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Navy Cross

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
More than 140,000 Marines have served in Iraq or Afghanistan since the Sept. 11 attacks. Only 18 have received the Navy Cross, second only to the Medal of Honor for combat bravery. On Monday, the family of the 18th recipient, Cpl. Jason S. Clairday, gathered to receive his posthumous award and to hear the young man, who was 21 when he died, remembered as one "who set the standard for others to follow."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2006 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
His family in the Midwest never doubted that R.J. Mitchell II would do whatever was necessary to protect his fellow Marines in Iraq. "We were concerned about him, of course, but we always knew he'd take care of himself and the men under him," said Bill Raiser of Lamoni, Iowa, Mitchell's maternal grandfather.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2005 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Retired Adm. Barry K. Atkins, who received the Navy Cross for extraordinary heroism while commanding what many military historians believe was the only U.S. Navy destroyer to sink an enemy battleship during World War II, has died. He was 94. Atkins died Tuesday of natural causes in a hospital in Richmond, Va., a family spokesman said. A 1932 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy in his hometown of Annapolis, Md.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2004 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
A lowly Navy cook in World War II, Bill Pinckney never was one to brag. But on Saturday, the Navy did the bragging for him, dedicating its latest ship to a sailor who earned the service's second-highest honor for combat heroism but whose race kept him from rising in the ranks. Before several thousand on the docks of Naval Base Ventura County, naval officials commissioned the Pinckney, a guided-missile destroyer said to be the Navy's most technologically advanced warship.
NEWS
April 22, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A teenage drifter was convicted in a Roseburg, Ore., court of killing Maj. Gen. Marion Carl, the Marine Corps' first flying ace. Carl, 82, had survived three wars but died defending his wife at home. Carl won 18 air victories and received the Navy Cross for valor during World War II. Jesse Fanus, 19, was accused of kicking in the door of Carl's riverfront home in June, waving a sawed-off shotgun and demanding cash and the keys to the car.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1998 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pete Limon, a retired San Clemente businessman, has never met World War II hero Guy Louis Gabaldon, but he feels as if he knows him--so much so that he is on a personal mission to see that Gabaldon gets the recognition Limon feels he deserves. Limon and others in the Latino community want to see Gabaldon awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for exploits that earned him the Navy Cross and that were depicted in the 1960 movie "Hell to Eternity."
NEWS
January 21, 1998
Francis S. Prendergast, 55, a pilot who earned the Navy Cross after he was shot down in Vietnam and escaped his captors. Born in Chicago, Prendergast grew up in Brock, Canada, and was educated at Loyola University of New Orleans and St. Bonaventure in Olean, N.Y. He joined the Navy in 1964, and three years later was shot down during a combat mission over North Vietnam. Pursued and captured, he escaped and was picked up by a rescue helicopter.
NEWS
December 20, 1991
A Camp Pendleton Marine who flew his helicopter for 10 straight hours through oil-blackened skies and enemy groundfire in the Persian Gulf will be decorated with the Navy Cross today, the Navy's second-highest combat award for heroism. Lt. Col. Michael M. Kurth is credited with helping destroy 70 Iraqi armored vehicles as he maneuvered under high-voltage power lines and dodged anti-aircraft fire.
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