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BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Pacific Gas & Electric Co., indicted by the federal government for criminal behavior stemming from a Bay Area natural gas explosion that killed eight people and destroyed 38 homes, still faces more trouble. In the next few months, PG&E will face the likelihood of a fine from the California Public Utilities Commission as high as $2.25 billion for its role in the September 2010 disaster in the city of San Bruno. On Tuesday, the U.S. attorney in San Francisco announced that a grand jury indicted PG&E on 12 alleged violations of the federal Pipeline Safety Act involving poor record keeping and faulty management practices.
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NATIONAL
March 31, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
The owner of a natural gas facility downplayed the danger to residents after an explosion at the facility injured four people and forced the evacuation of a small town in southern Washington on Monday morning. The processing facility is owned by Northwest Pipeline, a subsidiary of Williams Partners, a Tulsa, Okla.-based energy company. The facility is located 2 1/2 miles west of Plymouth, whose 300 to 400 residents were ordered to evacuate after the 8:20 a.m. blast. The company was investigating the cause of the explosion.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Most people may take natural gas for granted. It fuels the flame on your stove, fires your furnace. It's there when you need it. For Sempra Energy, natural gas is big business. The San Diego company owns Southern California Gas Co., the nation's largest natural gas distribution company, and San Diego Gas & Electric, one of the largest publicly owned power companies in the country. Sempra reported net income of $1 billion last year on revenue of $10.6 billion. It has 17,000 employees worldwide and provides energy to more than 30 million people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
Wearing a dark blue traditional Iranian garment, Roxanna Ameri followed the rhythm of the music as she marched with others outfitted in festive shades of red, green and purple. Ameri, 18, was among hundreds of Iranians who flocked to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art last weekend for the sixth annual Iranian New Year celebration, hosted by the Farhang Foundation, a nonprofit that celebrates Iranian art and culture in Southern California. March 20 commemorates both the first day of spring and the Iranian holiday Nowruz, which translates to "new day. " The holiday, which ends Sunday in the U.S. and on Tuesday in Iran, is a time for Iranians across the globe to gather with family and friends to celebrate spring and the rebirth of nature.
NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Elizabeth Stein wanted to create a nutritious gluten-free product, because she found that as a holistic nutrition counselor there was too little to recommend to her clients who avoid gluten. So in January she introduced her line of three quick-cooking and one slow-cooking hot cereals. Purely Elizabeth cereals are made with oats, quinoa, millet, buckwheat, amaranth, kaniwa, hemp, flax and chia. She also has four versions of granola, including cranberry-pecan and pumpkin-fig.
SPORTS
March 22, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
There now, feel better? Worried that fat contract had actually made Clayton Kershaw relax a tad too much? That subconsciously he might just be feeling satisfied? That those ugly 0-3, 9.20 ERA, 1.70 WHIP numbers he put up in the Cactus League hinted at pitching mortality? Maybe not so much now, not after the left-hander opened the season Saturday looking an awful lot like the guy who is coming off his second Cy Young award at age 26. Scott Van Slyke provided the unexpected power in the Dodgers' 3-1 season-opening victory over the Diamondbacks in Sydney, Australia, but it was Kershaw who was again the dominating one on the mound.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"The aim of the poet is to inform or delight, or to combine together … both pleasure and applicability to life. " These words of the Roman poet Horace remain encoded in our cultural DNA. Even after the artistic revolutions incited by the Romantics, the realists and the various rabble-rousing factions of the avant-garde, the expectation endures that art should instruct or entertain or, better still, do both at the same time. Horace hard-liners, a conservative crew who would rather be educated by artists than amused by them, would no doubt cast a disapproving eye on the Echo Theater Company's indecorous (though sensationally acted)
TRAVEL
March 21, 2014 | By David Kelly
GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo.  - Since moving to Colorado from Southern California three years ago, I've come to hate winter. Scalding baths, wool blankets, the dog snoozing on my feet - nothing takes the edge off the bitter cold. It lingers in the air, in the bones and, most of all, in the soul. Then a friend told me about a place three hours from Denver guaranteed to rocket my moribund core temperature through the roof. I set off on a dark January morning in a raging blizzard.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The dinosaurs are getting WiFi. Time Warner Cable has hooked up the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County with wireless Internet access. The WiFi, available starting Thursday, is free to Time Warner Cable subscribers while nonsubscribers will receive two hours of complimentary access. Installing WiFi into the 100-year-old building was no small task, according to Mike Roudi, Time Warner Cable's senior vice president of corporate development. The walls are thick, and the museum has many small rooms.
OPINION
March 18, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
Will everyone please stop talking about a new Cold War? However badly things work out between Russia and the United States and the West, a new Cold War isn't in the cards because Russia today isn't the Soviet Union. Sure, we are in a diplomatic and geostrategic conflict with Russia, which was the heart of the old Soviet Union. Also, Russia wants much of the real estate that belonged to the Soviet Union before it collapsed. And Vladimir Putin is a former KGB colonel who now waxes nostalgic for the good old days.
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