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Nature Preserves

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another pocket of Cold Creek Canyon land, nestled in the Santa Monica Mountains, has been acquired by the Mountains Restoration Trust and will be preserved. The steep, 10-acre parcel sits just off Stunt Road and offers views of the sandstone rock formations capping the ridges and the grassy meadows below. The land was purchased in foreclosure from California National Bank. In March, the trust acquired 15 adjacent acres from Fidelity National Title Insurance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
September 1, 2013 | By Avital Andrews
When friends invited my husband, Tim, and me to their wedding in Occidental, Calif., I had to look up the place, even though I'm the author of a guidebook that covers much of Sonoma County. Occidental, I learned, is a postage stamp-sized hamlet (population 1,115) about 70 miles north of San Francisco and 10 miles east of the coast. As we drove in, I was surprised by its Old West flavor. In a region obsessed with all things French and Italian, Occidental is pretty darned American. It has saloons, checked-tablecloth restaurants and a white-steepled church built in 1876.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2000 | INDRANEEL SUR
The Canada geese might have flown away from the Chatsworth Reservoir with the arrival of spring, but that didn't stop residents and members of local environmental groups from touring portions of the wilderness area Saturday. Rosemary White, president of the Canada Goose Project, said nearly 150 people attended the event at the reservoir, which included educational hikes and a discussion about the geese, which can be seen in the area during the winter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The city of Whittier and a conservation group have reached an agreement to allow a controversial oil-drilling project under a nature preserve, a proposal that immediately drew fire from opponents. Under the settlement, the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority, a regional government entity dedicated to preserving open space and wildlife, is to receive up to $11.25 million a year from the city of Whittier's royalties from the oil. The authority will use the money to buy and preserve land elsewhere in the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gazing at the chaparral valley and rugged mountainside, Chumash Charlie Cooke said Mother Earth and Father Sky would be happy to see what has happened in this place of quiet beauty. Turning first to the east, where the day begins, he placed a conch to his lips to bless the land with the shell's plaintive, foghorn-like tones. The sweet perfume of burning white sage wafted from an abalone shell in the direction of the morning sun.
OPINION
January 6, 2013
Re "The Army Corps is on the spot," Jan. 4 Before the arrival of Europeans to the San Fernando Valley, the area was a Southern Oak woodland, populated by great valley oaks and the understory species of plants and grasses that thrive in and around these majestic giants. A riparian corridor (the Los Angeles River) once flowed freely through this place. Myriad species of birds, reptiles, small mammals and insects once inhabited this land. I propose a way to right the environmental wrong that the soldier boys have done: The Army Corps of Engineers should, under the strict supervision of experts, embark upon the full restoration of the Southern Oak woodland that once was here.
WORLD
June 8, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Several of the geysers feared obliterated by a massive landslide on Russia's remote Kamchatka peninsula reappeared after the water level dropped in a lake formed by the flow of rock and mud, the World Wildlife Fund said. Sunday's landslide buried much of the valley containing 90 geysers and an array of thermal pools in the Kronotsky Nature Preserve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1998 | STEVE CARNEY
The fall hiking season opens Saturday at James Dilley Preserve, where visitors can bird-watch, visit the county's largest natural lake and see sycamores in full autumn foliage. The preserve will be open for self-guided tours from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., and thereafter will be open the third Saturday of every month. Docents will be available to provide maps, directions and information about the preserve and the surrounding Laguna Coast Wilderness Park.
TRAVEL
May 14, 2000
A 130-acre nature preserve near Sacramento opens to visitors Saturday. The Cache Creek Nature Preserve has about 30 acres of wetlands, a riparian area along Cache Creek, one of the region's largest stands of valley oaks and farm buildings more than a century old. Entry is free, but reservations are required.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The city of Whittier and a Santa Barbara oil company prompted outrage Thursday as they began clearing trees and brush from a nature preserve that was bought with Los Angeles County tax dollars to protect it from development. Whittier purchased the land and its mineral rights 19 years ago with $9.3 million in county Proposition A funds, which are designated for conservation purposes only. But the city later reversed course, learning that oil deposits could bring the city up to $100 million a year in royalties - nearly double its $55-million budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The city of Whittier and a Santa Barbara oil company prompted outrage Thursday as they began clearing trees and brush from a nature preserve that was bought with Los Angeles County tax dollars to protect it from development. Whittier purchased the land and its mineral rights 19 years ago with $9.3 million in county Proposition A funds, which are designated for conservation purposes only. But the city later reversed course, learning that oil deposits could bring the city up to $100 million a year in royalties - nearly double its $55-million budget.
