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NATIONAL
November 8, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Three people were shot to death execution-style in a vehicle along a dirt road on the Navajo Nation, the FBI said. The victims were two unidentified men and a woman, Vickie Benally, 26, of Farmington. A motive was not immediately known, FBI Special Agent Bill Elwell said. The killings took place near the Hogback Chapter House, just east of Shiprock. Elwell said it appeared that all of the victims were shot while inside their vehicle, which was parked along a single-lane dirt road.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The U.S. Justice Department on Thursday announced that Anadarko Petroleum Corp. had agreed to pay $5.15 billion to clean up hazardous substances dumped nationwide - including radioactive uranium waste across the Navajo Nation - in the largest settlement ever for environmental contamination. The operations of Kerr-McGee Corp. - which was acquired by Anadarko in 2006 - also left behind radioactive thorium in Chicago and West Chicago, Ill.; creosote waste in the Northeast, the Midwest and the South; and perchlorate waste in Nevada, according to U.S. Deputy Atty.
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NEWS
December 23, 1997
John Adair, 84, whose photographs, films and texts documented the Navajo nation for nearly half a century. Born in Memphis, he began his field studies of the Navajo and Zuni cultures in the 1930s. His photographs, films and texts from 1938 through the mid-1970s are definitive references on Navajo health, silversmiths and culture. Between 1964 and 1978, Adair was professor of anthropology at San Francisco State University. On Dec. 14 at his San Francisco home.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
FARMINGTON, N.M. - Navajo Code Talkers became legendary for using their native tongue during World War II to transmit messages the enemy could not decipher. To this day, they are celebrated at parades and honored at military events nationwide. They've shaken hands with presidents, and their heroics have been portrayed in a major motion picture. But when they return home to Navajo country, it's often to something less than Hollywood splendor. Some Code Talkers live without electricity or running water.
NEWS
November 19, 1997
Kay "Kaibah" C. Bennett, 77, author and teacher who was the first woman to run for the presidency of the Navajo Nation. Born on the Navajo reservation near Sheep Springs, N.M., Bennett ran for tribal president in 1990. Her books included "Kaibah," about her childhood; "A Navajo Saga," about a family living in the 1880s; and "Keesh, the Navajo Indian Cat," for children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1999 | ALISA BLACKWOOD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For years, the wind, water, earth and sacred traditions were all the Navajos believed they needed to prevent illness and heal themselves spiritually and physically. That was before the development of Western medical technology, before the number of Navajo medicine men began to decline and before young Navajos began to discredit their own traditions.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2012 | Stephen Ceasar
Five years ago, the man Elsie Smith loved told her calmly from his hospital bed that it was time for him to go. He died with a hushed goodbye and a squeeze of her hand. Smith herself had been feeling ill for a while. Her bones ached and she vomited often. She soon mourned him from her own hospital bed. A doctor explained to the Navajo woman that her lover had died of AIDS. It was important that they check her blood, he said. She agreed. Two days later, the doctor told her that she had HIV. Her tired mind became flustered with questions, but she asked only one. "What is HIV?"
NATIONAL
April 7, 2009 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court has ruled against the Navajo Nation for a second time in its battle with the federal government over whether the tribe should have received more money for coal on its land. The high court, in an unanimous opinion Monday, reversed a decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, ending the tribe's fight with the government. "Today we hold, once again, that the tribe's claim for compensation fails," Justice Antonin Scalia wrote for the court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1990 | GARY HART, Former Sen. Gary Hart of Colorado was a Democratic candidate for President in 1984 and 1988.
Suppose the Navajo Indians pass a resolution declaring their independence from the United States. And suppose they send this resolution to the White House. Suppose further that the tribe creates its own militia, declaring it to be the Army of the Navajo Nation, and orders it to establish its own border patrol and customs service. Then suppose, upon this declaration, several thousand young Navajo men desert from U.S. military service.
NEWS
November 29, 1994 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Vincent Craig takes a battered old Alvarez acoustic guitar from its case and proudly points out where various country musicians have signed their autographs on its spruce top. "This is my baby," Craig says lovingly. Then, with a sly look he announces: "I do a takeoff on Navajo opera." Closing his eyes, he strums an A-minor chord and sings a quavering aria entirely in Navajo, replete with Pavarotti-like flourishes. It's called, "Grandpa, the Sheep Have Gone."
NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
FARMINGTON, N.M. - In World War II he served as a Navajo code talker, one of the Marines who became legendary by using their native tongue to transmit messages the enemy could not decipher. Years later, to express its appreciation, the Navajo Nation built Tom Jones Jr. a house. These days the 89-year-old Jones struggles to keep warm during winter because the only heat inside his house emanates from an antique wood stove in the living room. The electricity doesn't work in his bathroom and the floor has worn away, exposing plywood beneath his feet.
