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Navy Seals

SPORTS
September 8, 2011 | By Ben Bolch
Reporting from San Diego — Like any good military man, JP Bolwahnn has it all mapped out. Shortly after he crosses the goal line for the first time, the ball cradled in his arm, the University of San Diego running back will turn toward the American flag and salute. The gesture will be for Petty Officer Danny Dietz, killed six years ago in a firefight with Taliban guerrillas. It will be for Lt. Cmdr. Jonas Kelsall and Chief Petty Officer Robert James Reeves, who died last month when their helicopter was shot down in Afghanistan.
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NEWS
October 2, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW
When U.S. officials decided to topple Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega, the Navy SEALs were chosen to prevent him from escaping the country last December. SEALs (sea-air-land commandos) crippled Noriega's private jet and sneaked into a tightly guarded harbor to disable his high-speed patrol boats. The price of such stealthy missions, however, is steep. Of the 4,150 Special Operation Forces members involved in Operation Just Cause, 11 were killed and more than 200 were wounded.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By Alan Eyerly
Sneaking Nick Brody (Damian Lewis) into Iran was supposed to be a quiet, bloodless mission. But the CIA operation quickly deteriorates into a loud, bloody fiasco on “Good Night,” Episode 310 of Showtime's “Homeland.” The scheme calls for Navy SEALs to drop off Brody at the Iraq-Iran border so he can seek asylum in Tehran by falsely claiming responsibility for the CIA headquarters bombing. While being exploited for his propaganda value, Brody would kill the leader of Iran's spy agency.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Michael Ordoña
First-time feature production designer Jeremy Hindle admits to some dicey feelings while taking director Kathryn Bigelow on an initial walk-through of "Zero Dark Thirty's" key set. But they weren't rookie jitters. "I remember telling her, 'You're going to feel insanely creepy. You're going to feel like he lived here,'" Hindle says. The verisimilitude Bigelow demanded for all aspects of the film was particularly important to the re-creation of the compound in which Osama bin Laden was killed by Navy SEALs last year.
WORLD
November 24, 2011 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
The last time he was in Panama, former dictator Manuel Noriega was being bombarded around the clock with deafening pop and heavy metal music as American troops tried to flush him out of the Vatican diplomatic mission where he had taken refuge. Now, after more than two decades in prison in the United States and in France, the ex-general who ran the strategic Central American state with an iron fist between 1983 and 1989 is likely to be back home for Christmas after a Paris court on Wednesday approved his extradition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- Four rescue specialists from the California Air National Guard remain aboard a disabled sailboat to treat a sick child, the Guard's 129th Rescue Wing said late Saturday afternoon. No decision has been made whether the child will be transferred to a U.S. Navy ship headed toward the boat or evacuated by air to San Diego, a Guard spokesman said. The sailboat is estimated to be more than 1,000 miles off Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. The effort to help the child has involved the Coast Guard, Air National Guard and Navy.
NEWS
March 27, 2003 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
Taking a page from "Cheers," where everyone knows their names, patrons of an Irvine eatery held a goodbye party Wednesday night for their favorite bartender, who re-upped in the Navy reserves after the terrorist attacks of 2001 and reports for active duty today. Steve Sindoni was caught off-guard by the tribute when he arrived for work at Vessia Ristorante. Instead of the usual handful of folks, he found every stool taken by well-wishers. Fittingly, the bar area is called Cheerzini.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Navy SEALs, who call themselves the "Silent Professionals," traditionally avoid being identified or photographed by the media. Brave men under extraordinary circumstances, they seem to be afraid of only one thing: a camera. But, as branches of the armed services jockey for the ever-diminishing pool of recruits and funds, SEALs and other traditionally low-profile military branches are inching toward the spotlight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When U.S. officials decided to topple Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega, the Navy SEALs were chosen to prevent him from escaping the country last December. SEALs, sea-air-land commandos, crippled Noriega's private jet and snuck into a tightly guarded harbor to disable his high-speed patrol boats. The price of such stealthy missions, however, is steep. Of the 4,150 special forces members involved in Operation Just Cause, 11 were killed and more than 200 were wounded.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
NORFOLK, Va. - As heavily armed pirates held an American sailboat off the coast of Somalia in February 2011, Navy SEALs on the bridge of the guided missile destroyer Sterett heard one of the hijackers on the radio threatening the lives of his four American hostages. "I am holding these people. They are like meat," he said. "I will eat if you head my way. " What happened next is providing riveting testimony in a federal courtroom here as three rail-thin Somali men in baggy coats face the first U.S. murder trial of piracy suspects in nearly two centuries.
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