OPINION
January 6, 2013
Re "The Army Corps is on the spot," Jan. 4 Before the arrival of Europeans to the San Fernando Valley, the area was a Southern Oak woodland, populated by great valley oaks and the understory species of plants and grasses that thrive in and around these majestic giants. A riparian corridor (the Los Angeles River) once flowed freely through this place. Myriad species of birds, reptiles, small mammals and insects once inhabited this land. I propose a way to right the environmental wrong that the soldier boys have done: The Army Corps of Engineers should, under the strict supervision of experts, embark upon the full restoration of the Southern Oak woodland that once was here.
HEALTH
August 23, 2012 | Charles Fleming, Los Angeles Times
This is an unexpectedly verdant walk surrounded by urban sprawl, where the Los Angeles River, gradually being allowed to return to its natural state, is home to an amazing array of native fish, fowl, joggers and cyclists. 1 Begin your walk from the parking lot at the Griffith Riverside tennis facility, across the street from the famous monument honoring William Mulholland, who brought water to the desert. 2 Cross the mighty Golden State Freeway on the footbridge hidden behind the tennis courts and the soccer field.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Jarron Lucas tromped through waist-high brush at the Chatsworth Nature Preserve, flipping over weathered boards. "Let's see if anyone's home," he said, lifting a plank. Coiled underneath was a reddish snake with dark brown cross bands on its neck. Lucas reached down and snatched the young red racer. "It's just a baby," he said as the slender 14-inch snake writhed in his hand. Male, too, he said, judging from the long tail. A few yards away, he found a 4-foot adult female red racer thick as a broom handle.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2011 | By Jenna Portnoy, Morning Call
The bison herd at Trexler Nature Preserve owes Kelly Craig a debt of gratitude. "I just wanted to know, why don't we have any baby bison?" Craig said she often wondered during frequent visits to commune with the peaceful yet ferocious creatures. She did a little research and learned the nine females — or cows — at the eastern Pennsylvania preserve were on birth control. The family planning practice prevented any bouncing baby bison surprises, but it also meant a vital link to Lehigh County's heritage would eventually disappear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2011 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
The sound of hundreds of goat hooves echoed through a small valley overlooking the ocean Saturday in the Palos Verdes Nature Preserve, surprising passerby who watched as the animals munched their way through yard after yard of invasive weeds. FOR THE RECORD: Goat grazing: An article in the March 6 Section A about the use of goats to clear invasive weeds in the Palos Verdes Nature Preserve referred to boar goats. The correct term is Boer goats. ? The 230 goats are the first step in a project to restore natural flora and fauna to a 12-acre portion of the 1,400-acre preserve that was burned in a fire in 2009.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Jarron Lucas tromped through waist-high brush at the Chatsworth Nature Preserve, flipping over weathered boards. "Let's see if anyone's home," he said, lifting a plank. Coiled underneath was a reddish snake with dark brown cross bands on its neck. Lucas reached down and snatched the young red racer. "It's just a baby," he said as the slender 14-inch snake writhed in his hand. Male, too, he said, judging from the long tail. A few yards away, he found a 4-foot adult female red racer thick as a broom handle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun
Against a backdrop of smiling children, cheering officials and rolling grasslands, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa savored a groundbreaking ceremony on Nov. 1, 2005, for a nature preserve just northeast of downtown, declaring it "a historic moment for this community." "The effort was a great example of what can be accomplished when the community and elected officials work toward a common goal -- in this case, preserving green, open space for the public to enjoy," said Villaraigosa, wearing a white hard hat and clutching a shovel to turn the first spadeful of dirt at Ascot Hills Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2009 | Matt Schudel, Schudel writes for the Washington Post.
Jack Lorenz, who became a nationally prominent advocate for nature preservation during 18 years as executive director of the Izaak Walton League and who developed a code of ethics governing outdoor activities, died of a stroke March 2 at Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego, where he was visiting. He was 69 and lived in Woodstock, Va.
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