NATIONAL
December 29, 2013 | By Saba Hamedy
New Mexico has seen celebrations across the state since its highest court 10 days ago unanimously ruled it was unconstitutional to deny a marriage license to same-sex couples. Not so for the sovereign Navajo Nation, whose borders spill over into the northeast part of the state and where tribal law is clear: Such unions are banned. Some Navajo hope to change that, buoyed by the cultural climate shift underscored when the U.S. Supreme Court in June struck down part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act. Gay marriage is permitted in the District of Columbia and 18 states, the most recent being Utah, although officials there plan to appeal a federal court decision that overturned the state's ban on same-sex marriage.
NATIONAL
June 23, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A career daredevil in a T-shirt and jeans completed a 1,400-foot long high-wire walk across a 1,500-foot tall gorge near the Grand Canyon on Sunday evening in a feat broadcast with a 10-second delay -- just in case. Nik Wallenda's vertiginous feat came little more than a year after he crossed Niagara Falls from the U.S. to Canada on a 2-inch-thick cable, covering a distance of about 1,800 feet at a height of about 180 feet. But on that crossing, he wore a harness -- unlike Sunday.  “Literally, when he finished [Niagara Falls]
NATIONAL
February 6, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
It will be a walk, maybe even a lighthearted dance, down the Grammy Awards red carpet, an appearance like no other. Radmilla Cody, a traditional Navajo songstress from Leupp, Ariz., plans to mark her nomination for this weekend's Grammy Awards show in Los Angeles by donning full-on traditional Navajo attire, designed by her aunt, including moccasins made by her late grandmother. Cody received a nomination in December for her album "Shi Keyah: Songs for the People" in the category of best regional roots.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
What would you do with 20 minutes atop a lofty sandstone butte above Lake Powell? Find out on a helicopter hop to the top of Tower Butte , a pinnacle more than 5,000 feet in elevation near Page, Ariz.  Papillon/Grand Canyon Scenic Group , which operates sightseeing flights over the Grand Canyon and other spots in the Southwest, will take folks by helicopter to the summit of the flat-topped butte starting in March. There's no easier way to get to the high point of the remote formation that sits on Navajo Nation land just south of the Arizona-Utah border.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2012 | By Shan Li
Urban Outfitters Inc. said that Glen T. Senk, its chief executive, has resigned and will be succeeded by co-founder and Chairman Richard Hayne. Shares of the retail company, which operates the Anthropologie, Free People, BHLDN and Urban Outfitters brands, fell as much as 17% to $24.24 in midday trading Wednesday. Senk, 55, joined the company nearly 18 years ago as president of Anthropologie. He became a director in 2004 and chief executive in 2007. He will be leaving to "pursue another opportunity," but will remain with the company temporarily to assist in the transition, the company said in a statement.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It all started with an anonymous letter. The typewritten sheet of paper was dated Dec. 19, 1995, but the writer must have hesitated before mailing it because the envelope was postmarked Jan. 4, 1996. The letter--signed, "Navajo voter and concerned educator"--contained an explosive allegation. The writer claimed to have seen the first lady of the Navajo Nation, Regina Hale, beating her 14-year-old stepdaughter outside the presidential residence.
NATIONAL
June 23, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A career daredevil in a T-shirt and jeans completed a 1,400-foot long high-wire walk across a 1,500-foot tall gorge near the Grand Canyon on Sunday evening in a feat broadcast with a 10-second delay -- just in case. Nik Wallenda's vertiginous feat came little more than a year after he crossed Niagara Falls from the U.S. to Canada on a 2-inch-thick cable, covering a distance of about 1,800 feet at a height of about 180 feet. But on that crossing, he wore a harness -- unlike Sunday.  “Literally, when he finished [Niagara Falls]
NATIONAL
January 5, 2012 | Stephen Ceasar
Five years ago, the man Elsie Smith loved told her calmly from his hospital bed that it was time for him to go. He died with a hushed goodbye and a squeeze of her hand. Smith herself had been feeling ill for a while. Her bones ached and she vomited often. She soon mourned him from her own hospital bed. A doctor explained to the Navajo woman that her lover had died of AIDS. It was important that they check her blood, he said. She agreed. Two days later, the doctor told her that she had HIV. Her tired mind became flustered with questions, but she asked only one. "What is HIV?"
TRAVEL
December 20, 2009 | By Judy Mandell
"Volunteer travel is the best way to become part of the local scene, to give of yourself, to see the benefits of your shared skills and time, and to return home with fond memories," says Sheryl Kayne, author of "Volunteer Vacations Across America" (Countryman Press, 2009). Here are some of her favorite volunteer vacations in the U.S. Heifer Ranch Perryville, Ark. Heifer International works to end world hunger by providing sustainable gifts of livestock and agricultural training to impoverished people around the world.
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