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September 12, 1993 | RICHARD EDER
The three stories of William Styron's "A Tidewater Morning" were published separately over nine years in Esquire Magazine; the first appearing in 1978, the last in 1987. Perhaps only now, collected in a single volume, can we see how rich and remarkable they are. Styron has not published much since "Sophie's Choice" 14 years ago. There was a collection of essays, and a brief, lucid account of an episode of clinical depression.
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NEWS
August 15, 1989
Retired Vice Adm. Theodore Davis Ruddock Jr., 96, a naval gunnery expert and highly decorated veteran of both world wars. After serving on the battleship Utah during World War I, Ruddock concentrated on gun and ordnance development, testing and procurement. In World War II, he helped transform private industrial production lines into weapons factories, and then commanded the battleship Massachusetts and Battleship Division 4 in the South Pacific, earning a Navy Cross and a Purple Heart.
NEWS
July 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A man wanted in the shooting death of Maj. Gen. Marion Carl, one of the Marine Corps' most decorated fighter pilots, was arrested by the FBI in California. Jesse Stuart Fanus, 19, had been sought since June 28, when Carl was killed during a robbery at his home in rural southern Oregon. Fanus was arrested without incident in Pasadena. Carl was the Marine Corps' first fighter ace. He shot down 18 enemy planes during World War II and twice won the Navy Cross.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2000
Leon Grabowsky, 82, a decorated U.S. Navy officer who was youngest captain of a destroyer in World War II. Grabowsky was born in Paris to Polish immigrants who came to the United States when he was 3. He enlisted in the Navy after high school in New Jersey. He graduated from the Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1941 and was posted as an ensign aboard the ill-fated battleship Arizona.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kenneth J. Houghton, 85, who served 35 years in the U.S. Marine Corps and retired in 1977 as major general in command of the San Diego Marine Corps Recruit Depot, died of natural causes March 27 in La Jolla. Houghton enlisted in the Marines in 1942, fighting at Tarawa, the Marshall Islands and Saipan during World War II, and then in Korea and Vietnam. He rose to commander of the 1st and 3rd Marine Divisions and the 1st and 3rd Marine amphibious forces in Vietnam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - For decades, former eight-term Bay Area Rep. Paul N. "Pete" McCloskey Jr. has dreamed of a Korean War battle moment he cannot shake: Peering into a trench he sees the terrified faces of his teenage opponents, clutching wicker baskets full of grenades. He empties his weapon. Last week, at 86, he at last had an opportunity for personal reconciliation. As a member of a small delegation led by Donald Gregg, a former U.S. ambassador to South Korea, McCloskey traveled to Pyongyang with a singular intention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vice Adm. Bernard M. Strean, 91, a Navy combat pilot during World War II who helped establish the Naval Air Museum, died June 1 of pneumonia at a hospital in Arlington, Va. A native of Big Cabin, Okla., Strean graduated from Annapolis in 1929, where he was a member of the crew and football teams. During World War II, Strean led a fighter squadron on the aircraft carrier Yorktown and was involved in several engagements in the Pacific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1991 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Navy Capt. Marshall U. Beebe, a war hero who served as a technical adviser on the popular film "The Bridges of Toko-Ri" died here at age 77 Monday after a long illness. The World War II fighter pilot's medals included the Navy Cross, the Legion of Merit and the Distinguished Flying Cross. Beebe received a Purple Heart in 1943 after he was injured when the USS Liscomb Bay was sunk by enemy fire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
William Farrell, 81, a Marine Corps fighter pilot who served in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, died Dec. 12 at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo of complications from a fall. Farrell was born in New Jersey, but his parents moved to Los Angeles the next year when he developed double pneumonia and doctors recommended a warm, dry climate. He entered military flight school at age 20 and, on graduation two years later, he was stationed at Okinawa, Japan.
NEWS
August 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
Vice Adm. Stanhope Cotton Ring's version of the Battle of Midway was discovered by his daughter, Susan Keith, tucked away in a sea chest that Ring shared with his wife, Eleanor. Keith, from a venerable San Diego Navy family, said she came across the document about six months ago as she went through old records of her mother, who died four years ago. "I knew it was his letter," she said in a telephone interview from San Diego. "I recognized his gorgeous handwriting."
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