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Navajo Generating Station

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1990
In your story "Power Plant Partly Owned by L.A. Implicated in Grand Canyon Haze" (Metro, Oct. 12), you write that a National Academy of Sciences panel "sidestepped the central question" of whether scrubbers ought to be installed at the Navajo Generating Station to protect vistas at the Grand Canyon. Unfortunately, you don't tell the reader why. As the one lawyer on the panel, perhaps I can supply the answer. The reason is that the decision of whether to control Navajo Generating Station is not merely a scientific question.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
The Sierra Club's Beyond Coal campaign, working in concert with a number of environmental and energy activists and researchers in Washington and Montana, announced Thursday a new push to get Puget Sound Energy to stop buying power from coal-fired Colstrip Generating Station in Montana. According to EPA rankings, the facility is the eighth most egregious emitter of greenhouse gases among power plants in the U.S. The campaign announced this as a "bold move" in their nationwide push to negotiate closure dates for coal-fired plants, or to get them switched to cleaner-burning natural gas, since PSE is also a leader among utilities in developing wind farms and pushing for greener forms of electrical generation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
When protesters were arrested at the management offices of a huge coal-fired power plant in Arizona in  December, it highlighted a very untidy fact about electricity in green-conscious L.A.: about half of it comes from coal. The protests were at the Tempe offices of the Salt River Project, managing partners of the massive Navajo Generating Station, which is a coal-fired power plant. As pointed out in this Alternet piece by Joshua Frank, the city of Los Angeles doesn't own coal-fired power plants, but L.A.'s Department of Water and Power still buys 44% of its  power from polluting plants across the state line in Arizona and Utah.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
When protesters were arrested at the management offices of a huge coal-fired power plant in Arizona in  December, it highlighted a very untidy fact about electricity in green-conscious L.A.: about half of it comes from coal. The protests were at the Tempe offices of the Salt River Project, managing partners of the massive Navajo Generating Station, which is a coal-fired power plant. As pointed out in this Alternet piece by Joshua Frank, the city of Los Angeles doesn't own coal-fired power plants, but L.A.'s Department of Water and Power still buys 44% of its  power from polluting plants across the state line in Arizona and Utah.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Where do air pollutants go to "get away from it all?" In Los Angeles, they head for the desert. Researchers from St. Louis, Reno and San Diego have found that industrial chemicals released in the Los Angeles Basin show up in the Nevada and Arizona deserts one to two days later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2010 | By Phil Willon and Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa on Wednesday brushed off a suggestion from an Arizona utility regulator that Los Angeles might stop receiving electricity from the state after the City Council voted for a boycott over Arizona's crackdown on illegal immigration. "The mayor stands strongly behind the City Council on this issue, and will not respond to threats from a state which has isolated itself from the America that values freedom, liberty and basic civil rights," the mayor's office said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
The Sierra Club's Beyond Coal campaign, working in concert with a number of environmental and energy activists and researchers in Washington and Montana, announced Thursday a new push to get Puget Sound Energy to stop buying power from coal-fired Colstrip Generating Station in Montana. According to EPA rankings, the facility is the eighth most egregious emitter of greenhouse gases among power plants in the U.S. The campaign announced this as a "bold move" in their nationwide push to negotiate closure dates for coal-fired plants, or to get them switched to cleaner-burning natural gas, since PSE is also a leader among utilities in developing wind farms and pushing for greener forms of electrical generation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
A coal-burning power plant owned in part by the city of Los Angeles was identified by the Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday as a major source of haze that impairs winter views in the Grand Canyon. The finding ignited a fierce battle in the Bush Administration over whether to require the Arizona plant to install costly cleanup equipment.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a battle lasting years, the Environmental Protection Agency today will propose a 70% reduction in pollution from a giant power station linked to winter haze that often obscures the scenic vistas of the Grand Canyon, Administration sources said Thursday.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | BOB SECTER and RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
What value should be put on preserving a breathtaking vision? Four hundred million dollars? How much is it worth to guarantee that the vivid details and bright pastels of magnificent sheer chasm walls don't wash into cold, faded blurs of blue and gray? One billion dollars? How about $1.6 billion? Those are some of the estimates of what it could cost in just the first round of a new, more aggressive, yet fuzzily defined federal assault on dirty air.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2010 | By Phil Willon and Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa on Wednesday brushed off a suggestion from an Arizona utility regulator that Los Angeles might stop receiving electricity from the state after the City Council voted for a boycott over Arizona's crackdown on illegal immigration. "The mayor stands strongly behind the City Council on this issue, and will not respond to threats from a state which has isolated itself from the America that values freedom, liberty and basic civil rights," the mayor's office said in a statement.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a battle lasting years, the Environmental Protection Agency today will propose a 70% reduction in pollution from a giant power station linked to winter haze that often obscures the scenic vistas of the Grand Canyon, Administration sources said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Where do air pollutants go to "get away from it all?" In Los Angeles, they head for the desert. Researchers from St. Louis, Reno and San Diego have found that industrial chemicals released in the Los Angeles Basin show up in the Nevada and Arizona deserts one to two days later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1990
In your story "Power Plant Partly Owned by L.A. Implicated in Grand Canyon Haze" (Metro, Oct. 12), you write that a National Academy of Sciences panel "sidestepped the central question" of whether scrubbers ought to be installed at the Navajo Generating Station to protect vistas at the Grand Canyon. Unfortunately, you don't tell the reader why. As the one lawyer on the panel, perhaps I can supply the answer. The reason is that the decision of whether to control Navajo Generating Station is not merely a scientific question.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | BOB SECTER and RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
What value should be put on preserving a breathtaking vision? Four hundred million dollars? How much is it worth to guarantee that the vivid details and bright pastels of magnificent sheer chasm walls don't wash into cold, faded blurs of blue and gray? One billion dollars? How about $1.6 billion? Those are some of the estimates of what it could cost in just the first round of a new, more aggressive, yet fuzzily defined federal assault on dirty air.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
A coal-burning power plant owned in part by the city of Los Angeles was identified by the Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday as a major source of haze that impairs winter views in the Grand Canyon. The finding ignited a fierce battle in the Bush Administration over whether to require the Arizona plant to install costly cleanup equipment.
OPINION
March 3, 2014 | By Catherine Wolfram and David Zetland
California's drought has everyone talking about ways to save water. Gov. Jerry Brown has implored residents to reduce their consumption by 20%. One writer suggested Angelenos share showers. A nonprofit is encouraging people not to waste even ice cubes that drop to the floor: Don't toss them, says Save Our Water, use them to water plants. Our conservation efforts, even the tiniest ones, have a second overlooked benefit: They also save energy. Water is essentially liquid energy. We don't think about it that way. But every drop must be moved, treated and heated.
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