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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
In a speech to Jewish leaders in Los Angeles on Thursday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu drew parallels between Nazi Germany and Iran, warning of dire consequences if anti-Jewish rhetoric is allowed to go unchecked. "There is a regime today that calls daily for our annihilation, openly and unabashedly," Netanyahu told a crowd of several hundred people gathered at the Museum of Tolerance, which houses Holocaust-related materials. "Our principal lesson in history is that when someone says they're going to annihilate you, take them seriously.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | Frederick N. Rasmussen
Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who became a major voice in the campaign to gain reparations from companies that transported victims to concentration camps during World War II, died in his sleep Saturday at his home in Pikesville, Md. He was 93. Bretholz played a leading role in a campaign to require SNCF, the French railway system that historians have said conveyed 76,000 people to Nazi camps, to pay reparations to U.S. Holocaust survivors....
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NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
When poor, persecuted Tom Perkins, mega-millionaire financier and member in excellent standing of the nation's Richie Rich club, went off in a letter to the Wall Street Journal about how his enemies were trying to bring him down, he didn't know how right he was. As the satirical “Pogo” comic strip famously observed, “We have met the enemy, and he is us.” Perkins made himself into the caricature of an arrogant, out-of-touch plutocrat beyond...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
In a speech to Jewish leaders in Los Angeles on Thursday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu drew parallels between Nazi Germany and Iran, warning of dire consequences if anti-Jewish rhetoric is allowed to go unchecked. "There is a regime today that calls daily for our annihilation, openly and unabashedly," Netanyahu told a crowd of several hundred people gathered at the Museum of Tolerance, which houses Holocaust-related materials. "Our principal lesson in history is that when someone says they're going to annihilate you, take them seriously.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2013 | From Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Hans Massaquoi, a former managing editor of Ebony magazine who wrote a distinctive memoir about his unusual childhood growing up black in Nazi Germany, died in Jacksonville, Fla., on Saturday, his 87th birthday. He had been hospitalized over the Christmas holidays, said his son, Hans J. Massaquoi Jr. Inspired by the late Alex Haley, the author of "Roots," Massaquoi decided to share his experience of being "both an insider in Nazi Germany and, paradoxically, an endangered outsider.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
For both audiences who admire it and the protagonist who lives it, the intense, emotional "Lore" is a picture from life's other side. While stories dealing with the suffering surrounding World War II and the Holocaust are a dramatic staple, "Lore" flips things around and involves us in a different side of war, in the confusion and pain of the young children of the Nazi hierarchy left alone and abandoned by the exigencies of fate and the fecklessness of...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2005 | Earl Gustkey, Special to The Times
Max Schmeling, who unwittingly became a symbol of Nazi Germany in two dramatic 1930s bouts with American heavyweight boxer Joe Louis, died Wednesday at his home in Hollenstedt, Germany. He was 99. According to his foundation, the former world heavyweight champion was buried Friday after a private ceremony at an undisclosed location. No cause of death was reported. Schmeling's reign as champion had already ended when he agreed to fight the fast-rising Louis in 1936.
NEWS
July 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
Russia's Constitutional Court stepped into one of the country's most prickly post-Cold War disputes Tuesday, striking down parts of a law that would prevent the return of art the Soviet army plundered from Nazi Germany after World War II. The law now goes back to parliament for revision, leaving more than 1 million paintings, books, coins and other so-called trophy art in the museum basements that have housed them for half a century.
NEWS
November 12, 1998 | Book Review RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
"I call the ocean the holy sea," wrote the child Annette Wolfram, whose family, after the nightmare of fleeing Nazi Germany and fighting the endless battle of immigration papers, visa quotas and other bureaucratic hurdles, found itself at last aboard a ship to New York. To Annette and many other refugees, the ocean was the antechamber to salvation, or at least escape from destruction.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Susan Stone
POTSDAM, Germany - Biting cold and a blue, blue April sky marked the day as perfect for a foot race. On the back lot of Babelsberg Film Studio here outside of the German capital, young actors Sophie Nélisse and Nico Liersch took their marks, got set and dashed off through the cobblestoned snow, laughter bouncing and blond heads glinting in the sun. Their characters - best friends Liesel Meminger and Rudy Steiner - are bright lights in a...
