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WORLD
January 27, 2003 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
With a new crew and some fresh paint, the U.S. destroyer Fletcher left this Indian Ocean port Sunday -- bound to make its mark on the Persian Gulf and Navy history. The vessel, capable of launching Tomahawk missiles, is part of a culture-busting experiment by the Navy to see whether the sea service can overcome a modern dilemma by dropping an old tradition: that a crew stays with its ship.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2009 | Tony Perry and Daniel Weikel
Electronic warning systems and a computerized "notice to all airmen" system exist to prevent midair collisions like the one Thursday night off San Clemente Island that apparently killed nine military members. But as a Coast Guard admiral noted ruefully Friday, "No system is perfect." Even in an age of sophisticated collision-detection warning equipment, communication gear and an instantaneous message board notifying all pilots of military maneuvers, the fundamental safety procedure remains "see and avoid."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
CORONADO, Calif. -- The U.S. Navy has decided to spend as much as $600,000 for landscaping and architectural modifications to obscure the fact that one its building complexes looks like a swastika from the air. The four L-shaped buildings, constructed in the late 1960s, are part of the amphibious base at Coronado and serve as barracks for Seabees. From the ground and from inside nearby buildings, the controversial shape cannot be seen.
WORLD
August 3, 2009 | Tony Perry
The remains of a Navy pilot shot down at the onset of the Persian Gulf War -- the first U.S. combat casualty of the 1991 conflict -- have been recovered by Marines in western Iraq and identified by military specialists. The findings, based on dental records, appear to finally bring to an end the mystery of just what happened to Navy Capt. Michael Scott Speicher. Then-Defense Secretary Dick Cheney had announced that Speicher was the first U.S.
NEWS
February 11, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA and SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The nuclear-powered U.S. submarine that struck a Japanese fishing vessel filled with teenagers was apparently conducting an emergency surfacing exercise in choppy waters, Navy officials said Saturday. Details of the accident, however, remain unclear.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Flaws in the development of the newest version of the FA-18 E/F Super Hornet fighter could jeopardize an $8.8-billion Boeing Co. contract to continue early production of the jet, according to a congressional report. The General Accounting Office, the audit arm of Congress, said it identified 84 deficiencies in the FA-18 E/F Super Hornet, the latest version of Boeing's most important military aircraft program.
NEWS
June 5, 1998 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Fifty-six years after the carrier Yorktown sank in the battle of Midway--at a turning point of World War II--researchers Thursday released the first photograph of the wreckage three miles down on the Pacific Ocean floor. A team of National Geographic researchers working with a San Diego-based U.S.
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
In a corner of history far from the Pentagon fraud scandal that is now consuming his life, Melvyn R. Paisley was a hero--a World War II ace fighter pilot with a reputation for daring and a raft of medals to prove it. Like every other fighter pilot of that time, the young Paisley lived by his wits and flew by the seat of his pants. In defense of his country he suffered permanent ear damage, but when the dogfights were over, Paisley was always the victor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2005 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
In the midst of the Cold War, when Nike missile sites dotted the Southland, a bright red runaway Navy drone airplane veered off course and headed for Los Angeles, triggering a dangerous sequence of events known as the "Battle of Palmdale." It's not a battle that the military could say it won back on Aug. 16, 1956.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2009 | Corina Knoll
Flight was always on his mind. As he plowed soybean fields and chopped cotton in his tiny hometown of Heth, Ark., Jerry Hodges passed the time by imagining himself streaking across the sky in the cockpit of a Navy plane. As a teenager growing up in the 1930s, it seemed an impossible dream. There was no such thing as a black fighter pilot and the Navy was not about to accept its first. But on Sunday, a gray-haired Hodges regaled a small audience with tales of flying bombers during World War II.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2009 | Kim Murphy
Some of the nation's most sophisticated military submarines are based in the chilly waters of Puget Sound, an inlet of islands, peninsulas and harbors that is worryingly vulnerable to terrorist attack from a furtive diver or brazen suicide swimmer. But the Navy's plan to use a squadron of highly trained dolphins and sea lions to patrol and protect the submarine fleet is running into opposition from those who fear the glacier-fed waters of the sound are too frigid for warm-water dolphins.
NATIONAL
February 10, 2009
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2008 | Tony Perry, Perry is a Times staff writer
With their maze of aging pipes and narrow catwalks high above the Persian Gulf, they look like something out of "Waterworld," Kevin Costner's post-apocalyptic vision of the future. Their names too seem lifted from a sci-fi flick: ABOT and KAAOT. But the two Iraqi oil platforms 20 miles off the port of Umm al Qasr are considered tempting targets for terrorists thirsting to traumatize the world's oil supply and short-circuit Iraq's march to self-sufficiency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2008 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
To the world it might be called a robot boat, but its proper name is the Unmanned Surface Vehicle, and the U.S. Navy expects it to be a major tool in countering what officials believe is a growing threat posed by quiet diesel-powered submarines owned by rogue nations. In advance of the official roll-out today, reporters were allowed to see the boat on Thursday at Naval Base Point Loma before it took a trial run on San Diego Bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2008 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Navy will restrict the use of low-frequency active sonar during training to prevent possible harm to whales and other creatures, under an agreement reached with environmental groups Tuesday. The accord, approved by a federal court in San Francisco, would restrict the use of a type of sonar in areas in the Pacific Ocean that are known to be whale breeding grounds and key habitat, such as the Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary off Hawaii.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The 18-year-old bar girl said she wanted to kill herself, so Richard Gordon, the mayor of this city outside the U.S. naval base, produced his 9-millimeter automatic, placed it in front of her and said, "OK, go ahead." The girl, one of 26 AIDS victims in Olongapo, studied the gun for a moment and then broke down. She and the mayor ended the session in a tearful embrace. But Gordon knew he had not gotten through to her. That was 30 days ago. Finally, on Tuesday morning, Gordon reached her.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2008 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
With a bulbous head and plank-like wings, the aircraft resembles a lumbering whale. And its seven-word, 49-letter name -- Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aerial System -- is a whopper. But the award last month of a Navy contract to build the hulking, robotic patrol plane, nicknamed BAMS, could not have come at a better time for Northrop Grumman Corp. and, in particular, its military aircraft business headquartered in El Segundo.
NATIONAL
April 14, 2008 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
When John McCain limped home from a Hanoi prison camp in 1973 with a badly injured knee that he could not bend, Navy doctors gave him the bad news: His 15-year career as a jet pilot was over. He would never fly again. But McCain surprised his doctors by making a dramatic comeback. With a ferocious determination to fly again and a tough physical therapy regimen, he got his wings back and not long after was awarded command of the Navy's largest aviation squadron, VA-174, at Cecil Field in Florida.
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