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Naturopathy

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October 7, 2001 | JESSICA BUJOL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They come to the Integrative Medicine Center as a last resort, believing conventional medicine has failed them. A woman with chronic pain syndrome. A man with progressive heart disease. A young person dying of cancer. All frustrated and hurting, some desperate, others merely curious.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2003 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
People who treat illness with natural methods would become licensed doctors of a sort in California under a bill working its way through the Legislature. The bill would allow Californians holding a degree from one of four naturopathic schools in the nation to prescribe drugs, order lab tests, help deliver babies, perform minor surgeries -- such as stitching wounds -- and use the term naturopathic doctor, or N.D.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1993 | JAMES L. ENG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Natasha Puffer returned from an eight-month tour of Southeast Asia suffering from anemia, a chronic sore throat and the lingering effects of a parasite infection. Visits to nearly a dozen doctors over four years failed to cure her maladies, she says. The antibiotics she was prescribed wiped out her digestive system, and she developed severe allergies. She was ready to give up. Then she turned to a naturopathic physician. A year later, Puffer says, "I'm like a whole new person.
NEWS
October 7, 2001 | JESSICA BUJOL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They come to the Integrative Medicine Center as a last resort, believing conventional medicine has failed them. A woman with chronic pain syndrome. A man with progressive heart disease. A young person dying of cancer. All frustrated and hurting, some desperate, others merely curious.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2003 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
People who treat illness with natural methods would become licensed doctors of a sort in California under a bill working its way through the Legislature. The bill would allow Californians holding a degree from one of four naturopathic schools in the nation to prescribe drugs, order lab tests, help deliver babies, perform minor surgeries -- such as stitching wounds -- and use the term naturopathic doctor, or N.D.
REAL ESTATE
June 9, 1991
I think your readers would be well advised to know that there is considerable controversy within environmental indoor health circles regarding possible bioelectric interferences arising from dimmer switches. Many of these devices generate an electrical disturbance in the form of radio-frequency interference. The transmission of this "disturbed signal" can be visualized on an oscilloscope when many of these dimmers are turned on. Also using an AM radio tuned off-station (at the lowest end of the dial is best)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1996 | JAMES L. ENG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For Bastyr University, naturopathy has led to the good life. It's not the school's fragrant herb garden or the tasty whole-wheat scones served in its cafeteria. It's rising attendance and even funding from the federal government. Once dismissed as a fringe-culture fad, naturopathy is drawing a growing legion of followers.
NEWS
February 16, 1995
The practice of cosmetology is defined by the California State Board of Barbering and Cosmetology as any or all of the following: treating by any means the hair of any person; massaging, cleaning or stimulating the scalp, face, neck, arms or upper part of the human body; beautifying the face, neck, arms or upper part of the human body; removing superfluous hair from the body; manicuring nails; beautifying the hands or feet; giving facials; applying makeup, and performing electrolysis.
NEWS
November 8, 1998 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brace yourself: The next "So L.A." trend has arrived, and it's a gas! O2, the first food, drink and oxygen bar in Southern California, has opened its doors in the thick of the Sunset Strip. O2, owned by Hollywood herb man Woody Harrelson, may be nestled in Hedonism Central between Barfly and Viper Room, but it's meant to be an "alternative bar experience."
NEWS
January 11, 1985 | MARY ROURKE, Times Staff Writer
If you don't want a facialist named Gloria Martel to learn your innermost secrets, don't let her touch your face. When her fingers cross your complexion, she's likely to uncover anything. "A regular client came into the salon with a lot of outbreaks on her cheeks," Martel recalls. "I asked if she'd been eating white flour. It's difficult to digest, and it can cause blemishes." "At first the woman couldn't remember, but then she figured things out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1993 | JAMES L. ENG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Natasha Puffer returned from an eight-month tour of Southeast Asia suffering from anemia, a chronic sore throat and the lingering effects of a parasite infection. Visits to nearly a dozen doctors over four years failed to cure her maladies, she says. The antibiotics she was prescribed wiped out her digestive system, and she developed severe allergies. She was ready to give up. Then she turned to a naturopathic physician. A year later, Puffer says, "I'm like a whole new person.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2003 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
Most public school vending machines would dispense water, juice or milk but no sodas under a bill that cleared the Legislature on Thursday and headed for the governor's desk. Students could still take sodas to school, but they would not be allowed to buy them there under SB 677, by Sen. Deborah Ortiz (D-Sacramento), which passed the Senate on a 22-14 vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Nick Enright, a popular Australian playwright who shared an Oscar nomination in 1993 for co-writing the screenplay for "Lorenzo's Oil," starring Susan Sarandon and Nick Nolte as parents trying to save their small son, has died. He was 52. Enright died Sunday in a Sydney hospital of malignant melanoma.
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