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
When poor, persecuted Tom Perkins, mega-millionaire financier and member in excellent standing of the nation's Richie Rich club, went off in a letter to the Wall Street Journal about how his enemies were trying to bring him down, he didn't know how right he was. As the satirical “Pogo” comic strip famously observed, “We have met the enemy, and he is us.” Perkins made himself into the caricature of an arrogant, out-of-touch plutocrat beyond...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
The historical drama "The Book Thief," based on Markus Zusak's novel about a young girl who develops a passion for reading against the backdrop of World War II, has been called out by some critics for being too safe and sanitized in its depiction of the horrors of Nazi Germany. In a review for The Times , for example, Robert Abele wrote that the film puts " an odd emphasis on uplift over unease. And, most peculiarly, it's a tale narrated by Death … that wants tears shed for tragedies that befall its big-hearted non-Jewish German characters, but skirts explicitly addressing the fate of that generation's Jews.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2013 | By August Brown
Bob Dylan is under investigation by French authorities over comments he made in a 2012 interview for Rolling Stone in which he appeared to compare Croatia to Nazi Germany. According to the Paris prosecutor's office, Dylan has been placed under formal investigation by the Paris Main Court for "public injury" and "incitement to hatred,"  CNN reports. The singer was served notice of the investigation last month. That investigation follows a legal complaint lodged by a Croatian group over Dylan's comments, during a long criticism of race relations in the U.S.,in which he said:  "It's a distraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By David Ng
As details emerged this week about a discovered cache of art that is believed to have been looted by the Nazis during World War II, officials in Germany have revealed that the trove includes works by Renoir, Toulouse-Lautrec, Picasso and Chagall. The cache also includes rarely seen 16th century pieces by German artist Albrecht Dürer and the 18th century Italian painter Canaletto. The Times reported Tuesday that the trove contains 1,406 pieces as revealed by German officials at a news conference in the city of Augsburg.  Early last year German authorities seized 121 framed and 1,285 unframed works from the Munich apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, the son of the well-known Nazi-era art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Susan Stone
POTSDAM, Germany - Biting cold and a blue, blue April sky marked the day as perfect for a foot race. On the back lot of Babelsberg Film Studio here outside of the German capital, young actors Sophie Nélisse and Nico Liersch took their marks, got set and dashed off through the cobblestoned snow, laughter bouncing and blond heads glinting in the sun. Their characters - best friends Liesel Meminger and Rudy Steiner - are bright lights in a...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2013
Laszlo Csatary Suspected Nazi war criminal Laszlo Csatary, 98, a Hungarian war crimes suspect who allegedly brutalized and deported thousands of Jewish prisoners to the infamous Nazi concentration camp of Auschwitz during World War II, died of pneumonia at a Budapest hospital on Saturday, his lawyer said Monday. Csatary was charged with war crimes by Hungarian prosecutors in June. He denied allegations that he was involved in torture and deportation while serving as a police commander in the town of Kosice in 1944.
BOOKS
February 23, 1997 | WALTER LAQUEUR, Walter Laqueur is the former director of the Institute of Contemporary History in London and author of numerous books, including "Young Germany" and, most recently, "Fascism" (Oxford University Press)
On Nazism and the Jews a great deal has been written--personal accounts and learned monographs--but there are very few full-scale, general works and, as far as the prewar period is concerned, Saul Friedlander's work (the first of two volumes) is not just a fine book, it is the only one we have so far.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1998 | MICHAEL DOBBS, THE WASHINGTON POST
Three years after Swiss banks became the target of a worldwide furor over their business dealings with Nazi Germany, major American car companies find themselves embroiled in a similar debate. Like the Swiss banks, the U.S. car companies have vigorously denied that they assisted the Nazi war machine or significantly profited from the use of forced labor at their German subsidiaries during World War II.
OPINION
April 23, 2013 | Patt Morrison
It was a fine April day last week that found Elie Wiesel at Chapman University; it was a fine April day too, 58 years earlier, when the gaunt, teenage Wiesel found himself alive and suddenly free to walk out of the Buchenwald concentration camp. In the decades since, Wiesel's impassioned writing and speaking have won him a Nobel Peace Prize, and a large place in the public intellectual discourse about the Holocaust and the human condition. They have also brought him to Chapman each spring for the last three years as a distinguished presidential fellow, meeting with students and faculty to keep the significance of the Holocaust green in their minds.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
For both audiences who admire it and the protagonist who lives it, the intense, emotional "Lore" is a picture from life's other side. While stories dealing with the suffering surrounding World War II and the Holocaust are a dramatic staple, "Lore" flips things around and involves us in a different side of war, in the confusion and pain of the young children of the Nazi hierarchy left alone and abandoned by the exigencies of fate and the fecklessness of...
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