife refuges who will be taking visitors to see the desert critters this month. Hikes take place Saturday at Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge in Alamo and Sept. 14 at Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge in Moapa. Although you've probably never heard of these remote wildlife refuges, they're less than a two-hour drive from Las Vegas.
NEWS
February 6, 2012
There's so much to explore in the Rocky Mountains, but where to start? A package from the Rocky Mountain Park Inn in Estes Park, Colo., offers some interesting ways to learn about the area with a pro. The Rocky Mountain Explorer Package at the 150-room inn combines a one-night stay with a field seminar led by naturalists on topics as diverse as migrating birds and the secret life of beavers to hidden trails in the national park. When you go will determine what field classes are available.
HOME & GARDEN
March 24, 2005
LILI SINGER's "Callas to Have and to Hold" [March 17] compelled me to begin a stand of white callas. But her assertion that South African varieties do best in Southern California may mislead readers into believing that the U.S. has no arum lilies of its own. Many Angelenos from colder climes can recall the joy of seeing native arums poking purple spathes through the slush as harbingers of spring. The bright leaves that follow, are among the year's earliest beauties. The name Chicago is said to be derived from a Native American name for the plant, and naturalists have studied the heat-generating mechanism that allows a member of an otherwise semitropical family to thrive in Windy City parks.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | APRIL JACKSON and Address: north end of Isle Vista, Laguna Niguel and Miscellaneous information: only street parking available
Looking more like a mini-version of South Dakota than the traditional picnic table and tree-lined park site, Badlands Park in Laguna Niguel is a raw piece of land beckoning to the hearty, hiking-boot-clad naturalist. The 2 1/2-acre natural vegetation park sits atop bluffs above Three Arch Bay, overlooking Wood Canyon. Badlands, so called because of the terrain's sandstone bluffs that resemble South Dakota's Badlands, is on the outskirts of a new housing development on Isle Vista Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2006 | AL MARTINEZ
THE grumblings of animal-rights activists over the shooting death of that predatory mountain lion last week in Rancho Santa Margarita came just about the time I finally got around to seeing the documentary film "Grizzly Man." It's about an extreme adoration of animals and, in its way, creates a contrast to the incident of the cougar whose life ended because he had invaded human territory. The film reveals the death of an activist because he had invaded animal territory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1987
The Research and Education Institute of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center has donated a binocular microscope to the Friends of Madrona Marsh.
NEWS
April 10, 2013 | By Jay Jones
The works of Canadian artist and naturalist Robert Bateman will soon be showcased in a new gallery along Victoria's Inner Harbour.  When it opens May 24, the Robert Bateman Centre will become the  city's newest attraction. The gallery will feature 130 of his wildlife paintings, from those evoking British Columbia settings to his respected African collection. The 5,000-square-foot center will also include three interactive exhibits. For example, while viewing Bateman's 36 paintings of birds, guests can push buttons to listen to the sounds made by the various creatures.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
There have been plenty of films over the years that grapple with alcoholism, a wide swath that includes "The Lost Weekend" and "Leaving Las Vegas," "The Shining" and "Arthur. " Few have attempted to capture the highs and lows in quite the same naturalistic way as "Smashed. " The movie, which debuts Friday, is a breakout role for 27-year-old Mary Elizabeth Winstead, who has played supporting characters in such films as "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" and "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.
OPINION
August 15, 2012
Hetch Hetchy Valley reached a high of 99 degrees when I visited recently. But even on a blistering day, the lesser-known great valley of Yosemite National Park was a beautiful place. Brilliant wildflowers, shady glens, Wapama Falls cascading 1,300 feet and casting a cooling mist over the wooden bridges - and me - below. Opposite the falls, imposing Kolana Rock was mirrored perfectly in the still, blue water of the reservoir. That reservoir, which covers the valley's bottom 300-plus feet, has been wildly controversial since well before it was built.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Is French the secret language of childhood? Maybe that's why the French-speaking world has produced so many cinematic classics about children, from Francois Truffaut's "The 400 Blows" (1959) and Louis Malle's "Au Revoir Les Enfants" (1987) to Jacques Doillon's heart-rending "Ponette" (1996) and this year's French-Canadian Oscar nominee "Monsieur Lazhar. " Much of the oeuvre of the Belgian filmmaker siblings Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne also belongs in this rarefied company.
NEWS
February 6, 2012
There's so much to explore in the Rocky Mountains, but where to start? A package from the Rocky Mountain Park Inn in Estes Park, Colo., offers some interesting ways to learn about the area with a pro. The Rocky Mountain Explorer Package at the 150-room inn combines a one-night stay with a field seminar led by naturalists on topics as diverse as migrating birds and the secret life of beavers to hidden trails in the national park. When you go will determine what field classes are available.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Naturalist Anne LaBastille became something of a cult hero among modern women for embracing a distinctly frontier past. When her marriage fell apart in the mid-1960s, she took refuge in the wilderness, building a log cabin on a hidden lake in the Adirondack Mountains and then carving an influential writing career out of her remote existence. Both the women's and environmental movements were on the rise in 1976 when she published "Woodswoman," the first in a four-volume autobiographical series that celebrated her adventures — and inspired women across the nation to engage in the great outdoors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1997 | DADE HAYES
Journeying back to the days before smog alerts and beach closings, history professor Iris H.W. Engstrand of the University of San Diego will discuss early California naturalists Friday at Cal State Northridge. Titled "The 18th Century Enlightenment Comes to California," Engstrand's talk will focus on the efforts of Jose Mariano Mozino, a Mexican naturalist who visited California in the late 18th century. Her presentation will be the 1997 W.P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1992 | NONA YATES
Naturalist Peter Rice will lead an outing Saturday to the Santa Monica Mountains to study the plant life there. Children and adults can learn wildflower identification, the origins of plant names and how American Indians used the plants. The easy-paced, three-hour exploration is offered by the Wilderness Institute. The "Family Wildflower Walk" begins at 10 a.m. Call (818) 991-7327. SCIENCE POLICY Chemistry professor Frank S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2011 | By Robert D. Davila, Sacramento Bee
John D. Olmsted, a naturalist who led efforts to preserve Northern California nature areas, open space and trails, died of liver cancer March 8 at his home in Nevada City, Calif. He was 73. Inspired by conservationist John Muir, Olmsted spent more than 40 years pursuing his dream of a trans-California hiking trail ? roughly paralleling Highway 20 ? from Lake Tahoe to the Pacific Ocean. He proposed creating a public-land corridor that would connect a chain of natural landscapes stretching across Northern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2011 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
John Olguin, whose enthusiasm for the ocean made him a perfect teacher for generations of youngsters who visited the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium in San Pedro, has died. He was 89. Olguin, the longtime director of what was then called the Cabrillo Marine Museum, died Saturday at his home in San Pedro, said his daughters, Vi Olguin and Moni Olguin-Patten. No cause was given. Olguin was a Cabrillo Beach lifeguard captain when he became director of the museum in 1949. During the ensuing decades he started educational programs that introduced children and others to such topics as grunion, tide pools and whales.
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